AoBP ECOS Awards – Buckley Lab at UC Davis

“Beginning in 2020, AoBP will award USD $3,000 annually to each of up to three early-career researchers who have dedicated considerable effort to advancing the goals and ideals of open science.

The AoBP ECOS Awards (Early Career Open Science) aim to promote and celebrate people who are changing science for the better. People who are willing to go against the grain of hype-driven science. Willing to resist cynical citation-chasing. Willing to share their data, code and ideas. Willing to stand up for those who have been historically excluded or mistreated in science. Willing to publish negative results. Willing to promote others who respect these things.

To be eligible for an AoBP ECOS Award, you must have been active in research involving plants and the environment within the last two years, and you must be no more than eight years post-PhD. Scientists of any rank or position are eligible (students, postdocs, technicians, faculty). Individuals can self-nominate or be nominated by others (with the nominee’s agreement)….”

Universities should commit to opening up their research to everyone (opinion)

“Since the novel coronavirus struck, scientific research has been shared, and built upon, at an unprecedented pace. An open and deeply collaborative academic enterprise has emerged, with scientists from around the world sharing data and working together to map the SARS-CoV-2 genome and develop the first vaccines.

During normal times — when we’re not in a pandemic — much of the taxpayer-funded research that universities conduct is locked away by publishers, out of reach for all but those who can afford costly subscriptions. This year, given the dire need to fight a deadly disease, publishers temporarily lifted the paywalls that normally shut out this important knowledge from public view….

The COVID-19 crisis inspired a global collaboration that has led to a scientific renaissance — and we must not revert to our old ways. Imagine the progress that could be made if the international research community worked together to develop treatments for cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Climate change, educational equity and racial justice could all be studied through a more expansive and inclusive lens.

Years from now, we will look back at this pandemic as a historic time of incredible challenges, disruption and anguish. But I hope we will also remember it as an inflection point — the end of restricting knowledge to a privileged few and the dawn of a new era in scientific progress.”

MIT Terminates Elsevier Contract Over Open Access Dispute

“In an unprecedented move last year, the University of California system terminated journal negotiations with Elsevier over open access issues and higher costs. Last month MIT did the same, saying the publisher’s proposal did not align with the MIT Framework for Publisher Contracts. The UC system includes more than 280,000 students and over 227,000 faculty staff. MIT has roughly 24,000 students, faculty and staff in its system.

Developed in 2019, MIT’s Framework creates a mechanism to ensure research is freely and immediately available, while recognizing that the value in published papers lies with the authors and institutions that support them. Since it’s debut, more than 100 institutions have endorsed the MIT Framework in recognition of its potential to advance open scholarship….”

L’open science en transition : des pirates à la dérive ?

From Google’s English:  “For years, institutions and scientists have launched great maneuvers to switch to open access. If open science progresses, we remain far from the objectives and the budgets devoted to scientific publications explode. 

In mid-June, the University of California signed an open access agreement with one of the five multinational publishing companies, Springer-Nature. It follows in particular those signed in May by the Dutch and Swiss universities with the other behemoth in the sector, Elsevier. The MIT announced a few days earlier  to end negotiations with Elsevier  for a new subscription contract to its scientific journals, putting forward ”  the principles of open access  ” to justify itself.

Since 2010, the balance of power between the open science movement and the major scientific publishers could appear completely reversed. That year, MIT felt compelled to actively collaborate (while pretending to take a neutral stance) in the investigation against its young student Aaron Swartz….”

Springer Nature Transformative Open Access Agreement – Office of Scholarly Communication

“In June 2020, the University of California (UC) and Springer Nature announced that they have entered into a groundbreaking transformative open access agreement, the first such agreement Springer Nature has established in the United States, and the largest transformative open access agreement in North America to date.  The agreement will enable UC authors who publish with Springer Nature to make their research freely available to the world to read, and will also expand UC’s access to Springer Nature’s subscription journals. Through the agreement, the UC libraries are providing funding to support open access publishing fees for UC authors who publish with Springer Nature journals (including fully covering those fees for authors who do not have research funds available for this purpose) by redirecting funds previously devoted to subscription fees. In addition, the agreement adds reading access to more than 1,000 journals in Springer Nature’s portfolio, along with perpetual access rights to all journals for which there is read access.”

