L+H in Anthropology, v2.0 – Google Docs

In its simplest terms and inspired by growing research funder commitment to open access (see Plan S), Libraria is proposing a Library+Funder (L+F) model that first of all harnesses the Gates Foundation’s strategy, in which the research funder pays the publisher directly for the cost of publishing the research it has supported. It then combines Gates’ direct-payment strategy with the success of SCOAP3, Open Library of Humanities, and Knowledge Unlatched in soliciting broadly based library support for sustaining open access journals.

To enable anthropology journals to convert from subscriptions to open access under this proposed L+F model, funding agencies that support the research published in the journals would be asked to cover their share of the publishers’ revenue which was previously derived from subscriptions. In addition, the libraries subscribing to the journals undergoing this conversion would be asked to cover the remainder of the revenue needed to replace the money previously collected through subscriptions. In the case of the 21 anthropology journals that we have examined thus far (data), funders have sponsored the work of roughly a quarter of the items published, which leaves the libraries to cover the other three-quarters. If only the leading funders participate in the initial roll out of the model, which seems like a reasonable starting point, their share would be smaller but the libraries would still pay less than they would for a subscription (with more of the details below).…”

At MIT anthropologists plan a model for Open Access

“Publishers, librarians, research funders, and leaders from across the field of anthropology — including journal editors and representatives of the major Anglophone anthropological societies of both Europe and North America — gathered at MIT on April 24, 2019 for an invitational workshop focused on a sea change for everyone who attended: moving the discipline’s journals to an Open-Access (OA) model.

 
Currently, the expense of academic publishing creates significant barriers to the broad dissemination of scholarly findings. The goal of the workshop was to consider a new model for providing open access to journal publications in a way that could transform both anthropology and a full range of academic disciplines….”

At MIT anthropologists plan a model for Open Access

“Publishers, librarians, research funders, and leaders from across the field of anthropology — including journal editors and representatives of the major Anglophone anthropological societies of both Europe and North America — gathered at MIT on April 24, 2019 for an invitational workshop focused on a sea change for everyone who attended: moving the discipline’s journals to an Open-Access (OA) model.

 
Currently, the expense of academic publishing creates significant barriers to the broad dissemination of scholarly findings. The goal of the workshop was to consider a new model for providing open access to journal publications in a way that could transform both anthropology and a full range of academic disciplines….”

If Research Libraries and Funders Finance Open Access: Moving Beyond Subscriptions and APCs | Willinsky | College & Research Libraries

Abstract:  Following the examples of SCOAP3, in which libraries fund open access, and eLife, in which funding agencies have begun to directly fund open access scholarly publishing, this study presents an analysis of how creatively combining these two models might provide a means to move toward universal open access (without APCs). This study calculates the publishing costs for the funders that sponsor the research and for the libraries that cover unsponsored articles for two nonprofit biomedical publishers, eLife and PLOS, and the nonprofit journal aggregator BioOne. These entities represent a mix of publishing revenue models, including funder sponsorship, article processing charges (APC), and subscription fees. Using PubMed filtering and manual-sampling strategies, as well as publicly available publisher revenue data, the study found that, in 2015, 86 percent of the articles in eLife and PLOS acknowledge funder support, as do 76 percent of the articles in the largely subscription journals of BioOne. Such findings can inform libraries and funding agencies, as well as publishers, in their consideration of a direct-payment open access model, as the study (a) demonstrates the cost breakdown for funder and library support for open access among this sample of X articles; (b) posits how publishing data-management organizations such as Crossref and ORCID can facilitate such a model of funder and library per-article open access payments; and (c) proposes ways in which such a model offers a more efficient, equitable, and scalable approach to open access across the disciplines than the prevailing APC model, which originated with biomedical publishing.

Converting the Literature of a Scientific Field to Open Access Through Global Collaboration: the Experience of SCOAP3 in Particle Physics[v1] | Preprints

Kohls, A.; Mele, S. Converting the Literature of a Scientific Field to Open Access Through Global Collaboration: the Experience of SCOAP3 in Particle Physics. Preprints 2018

Abstract: Gigantic particle accelerators, incredibly complex detectors, an antimatter factory and the discovery of the Higgs boson – this is part of what makes CERN famous. Only a few know that CERN also hosts the world largest Open Access initiative: SCOAP3. The Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics (SCOAP3) started operation in 2014 and has since supported the publication of 19,000 Open Access articles in the field of particle physics, at no direct cost, nor burden, for individual authors worldwide. SCOAP3 is made possible by a 3,000-institute strong partnership, where libraries re-direct funds previously used for subscriptions to ’flip’ articles to ’gold Open Access’. With its recent expansion, the initiative now covers about 90% of the journal literature of the field. This article describes the economic principles of SCOAP3, the collaborative approach of the partnership, and finally summarizes financial results after four years of successful operation.”

Springer to convert two journals in high energy physics to open access

“The SCOAP3 consortium (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics), which aims to convert journals in high energy physics to open access, has chosen two Springer journals to participate in the initiative. They are the Journal of High Energy Physics, published for the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA – Trieste, Italy), and the European Physical Journal C, published with Società Italiana di Fisica. The selection is the result of an open and transparent tender process run by CERN for the benefit of SCOAP3, in which journal quality, price and publishing services were taken into account….”

CERN and American Physical Society sign Open Access Agreement for SCOAP³ – Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB)

“After lengthy negotiations, CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, and the American Physical Society (APS) have now signed an Open Access Agreement for SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics): from January 2018, all articles on high energy physics in the three leading APS journals “Physical Review C”, “Physical Review D” and “Physical Review Letters” will be published Gold Open Access, meaning that such articles will be freely accessible from the very first publication. In 2014 and 2015, APS articles accounted for around 44 per cent of all articles on high energy physics published throughout the world. As a result of the agreement concluded between CERN and APS, the number of articles on high energy physics will virtually double from 2018. This signifies a major success for the SCOAP³ project, which, as a result, includes almost 90 per cent of journal articles in the field of high energy physics.

Thanks to the agreement between CERN and APS, SCOAP³ now includes almost 90 per cent of journal articles in the field of high energy physics. With the involvement of 3,000 libraries and research institutions from 44 countries and the support of eight research promotion organisations, SCOAP³ is the biggest Open Access initiative in the world. Ever since the SCOAP³ repository was launched in 2014, 15,000 articles by around 20,000 academics from 100 countries have been made freely accessible for all to read. The publishing fees for SCOAP³ articles are paid out of a central fund, financed by the participating institutions, meaning that no costs are incurred by the authors themselves….”

SCOAP3 and APS: What You Need to Know

“The APS Board of Directors voted on April 23 to enter into an agreement with the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to participate in the Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics (SCOAP3). Here’s what it means for you as a member, author, and researcher.”

Nutzung von Zeitschriften verdoppelt sich dank Open Access

From Google’s English: “Under SCOAP³ from professional journals of high-energy physics research open access are provided. SCOAP³ or Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics is an international consortium that has published 13,400 articles Open Access in the first funding period (2014 to 2016). 60% of all downloads were based on two SpringerNature magazines [1], 28% of the downloads on two Elsevier magazines [2].

Both publishers have now announced that the number of downloads from these journals has doubled since they joined SCOAP³ on 01.01.2014….”