Boon for University of California authors: Landmark Springer Nature deal kicks off | UC Berkeley Library News

“Starting this month, research by University of California authors published in Springer journals will by default be freely available to everyone across the globe, thanks to a landmark agreement.

Under UC’s deal with publishing titan Springer Nature — which was inked last year but went into effect Jan. 4 — the UC libraries automatically pay the first $1,000 of the open access fee, also called the article processing charge. Authors lacking research funding can request that the UC libraries pay the entire fee, guaranteeing no author will be turned away for lack of funding.

The first phase of the deal spans journals in the Springer portion of Springer Nature’s portfolio, including Springer, Adis, and Palgrave Macmillan titles as well as academic journals on nature.com. Nature-branded journals are expected to be included in the deal in 2022.

Authors can opt out of open access publishing if they wish….”

Expanding the open access policy beyond the faculty: UC Presidential Open Access Policy

“An institutional open access policy usually covers a certain group of authors, such as faculty members, or members of a certain department or school. The University of California’s Academic Senate policy, adopted in 2013, ensured that scholarly articles authored by senate faculty at all ten UC campuses would be made available to the public at no charge. A precursor to this policy was adopted by the UCSF Academic Senate in 2012.

 
Senate faculty are, however, only a portion of UC researchers who publish scholarly articles; around 22,000 of the approximately 63,000 total authors within the UC System. In 2015, the UC adopted a Presidential Open Access Policy which expanded open access rights and responsibilities to all other UC staff who write scholarly articles while employed at UC, including non-senate researchers, lecturers, post-doctoral scholars, administrative staff, librarians, and graduate students….”

UC-Springer Agreement Activated: Open Access Publishing Support Now Available to UC Authors

“Under the agreement between the University of California and Springer Nature announced last June, it is now easier and more affordable for UC authors to publish their articles open access in Springer journals — including those published by Springer, Adis, and Palgrave Macmillan, as well as academic journals on nature.com. The integration of Nature-branded journals into the agreement is expected in 2022.

Beginning today, all UC corresponding authors who publish in Springer journals will by default have their articles designated as open access and the UC libraries will automatically pay the first $1,000 of the open access fee, formally called an article processing charge or APC. Authors who do not have research funds available can request that the UC libraries pay the entire open access fee, ensuring that lack of research funds does not present a barrier for UC authors who wish to publish open access in these journals. Authors can complete the entire payment process, including requests for full funding support when needed, within Springer Nature’s online article acceptance and publication system. Authors may choose to opt out of open access publishing if they prefer to publish their article on a subscription (pay-to-read) basis.

UC’s open access agreement with Springer Nature is the largest in North America to date and UC’s fifth such agreement with a diverse range of publishers, including Cambridge University Press, computer science society publisher ACM, and native open-access publishers PLoS and JMIR, which publishes the Journal of Medical Internet Research….”

Ivy Anderson to retire from UC in June 2021 – California Digital Library

“It’s with excitement about a new adventure for a dear colleague – and some anticipatory grief – that I share with you news of an upcoming CDL transition: Ivy Anderson, CDL’s Collection Development & Management Director/Associate Executive Director, will be retiring from the University in June 2021.   

Ivy’s contribution to the University of California, and to academic librarianship writ large, can’t be overstated. Ivy began her career at the Brandeis University Libraries, joined the Harvard University Library in 1998, and relocated to California in 2005 to join UC’s California Digital Library. Throughout every step of her career, Ivy’s passion and deep commitment to building and advancing access to world class scholarly collections in ways that are consonant with academic values has been paramount. Through her participation in national and international initiatives she built a global network of colleagues, demonstrating the deep impact of collaborative partnerships in pushing boundaries and developing innovative responses to library challenges. Most recently, Ivy’s efforts to transition UC’s systemwide journal licenses from subscriptions to open access, including developing sustainable financial models for large research-intensive institutions, has decisively advanced the University’s goal of providing immediate, free access to the research output of UC authors….”

Ivy Anderson to retire from UC in June 2021 – California Digital Library

“It’s with excitement about a new adventure for a dear colleague – and some anticipatory grief – that I share with you news of an upcoming CDL transition: Ivy Anderson, CDL’s Collection Development & Management Director/Associate Executive Director, will be retiring from the University in June 2021.   

Ivy’s contribution to the University of California, and to academic librarianship writ large, can’t be overstated. Ivy began her career at the Brandeis University Libraries, joined the Harvard University Library in 1998, and relocated to California in 2005 to join UC’s California Digital Library. Throughout every step of her career, Ivy’s passion and deep commitment to building and advancing access to world class scholarly collections in ways that are consonant with academic values has been paramount. Through her participation in national and international initiatives she built a global network of colleagues, demonstrating the deep impact of collaborative partnerships in pushing boundaries and developing innovative responses to library challenges. Most recently, Ivy’s efforts to transition UC’s systemwide journal licenses from subscriptions to open access, including developing sustainable financial models for large research-intensive institutions, has decisively advanced the University’s goal of providing immediate, free access to the research output of UC authors….”

