In Publishing: The latest on the open-source publishing platform Libero | Inside eLife | eLife

In a webinar on March 11, the team at eLife gave an update on Libero Publisher – one component of the open-source publishing technology suite eLife is building – and how publishers, libraries and developers can collaborate on the project….”
 

Following UC’s break with Elsevier, messages of support from around the world pour in | UC Berkeley Library News

“On Thursday, the University of California announced its separation with Elsevier, one of the world’s largest — and most profitable — publishers of academic research.

After months of negotiations, the publisher had refused to meet UC’s core demands: universal open access to UC research and a subscription plan that would account for open access publishing fees. So UC walked away.

In the days since, messages of support and congratulations have come pouring in from around the world. Here is a sample of the responses, by turns fiery, joyous, and heartwarming….”

The Scientific Paper Is Obsolete. Here’s What’s Next. – The Atlantic

“Perhaps the paper itself is to blame. Scientific methods evolve now at the speed of software; the skill most in demand among physicists, biologists, chemists, geologists, even anthropologists and research psychologists, is facility with programming languages and “data science” packages. And yet the basic means of communicating scientific results hasn’t changed for 400 years. Papers may be posted online, but they’re still text and pictures on a page.

What would you get if you designed the scientific paper from scratch today? …

Software is a dynamic medium; paper isn’t. When you think in those terms it does seem strange that research like Strogatz’s, the study of dynamical systems, is so often being shared on paper …

I spoke to Theodore Gray, who has since left Wolfram Research to become a full-time writer. He said that his work on the notebook was in part motivated by the feeling, well formed already by the early 1990s, “that obviously all scientific communication, all technical papers that involve any sort of data or mathematics or modeling or graphs or plots or anything like that, obviously don’t belong on paper. That was just completely obvious in, let’s say, 1990,” he said. …”

 

 

Public Access Submission System on Vimeo

“Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, MIT, and 221B have developed the Public Access Submission System (PASS), which will support compliance with US funding agencies’ public access policies and institutional open access policies. By combining workflows between the two compliance pathways, PASS facilitates simultaneous submission into funder repositories (e.g., PubMedCentral) and institutional repositories. We intend to integrate a data archive so that researchers can submit cited data at the same time. PASS also features a novel technology stack including Fedora, Ember, JSON-LD, Elasticsearch, ActiveMQ, Java and Shibboleth (with an eye toward multi-institutional support). This talk will include a demonstration of PASS in action. The talk will also outline the steps by which we have engaged the university’s central administration (including the president’s office and the provost’s office) to provide funding, sponsorship for PASS and access to internal grants databases (e.g., COEUS) and engaged US funding agencies including the National Institutes of Health who have offered access to APIs for tracking and correlating submissions, and the National Science Foundation which discussed ways to integrate PASS and their reporting system in the future.”

10 ans d’Open Access à l’Université de Liège – YouTube

From Google’s English: “Il y a 10 ans naissait ORBi (Open Repository and Bibliography), un répertoire institutionnel qui vise à collecter, préserver et diffuser la production scientifique des membres de l’Université de Liège. “

Benjamin Mako Hil – Research Symbiont Award Speech – YouTube

Speech by Benjamin Mako Hill that was recorded for the presentations of the Research Symbiont Awards on January 6, 2019. The General Symbiosis Award “is given to a scientist working in any field who has shared data beyond the expectations of their field. For example, we seek applications from symbiotic scientists working in sociology, ecology, astrophysics, or any other field of science.”

A sad story: The conference was held in Hawaii and Mako couldn’t attend. They showed this recording instead….”