Scientific Data recommended repositories

“Spreadsheet listing data repositories that are recommended by Scientific Data (Springer Nature) as being suitable for hosting data associated with peer-reviewed articles. Please see the repository list on Scientific Data’s website for the most up to date list….”

The State of Open Data 2020 #StateOfOpenData – Digital Science

“Our portfolio company, Figshare, has today launched its annual report The State of Open Data 2020. The report is the fifth in the series and includes survey results and a collection of articles from global industry experts, as well as a foreword from Dr Leslie McIntosh, CEO of Ripeta and Executive Director, Emeritus – Research Data Alliance US.

The State of Open Data is now the longest running longitudinal study on the subject, which was created in 2016, to examine attitudes and experiences of researchers working with open data – sharing it, reusing it, and redistributing it.

This year’s survey received around 4,500 responses from the research community and had an additional focus on research practices in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. It asked researchers how the pandemic was impacting their ability to carry out research, and their views on reuse of data and collaboration….”

Why figshare? Choosing a new technical infrastructure for 4TU.ResearchData | Open Working

“4TU.ResearchData is an international repository for research data in science, engineering and design. After over 10 years of using Fedora, an open source repository system, to run  4TU.ResearchData, we have made a decision to migrate a significant part of our technical infrastructure to a commercial solution offered by figshare. Why did we decide to do it? Why now, at a time of increasing concerns about relying on proprietary solutions, particularly associated with large publishing houses, to run scholarly communication infrastructures? (see for example, In pursuit of open science, open access is not enough and the SPARC Landscape Analysis)

We anticipate that members of our community, as well as colleagues that use or manage scholarly communications infrastructures might be wondering the same. We are therefore explaining our thinking in this blogpost, hoping it will facilitate more discussion about such developments in the scholarly communications infrastructure….”

The never-ending story | Research Information

“At the same time, the REF open access mandate had just been announced, stating journal articles and some conference proceedings had to be publicly accessible within three months of acceptance for publication in order to be eligible for submission for the post-2014 research excellence framework. Given the double-whammy of easier depositing and REF urgency, WestminsterResearch saw self-deposits rocket from less than one per cent to more than 99 per cent while practice-based/non text-based entries mushroomed by 246 per cent.

‘The Haplo repository and REF open access mandate came at a similar time and the combined power of both led to this massive increase in self-deposits,’ highlights Watts. 

‘The mandates really helped people to comply to open access,’ she adds. ‘And we believe that factors contributing to more practice-based research included vastly improved templates and fields for these outputs… in the past, the repository just couldn’t take this content.’

Following these results and the looming REF2021, WestminsterResearch switched to a full Haplo open source-set up in 2018, and entries have continued to rise. As Watts put it: ‘I don’t think we’d have been able to support the increase in open access deposits without this rise in self-depositing.’…”

The never-ending story | Research Information

“At the same time, the REF open access mandate had just been announced, stating journal articles and some conference proceedings had to be publicly accessible within three months of acceptance for publication in order to be eligible for submission for the post-2014 research excellence framework. Given the double-whammy of easier depositing and REF urgency, WestminsterResearch saw self-deposits rocket from less than one per cent to more than 99 per cent while practice-based/non text-based entries mushroomed by 246 per cent.

‘The Haplo repository and REF open access mandate came at a similar time and the combined power of both led to this massive increase in self-deposits,’ highlights Watts. 

‘The mandates really helped people to comply to open access,’ she adds. ‘And we believe that factors contributing to more practice-based research included vastly improved templates and fields for these outputs… in the past, the repository just couldn’t take this content.’

Following these results and the looming REF2021, WestminsterResearch switched to a full Haplo open source-set up in 2018, and entries have continued to rise. As Watts put it: ‘I don’t think we’d have been able to support the increase in open access deposits without this rise in self-depositing.’…”

The State of Open Data Report 2019

“The State of Open Data 2019 report is the fourth in the series and includes survey results and a collection of articles from global industry experts.

It is now the longest running longitudinal study on the subject, which was created in 2016 to examine attitudes and experiences of researchers working with open data – sharing it, reusing it, and redistributing it. This year’s survey received a record number of survey participants with around 8,500 responses from the research community.

 

While most trends are encouraging around the adoption and acceptance of open data, the research community is now demanding more enforcement of the mandates that have been adopted by many governments, funders, publishers and institutions around the world.

The majority of researchers want funding withheld and penalties for a lack of data sharing….”

The State of Open Data Report 2019

“The State of Open Data 2019 report is the fourth in the series and includes survey results and a collection of articles from global industry experts.

It is now the longest running longitudinal study on the subject, which was created in 2016 to examine attitudes and experiences of researchers working with open data – sharing it, reusing it, and redistributing it. This year’s survey received a record number of survey participants with around 8,500 responses from the research community.

 

While most trends are encouraging around the adoption and acceptance of open data, the research community is now demanding more enforcement of the mandates that have been adopted by many governments, funders, publishers and institutions around the world.

The majority of researchers want funding withheld and penalties for a lack of data sharing….”

The State of Open Data 2019 – Global Attitudes towards Open Data #Stateofopendata – Digital Science

“Our portfolio company, Figshare, has today launched its annual report The State of Open Data 2019, to coincide with global celebrations around Open Access Week. The report is the fourth in the series and includes survey results and a collection of articles from global industry experts, as well as a foreword from Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost (UCL Library Services).

The State of Open Data is now the longest running longitudinal study on the subject, which was created in 2016 to examine attitudes and experiences of researchers working with open data – sharing it, reusing it, and redistributing it. …”