UC campuses celebrate Open Access Week 2020 – Office of Scholarly Communication

“International Open Access Week is an annual global event celebrating and sharing knowledge about free online access to scholarly publications. This year’s Open Access Week is October 19-25. The theme, “Open with Purpose: Taking Action to Build Structural Equity and Inclusion” marks the third consecutive year that this event will focus on the need for action on equity and inclusion, underscoring the urgency of continuing to center this work. “Openness can be a powerful tool for building more equitable systems of sharing knowledge,” writes Nick Shockey, Director of Programs & Engagement at SPARC. 

The University of California Libraries have planned a variety of workshops and materials to observe International Open Access Week, all of which are free and online. All times are in Pacific, and most events are open to all; see event descriptions for details and exceptions….”

UC/Elsevier Negotiations

“Following a series of informal meetings with Elsevier this spring and summer that suggest there may be new potential for progress, UC’s publisher negotiations team has restarted formal negotiations with Elsevier. UC remains committed to its goal of reaching an agreement that provides for open access publishing of UC-authored articles and restores UC’s access to Elsevier journal content, at a reasonable cost….

As each of its multiyear contracts with large scholarly journal publishers comes to an end, the University of California — in close consultation with all 10 campus libraries and the Academic Senate — is working to hold down the rapidly escalating costs associated with for-profit journals and to facilitate open access publishing of UC research.

 

UC’s last contract with Elsevier expired as of January 1, 2019, and Elsevier has discontinued UC’s access via its online platform, ScienceDirect, to articles published since that date (and some older articles). Articles published before 2019 in the vast majority of journals used by UC scholars should continue to be available via ScienceDirect….”

AoBP ECOS Awards – Buckley Lab at UC Davis

“Beginning in 2020, AoBP will award USD $3,000 annually to each of up to three early-career researchers who have dedicated considerable effort to advancing the goals and ideals of open science.

The AoBP ECOS Awards (Early Career Open Science) aim to promote and celebrate people who are changing science for the better. People who are willing to go against the grain of hype-driven science. Willing to resist cynical citation-chasing. Willing to share their data, code and ideas. Willing to stand up for those who have been historically excluded or mistreated in science. Willing to publish negative results. Willing to promote others who respect these things.

To be eligible for an AoBP ECOS Award, you must have been active in research involving plants and the environment within the last two years, and you must be no more than eight years post-PhD. Scientists of any rank or position are eligible (students, postdocs, technicians, faculty). Individuals can self-nominate or be nominated by others (with the nominee’s agreement)….”

Universities should commit to opening up their research to everyone (opinion)

“Since the novel coronavirus struck, scientific research has been shared, and built upon, at an unprecedented pace. An open and deeply collaborative academic enterprise has emerged, with scientists from around the world sharing data and working together to map the SARS-CoV-2 genome and develop the first vaccines.

During normal times — when we’re not in a pandemic — much of the taxpayer-funded research that universities conduct is locked away by publishers, out of reach for all but those who can afford costly subscriptions. This year, given the dire need to fight a deadly disease, publishers temporarily lifted the paywalls that normally shut out this important knowledge from public view….

The COVID-19 crisis inspired a global collaboration that has led to a scientific renaissance — and we must not revert to our old ways. Imagine the progress that could be made if the international research community worked together to develop treatments for cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Climate change, educational equity and racial justice could all be studied through a more expansive and inclusive lens.

Years from now, we will look back at this pandemic as a historic time of incredible challenges, disruption and anguish. But I hope we will also remember it as an inflection point — the end of restricting knowledge to a privileged few and the dawn of a new era in scientific progress.”

MIT Terminates Elsevier Contract Over Open Access Dispute

“In an unprecedented move last year, the University of California system terminated journal negotiations with Elsevier over open access issues and higher costs. Last month MIT did the same, saying the publisher’s proposal did not align with the MIT Framework for Publisher Contracts. The UC system includes more than 280,000 students and over 227,000 faculty staff. MIT has roughly 24,000 students, faculty and staff in its system.

Developed in 2019, MIT’s Framework creates a mechanism to ensure research is freely and immediately available, while recognizing that the value in published papers lies with the authors and institutions that support them. Since it’s debut, more than 100 institutions have endorsed the MIT Framework in recognition of its potential to advance open scholarship….”