COAR Forum on COVID-19, Open Science, and Repositories – COAR

“On September 10, 2020, COAR hosted a 2-hour forum highlighting the role of open science and open repositories in the context of COVID-19. The forum showcased several collaborative initiatives from around the world aiming to improve the discovery of, and access to, COVID-19 research outputs.

Participants learned about three projects from different regions, followed by an interactive session in which participants shared information about their activities using the mentimeter platform. 

A recording and presentations are now available! COAR will be providing other opportunities for information sharing in the coming months.

Key Takeaways

1. COVID-19 has led to an increase in awareness of open science

2. Many participants are engaged in COVID-19 related activities, including:

recruiting COVID-19 resources into repositories
improving discovery of COVID-19 related content
supporting text and data mining
advocating for open science
delivering resources for online learning

3. Challenges for participants include:

copyright, embargoes and licenses attached to resources
metadata and data curation
infrastructure
connectivity

4. COAR can help through activities such as:

community building
advocacy
defining best practices
supporting information sharing…”

How to Boost the Impact of Scientific Conferences: Cell

“We can maximize the impact of scientific conferences by uploading all conference presentations, posters, and abstracts to highly trafficked public repositories for each content type. Talks can be hosted on sites like YouTube and Youku, posters can be published on Figshare, and papers and abstracts can become open access preprints.”

 

 

Recap of the CHORUS Forum on Open Access Policies and Compliance in a Global Context – CHORUS

“Over 150 publishers (society, commercial, and university press), librarians, funders, service providers, university administrators, faculty, and researchers attended the virtual CHORUS Forum on Open Access Policies and Compliance in a Global Context on 30 July 2020. CHORUS Chairman Alix Vance (AIP Publishing CEO) kicked off the day by welcoming participants and introducing speakers.

Watch Forum Video Now

Here’s a summary of the program’s presentations:…”

The DOI for data – YouTube

“The Digital Object Identifier, or DOI, is a persistent link, and specifically, it is an identifier allowing data to the traced from production to publication. By citing DOIs in all their publications, users guarantee the traceability of all the details of their experiment. This includes the request for beamtime, the experimental parameters and conditions, the instrumentation used, the data obtained, the analysis of this data, and the names of the research team members.”

Open Science is a tool which creates a new infrastructure, and it needs to be used correctly – YouTube

“For our second episode we invited German neurobiologist Björn Brembs. In the first part we discussed his scientific background in neurogenetics and research on the fruit fly and snail behaviour. Björn also told us about his way to the Open Science movement. Upon the development of his academic career he realised that there is no digital infrastructure using which he can store his results, data, code and share with other scientists. In addition, he found that the current academic publishing process is fully controlled by the commercial companies. For him Open Science means not only the openness in sharing information, it means the creation of a tool that needs to be used correctly in order to make scientific findings available for everyone….”

Webinar Video: Citizen Science At Universities: Trends, Guidelines and Recommendations – LIBER

“A number of European recommendations – including the LERU’s advice paper “Citizen Science at Universities: Trends, Guidelines and Recommendations” – highlight the importance of creating a single point of contact for citizen science within the institution.”

Choice360 | Advance Your University’s Research Mission with Text and Data Mining

“Research is evolving from all angles – and academic libraries must ensure their faculty and students have access to the latest content and technology they need to keep up.

In this webinar, you’ll hear from John Cocklin at Dartmouth College and Caroline Muglia at the University of Southern California – two academic librarians who are playing a critical part in advancing their university’s research mission by investing in text and data mining (TDM)….”

Open Science is a tool which creates a new infrastructure, and it needs to be used correctly – YouTube

“For our second episode we invited German neurobiologist Björn Brembs. In the first part we discussed his scientific background in neurogenetics and research on the fruit fly and snail behaviour. Björn also told us about his way to the Open Science movement. Upon the development of his academic career he realised that there is no digital infrastructure using which he can store his results, data, code and share with other scientists. In addition, he found that the current academic publishing process is fully controlled by the commercial companies. For him Open Science means not only the openness in sharing information, it means the creation of a tool that needs to be used correctly in order to make scientific findings available for everyone.”

From Partisan to Partnership

“In the wake of OA2020 and Plan S, publishers are increasingly under pressure to enter into transformative agreements that transparently shift their business model from subscription to one based on open access publishing services. Embarking on such a transition can be extremely daunting for publishers, considering their rightful concern over long-term economic sustainability. Other issues have also become apparent. Many publishers and libraries lack the business knowledge to match author affiliations with subscription revenues/costs. Large publishers may be ready for a cost-neutral transformative agreement based on per-article charges, but an APC-based model may not work for other publishers/disciplines/institutions. Past attrition rates and subscription price increases have made both publishers and libraries wary. And the historic transactional relationship between publishers and libraries has given little opportunity to develop trust. Yet in recent months, a growing number of publishers have chosen the path of absolute customer engagement and transparency in order to define the terms of a new economic model or transformative agreement. This panel will offer perspectives from successful publisher-library collaborations that have led to forward-looking agreements and new business models. Panellists, comprising sets of publisher-library dyads, will share their insights into how transparency and trust transformed their relationships from partisan contracting parties into collaborative partnerships….”