Public Access Submission System on Vimeo

“Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, MIT, and 221B have developed the Public Access Submission System (PASS), which will support compliance with US funding agencies’ public access policies and institutional open access policies. By combining workflows between the two compliance pathways, PASS facilitates simultaneous submission into funder repositories (e.g., PubMedCentral) and institutional repositories. We intend to integrate a data archive so that researchers can submit cited data at the same time. PASS also features a novel technology stack including Fedora, Ember, JSON-LD, Elasticsearch, ActiveMQ, Java and Shibboleth (with an eye toward multi-institutional support). This talk will include a demonstration of PASS in action. The talk will also outline the steps by which we have engaged the university’s central administration (including the president’s office and the provost’s office) to provide funding, sponsorship for PASS and access to internal grants databases (e.g., COEUS) and engaged US funding agencies including the National Institutes of Health who have offered access to APIs for tracking and correlating submissions, and the National Science Foundation which discussed ways to integrate PASS and their reporting system in the future.”

10 ans d’Open Access à l’Université de Liège – YouTube

From Google’s English: “Il y a 10 ans naissait ORBi (Open Repository and Bibliography), un répertoire institutionnel qui vise à collecter, préserver et diffuser la production scientifique des membres de l’Université de Liège. “

Benjamin Mako Hil – Research Symbiont Award Speech – YouTube

Speech by Benjamin Mako Hill that was recorded for the presentations of the Research Symbiont Awards on January 6, 2019. The General Symbiosis Award “is given to a scientist working in any field who has shared data beyond the expectations of their field. For example, we seek applications from symbiotic scientists working in sociology, ecology, astrophysics, or any other field of science.”

A sad story: The conference was held in Hawaii and Mako couldn’t attend. They showed this recording instead….”

An Open Approach to Huntington’s Disease – Rachel Harding – Project Presentation – YouTube

“Since February 2016, Dr Harding has been keeping an open lab notebook for the huntingtin structure-function project through the blog labscribbles.com and the data repository Zenodo. By sharing data widely and more quickly than is normally done in biomedical science, Dr Harding hopes to catalyze research on this disease….”

Making Open Access Accessible – Home

“The great benefit of making items open access is that, supposedly, anyone with access to the internet can read them. However, many open access advocates don’t always think about people different from them, especially those who are not always able to read or hear what is online. Too often the items we put online that are either open access or promote open access are not made to work with these needs. 

I put together this website to try to address one small area of this problem – online videos promoting open access and other open topics – through the power of crowd sourcing….”

Archive of Our Own

The Organization for Transformative Works (OTW) is a nonprofit organization, established by fans in 2007, to serve the interests of fans by providing access to and preserving the history of fanworks and fan culture in its myriad forms. We believe that fanworks are transformative and that transformative works are legitimate.

We are proactive and innovative in protecting and defending our work from commercial exploitation and legal challenge. We preserve our fannish economy, values, and creative expression by protecting and nurturing our fellow fans, our work, our commentary, our history, and our identity while providing the broadest possible access to fannish activity for all fans.

The Archive of Our Own offers a noncommercial and nonprofit central hosting place for fanworks using open-source archiving software….”

Open access Academic publishing in transition

It’s the year 2024: a scientist in Sudan, the family member of a patient with a rare disease in the United States, a farmer in China – assuming they have access to the internet, they are all able to access the latest scientific findings at any time, without restriction and free of charge. On this basis, they can develop new energy supply options for their community, prepare for visits to the doctor or follow the latest research on seeds and breeds. A pipe dream? Or isn’t free access to academic literature something we should have had for a long time, three decades since the development of the world wide web?