How Could COVID-19 Change Scholarly Communication to a New Normal in the Open Science Paradigm? – ScienceDirect

Abstract:  Author reviews digital transformation of scholarly communication since 1990s and explains how COVID-19 is accelerating open science, with some analogy of chemical reactions. Discussing the current situation of preprint, the potential of peer review, and the essence of open science, developing additional services and balancing incremental and innovation in the transition state is crucial to foster new trust among stakeholders.

 

The Move to Open Access as Ebook Crisis Worsens – Campaign to investigate the academic ebook market

“1) In March 2020, several academic publishers and 3rd party vendors announced, to much fanfare, that they were opening up access to many of their resources for free. Whilst this move was welcomed by many in Higher Education, much of the content was withdrawn as little as three months later while COVID was still raging. Access has not been reinstated during this most recent lock-down. (One has to wonder if the original offer was little but a cynical marketing strategy).

2) Unlike March 2020, many students are starting the semester away from campus and so cannot make the dash to access hardcopy resources as they may have done last year….

Librarians, academics and, more importantly, students, cannot wait for senior figures to act at this critical time in the HE cycle. Librarians are increasingly turning to the complex world of open access resources to fill the huge holes in information provision bought about by traditional academic publisher business models. There is hope that open access will become more and more commonplace going forward….”

Let it flow: COVID-19 pandemic underscores need to share research; but how will it work

“In a way, options such as Plan S and the nation-wide subscription policy [proposed in India] worsen inequal ities between scholars from developing and developed countries and between researchers from rich and poor universities. Clearly, better models are needed to ensure open access to research.”

 

Ebook Collection Development in Academic Libraries: Examining Preference, Management, and Purchasing Patterns

“Key findings: • Electronic books are now an established part of academic library collections, and many libraries report planned future expenditures in this format. On average, ebooks constitute approximately one-third of a library’s monograph collection. • Patron convenience and need are the main motivators for libraries’ investment in ebooks. The top four advantages of ebooks identified by institutions are all user-related: anywhere access, anytime access, enhancement of distance/online education, and allowance for multi-user access. As this survey was conducted during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many respondents emphasized the benefits of access. Typical responses included “perfect for COVID-19,” “these are the only books our students can access right now because of COVID-19,” and “serving college programs and courses now being taught remotely due to pandemic.” • Librarians believe that patrons are increasingly format agnostic when it comes to monographs, and as a result they are purchasing a mix of print and electronic books dictated by availability, cost, and collecting scope rather than assumptions about patron preferences. • The ebook acquisition landscape is complex with multiple vendors, platforms, and purchase models to navigate. Despite this complexity and the inherent frustrations that it brings, libraries are effectively handling the challenges and do not see them as insurmountable barriers to acquiring ebook content. • The ebook format has not transformed the collecting scopes and strategies of academic libraries. Libraries are purchasing the same types of content in ebook format as they purchase in print, focusing on the relevance of the content and not the format….

Saving money is an oft-cited benefit of ebooks for patrons as well. The push for libraries to invest in etextbooks and open educational resources are movements to help offset the growing expense of higher education for students. When libraries invest in these options, they save students thousands of dollars. Ebooks also avoid punitive late fees and fines for books, since they are never overdue or damaged; ebooks are either downloaded and stored on a patron’s computer or access to the content expires….

Nearly all academic libraries and their home institutions instituted stay-at-home orders to prevent the spread of COVID-19. With campuses closed, access to physical books through a library’s holdings or interlibrary loan was limited to non-existent. Libraries and their patrons looked to digital research objects such as ebooks to support research and instructional needs from a distance. In addition to using a library’s existing ebook collections, patrons also utilized open access ebooks, ebooks from the Internet Archive, and ebooks from the Hathi Trust Emergency Temporary Access Service (for participating libraries). …”

Farewell Print Textbook Reserves: A COVID-19 Change to Embrace | EDUCAUSE

“The current turn of events points to the future demise of print textbook reserves. It should spur librarians and their faculty colleagues to imagine higher education with fully digital e-reserves and a commitment to born-digital, zero- or low-cost learning materials that all students can equitably afford to access. We should adopt Open Educational Resources (OER) to the fullest extent possible. Together, let us learn from this COVID-19 experience and move forward by eliminating our fragile dependence on course content that commercial publishers refuse to make available to libraries in digital format. Any sustainable future for affordable and accessible digital learning materials must come from within the academy.”

Farewell Print Textbook Reserves: A COVID-19 Change to Embrace | EDUCAUSE

“The current turn of events points to the future demise of print textbook reserves. It should spur librarians and their faculty colleagues to imagine higher education with fully digital e-reserves and a commitment to born-digital, zero- or low-cost learning materials that all students can equitably afford to access. We should adopt Open Educational Resources (OER) to the fullest extent possible. Together, let us learn from this COVID-19 experience and move forward by eliminating our fragile dependence on course content that commercial publishers refuse to make available to libraries in digital format. Any sustainable future for affordable and accessible digital learning materials must come from within the academy.”

Waiving article processing charges for least developed countries: a keystone of a large-scale open access transformation

Abstract:  This article investigates whether it is economically feasible for a large publishing house to waive article processing charges for the group of 47 so-called least developed countries (LDC). As an example, Springer Nature is selected. The analysis is based on the Web of Science, OpenAPC and the Jisc Collections’ Springer Compact journal list. As a result, it estimates an average yearly publication output of 520 publications (or 0.26% of the worldwide publication output in Springer Nature journals) for the LDC country group. The loss of revenues for Springer Nature would be US$1.1 million if a waiver was applied for all of these countries. Given that the subject categories of these publications indicate the output is of high societal relevance for LDC, and given that money is indispensable for development in these countries (e.g. life expectancy, health, education), it is not only desirable but also possible in economic terms for a publisher like Springer Nature to waive APCs for these countries without much loss in revenues.

 

Waiving article processing charges for least developed countries: a keystone of a large-scale open access transformation

Abstract:  This article investigates whether it is economically feasible for a large publishing house to waive article processing charges for the group of 47 so-called least developed countries (LDC). As an example, Springer Nature is selected. The analysis is based on the Web of Science, OpenAPC and the Jisc Collections’ Springer Compact journal list. As a result, it estimates an average yearly publication output of 520 publications (or 0.26% of the worldwide publication output in Springer Nature journals) for the LDC country group. The loss of revenues for Springer Nature would be US$1.1 million if a waiver was applied for all of these countries. Given that the subject categories of these publications indicate the output is of high societal relevance for LDC, and given that money is indispensable for development in these countries (e.g. life expectancy, health, education), it is not only desirable but also possible in economic terms for a publisher like Springer Nature to waive APCs for these countries without much loss in revenues.

 

Rethink and reassess the role of community in post-pandemic open scie…

“In this OAWeek 2020 we share three of our main concerns from a developing region perspective ?Underfunding of community-owned infrastructures because scarce funds directed to APCs ?Researchers rewarded only when publishing in “mainstream” journals with “prestige industry” indicators, making invisible other contributions ?Weak international dialogue, cooperation and interoperability among community-owned infrastructures…”