University of California system strikes landmark open-access deal with Springer Nature

“The deal aims to make all UC system research published in participating Springer Nature journals immediately available to the public to read. The open-access agreement shifts how the UC system pays to access and publish research. Instead of UC institutions paying for employees and students to read research in Springer Nature journals, UC institutions will pay for their researchers to publish openly in these journals by default, removing paywalls for everyone. 

Open-access publishing in hybrid journals, which publish both paywalled and open-access research, requires an article processing charge, which is typically a few thousand dollars per article. The UC system intends to pay these charges through a multipayer model that shares costs between libraries and research funds secured by individual researchers….”

Springer Nature Transformative Open Access Agreement and Elsevier Update

“We are pleased to announce that the University of California (UC) has reached a transformative open access agreement with Springer Nature, the world’s second-largest academic publisher.

Under the agreement, all articles with a UC corresponding author published in more than 2,700 of Springer Nature’s journals will be open access by default, with the UC Libraries paying a portion of the open access fee on behalf of all UC authors. Authors without available research funds for the remainder of the publishing fee can request that the Library cover the entire amount. Authors may also choose to opt out of open access publishing if they wish.

Though broad-based open access publishing in the most well-known Nature journals is not initially included, the agreement commits Springer Nature and UC to collaborate on an open science pilot in 2021, and to develop plans for a transformative agreement for all Nature journals to be implemented in the third year of the agreement.

The agreement also includes reading access and perpetual rights to more than 1,000 journals in Springer Nature’s portfolio to which UC did not previously subscribe….”

Springer Nature Transformative Open Access Agreement and Elsevier Update

“We are pleased to announce that the University of California (UC) has reached a transformative open access agreement with Springer Nature, the world’s second-largest academic publisher.

Under the agreement, all articles with a UC corresponding author published in more than 2,700 of Springer Nature’s journals will be open access by default, with the UC Libraries paying a portion of the open access fee on behalf of all UC authors. Authors without available research funds for the remainder of the publishing fee can request that the Library cover the entire amount. Authors may also choose to opt out of open access publishing if they wish.

Though broad-based open access publishing in the most well-known Nature journals is not initially included, the agreement commits Springer Nature and UC to collaborate on an open science pilot in 2021, and to develop plans for a transformative agreement for all Nature journals to be implemented in the third year of the agreement.

The agreement also includes reading access and perpetual rights to more than 1,000 journals in Springer Nature’s portfolio to which UC did not previously subscribe….”

Breaking news: University of California strikes landmark open access deal with Springer Nature | UC Berkeley Library News

“In the midst of what have been difficult times, we are pleased to share some very good news. The University of California has reached a transformative open access agreement with Springer Nature, the world’s second-largest academic publisher.

Under the agreement, all articles with a UC corresponding author published in more than 2,700 of Springer Nature’s journals will be open access by default, with the UC Libraries paying a portion of the open access fee on behalf of all authors. Authors without available research funds for the remainder of the publishing fee can request that the Library cover the entire amount. Authors may also choose to opt out of open access publishing if they wish….”

Breaking news: University of California strikes landmark open access deal with Springer Nature | UC Berkeley Library News

“In the midst of what have been difficult times, we are pleased to share some very good news. The University of California has reached a transformative open access agreement with Springer Nature, the world’s second-largest academic publisher.

Under the agreement, all articles with a UC corresponding author published in more than 2,700 of Springer Nature’s journals will be open access by default, with the UC Libraries paying a portion of the open access fee on behalf of all authors. Authors without available research funds for the remainder of the publishing fee can request that the Library cover the entire amount. Authors may also choose to opt out of open access publishing if they wish….”