What is Open Science: even a 12-year old child can participate in creation of a scientific article – YouTube

“Our first introduction video is dedicated to the problem of peer review process in scientific communication. In the view of recent scandals with articles retraction from prestigious journals such as hydroxychloroquine study from the Lancet journal, we must overview the need of peer review in the current scholarly publishing system. What is a peer review and why does it prevent our scientific progress and citizens participation in it? What is Open science and Open peer review? And why do we need to transform our science to be open?

To answer these questions, we invited to the interview Matheus Pereira Lobo, Brazilian physicist and mathematician, professor at the Federal University of Tocantins, co-editor of the Open Journal of Mathematics and Physics. He shares his thoughts about peer review process and tells about the alternative, his Open Journal of Mathematics and Physics which welcomes collaboration not only with his colleagues but with the broad public.”

Get ready for Horizon Europe: Open Science – The Guild

“Open Science will become the modus operandi in Horizon Europe, the next EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. This will affect provisions such as those regarding publications, research data management, and the engagement of citizens in the project.

To provide a glimpse into the expected changes, The Guild interviewed Mr. Konstantinos Glinos, Head of Unit for Open Science at the European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG RTD). 

During this discussion, we first explore the topic of Open Science as a strategic priority, its contribution to research efficiency, and the barriers that prevent the speeding up and the uptake and implementation of Open Science. We then delve into the main changes expected in Horizon Europe in the areas of Open Access, research data management, and Citizen Science. Finally, we also examine how Open Science could be embedded in the entire research process, from the methodology definition until the sharing of final results.  

We hope this video will help researchers and institutions to prepare for the forthcoming requirements in Horizon Europe….”

Get ready for Horizon Europe: Open Science – The Guild

“Open Science will become the modus operandi in Horizon Europe, the next EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. This will affect provisions such as those regarding publications, research data management, and the engagement of citizens in the project.

To provide a glimpse into the expected changes, The Guild interviewed Mr. Konstantinos Glinos, Head of Unit for Open Science at the European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG RTD). 

During this discussion, we first explore the topic of Open Science as a strategic priority, its contribution to research efficiency, and the barriers that prevent the speeding up and the uptake and implementation of Open Science. We then delve into the main changes expected in Horizon Europe in the areas of Open Access, research data management, and Citizen Science. Finally, we also examine how Open Science could be embedded in the entire research process, from the methodology definition until the sharing of final results.  

We hope this video will help researchers and institutions to prepare for the forthcoming requirements in Horizon Europe….”

What is Creative Commons? How CC came to be V1 (June 2020) on Vimeo

“This video was made for the Creative Commons Certificate course for Librarians in June 2020.

A basic understanding of copyright is necessary to understand why and how Creative Commons was founded. This video starts with a few of the notable events in the history of copyright and ends with the Creative Commons, the licenses, the organisation and the community.

This video is work in progress and might be updated in the near future.

Full text: docs.google.com/document/d/1J5R-qk8T3PwHajkd-icryrvQ2D7zMrrP8sw6J4Vn4ng/edit?usp=sharing …”

Guest Post – Streaming Live – Oral Arguments in FTC v. OMICS – The Scholarly Kitchen

“At 9 a.m. (PST, GMT-8) on Wednesday, June 10, 2020, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is scheduled to stream live video of the oral arguments in Federal Trade Commission v. OMICS Group Inc., et al., from its website and YouTube channel. Members of the scholarly publishing community may enjoy watching judges and lawyers argue over the finer points of predatory journals, peer review, the impact factor, journal indexing, and article processing charges. Sessions generally last between 30 minutes and an hour. This blog post provides a preview of some of the arguments that will be presented….”

Join us to create, edit, and curate at OSKB Hackathon at SIPS 2020! – YouTube

“Dive into a brand new OSKB prototype and make a contribution during our hackathon! Learn how individuals or organizations can collaborate with OSKB to curate, review, and contribute resources for the purpose of accessible instruction in open research best practices for all.

Brainstorm, review, and improve the OSKB editorial and governance plans at SIPS 2020!…”

Activists create public online spreadsheet of police violence videos.

“Police officers around the country have been responding with violence as demonstrators gather to protest the killing of George Floyd. Much of this violence has been caught on video and has been instrumental in pushing authorities to hold officers accountable. In Buffalo, for example, two police officers were charged after video went viral of officers shoving a 75-year-old protester to the ground. In New York, two police officers were suspended for violence that was caught on video: an officer violently pushing a woman to the ground and another pulling a protester’s face mask down before blasting pepper spray. The sheer volume of material coming out of the demonstrations though makes it difficult to keep track so two activists decided to start compiling the clips into a handy spreadsheet that is available online….

Lawyer T. Greg Doucette and mathematician Jason Miller have been working to compile the videos in the Google Sheet titled “GeorgeFloyd Protest – police brutality videos on Twitter.” The database currently has 428 videos. Doucette started the effort as a Twitter thread. Miller saw that and realized it was going to be long and unwieldy so he wanted to create a way for people to easily access and sort the videos. For those who aren’t obsessively scrolling through their timelines all day, the spreadsheet can help easily locate videos of police violence in their area because they can be sorted by city and state. The activists have also created a Google Drive with backups of all the videos.

Having all video evidence of police violence documented in one place helps counter the argument that these are just isolated incidents. “When they’re shared as one-offs, you see a familiar pattern,” Doucette tells Vice. “The victim ‘was no angel’ or ‘wasn’t perfect’ or ‘just should have complied,’ and the officer is ‘just one bad apple,’ or ‘we shouldn’t rush to judgment,’ or ‘you don’t know what happened before the video started rolling.’” 

Underline | Watch lectures from the best researchers.

“The world’s first repository platform for cutting-edge scientific lectures, research, discussions and conference live-streaming….”

We are building a forum-like platform for speakers and peers to engage with each other and spark ideas….

Each lecture has it’s own DOI number, it can be referenced, cited and shared across platforms and scientific literature….

Cite and share any lectures across the platforms. Be it a colleague from your organisation or collaborator overseas, Underline makes it easy for you to keep everyone on the same page.”

Apparently gratis at best, not libre. See the terms of use.

https://www.underline.io/terms-of-use

 

Open Publishing Festival 2020: Open Infrastructure principles for third party involvement – YouTube

“In the past years, principles around open scholarly infrastructure have been proposed to provide guidance on development and procurement of services, among others by SPARC NA. As a next step, in the Netherlands, a set of guidelines, now under open consultation, will inform future terms and conditions for collaborations with third parties on research information.

These guiding principles address: – ownership of (meta)data – enduring access – trusted and transparent provenance – open collaboration with the market – interoperability – community-owned governance But how do these resonate with service providers? If the recent result of the Dutch negotiations with Elsevier shows anything, it is that there are multiple interpretations as to what collaboration on open science infrastructure means. In this session, we intend to have a discussion with open science specialists and providers of open scholarly infrastructure. Do for-profit and non-profit providers have different interests in this regard? Will these principle-based collaborations fit the goals of open science? Organized by Bianca Kramer, Jeroen Bosman, Jeroen Sondervan (Utrecht University Library).”