Position statements | Open science | Elsevier

“Elsevier is actively involved in discussing the key issues on a range of important issues related to scholarly publishing including open access, open data and open science. We are committed to making our written submissions and statements open and transparent for everyone to read….”

Elsevier and open access

“We have now applied for transformative journal status for a large number of journals from across our portfolio. These titles, including many by Cell Press, commit to transformative journal criteria. Please see the full list of transformative journals and visit the relevant individual journal home pages for more information….

Over the past 12 months, Elsevier has formed numerous pilot agreements around the world that support the open science and open access research ambitions of institutions and university consortia.

Each of these agreements is tailored to the specific needs of our partners, ranging from reading and publishing services, to broader areas such as reproducibility, transparency and collaboration in research. Our aim is to test and learn, to better understand how we can support all our customers’ differing needs….

No agreement with Frontiers in Germany | scidecode

“As Bernhard Mittermaier, head of the central library of the Forschungszentrum Jülich, announced yesterday, there will be no agreement with Frontiers in Germany. The negotiations between the Forschungszentrum Jülich and the Open Access Publisher Frontiers on a nationwide framework contract did not succeed….

The criticism on the planned agreement with the Open Access Publisher Frontiers in Germany stemmed from the fact that many German universities and universities of applied sciences have set up Open Access funds funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG) in its program Open Access Publizieren, which reimburse APCs in Gold Open Access Journals up to a maximum of €2000 gross. Many libraries regard this limit as a suitable means of not overburdening their Open Access budget and see it as an opportunity to slow down the price increase of APCs. Two examples of the criticism of the planned Frontiers agreement mentioned by Mr. Mittermaier can be found online, one by Thomas Krichl and one by Michael Wohlgemuth….”

 

No agreement with Frontiers in Germany | scidecode

“As Bernhard Mittermaier, head of the central library of the Forschungszentrum Jülich, announced yesterday, there will be no agreement with Frontiers in Germany. The negotiations between the Forschungszentrum Jülich and the Open Access Publisher Frontiers on a nationwide framework contract did not succeed….

The criticism on the planned agreement with the Open Access Publisher Frontiers in Germany stemmed from the fact that many German universities and universities of applied sciences have set up Open Access funds funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG) in its program Open Access Publizieren, which reimburse APCs in Gold Open Access Journals up to a maximum of €2000 gross. Many libraries regard this limit as a suitable means of not overburdening their Open Access budget and see it as an opportunity to slow down the price increase of APCs. Two examples of the criticism of the planned Frontiers agreement mentioned by Mr. Mittermaier can be found online, one by Thomas Krichl and one by Michael Wohlgemuth….”

 

Texas A&M University Faculty Senate Backs University Libraries

“This year, Texas A&M University Libraries joined 43 Academic Libraries across Texas to create the Texas Library Coalition for United Action (TLCUA). The Coalition hopes to change current publishing models as well as the relationships between academic institutions and publishers, including academic publisher Elsevier.

The University Libraries and TLCUA got a boost on Nov. 9 when the Texas A&M Faculty Senate unanimously passed a formal resolution supporting the negotiations being conducted with Elsevier. The resolution shows that A&M Faculty understand the importance of the work being done to create a more open and sustainable scholarly publishing ecosystem. The resolution also shows that faculty stand prepared for any outcome with the negotiations including the Coalition walking away from negotiations even at the risk of loss of access to current Elsevier content….”

Govt recommends ‘one nation-one subscription’ plan for scientific journals | India News – Times of India

“The Union ministry of science and technology has recommended a ‘one nation-one subscription policy for scientific journals that would allow all universities, research institutions and even individuals in India access to published papers that often have prohibitive costs. The proposal is part of its upcoming Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, 2020 (STIP)….”

UC/Elsevier Negotiations

“Following a series of informal meetings with Elsevier this spring and summer that suggest there may be new potential for progress, UC’s publisher negotiations team has restarted formal negotiations with Elsevier. UC remains committed to its goal of reaching an agreement that provides for open access publishing of UC-authored articles and restores UC’s access to Elsevier journal content, at a reasonable cost….

As each of its multiyear contracts with large scholarly journal publishers comes to an end, the University of California — in close consultation with all 10 campus libraries and the Academic Senate — is working to hold down the rapidly escalating costs associated with for-profit journals and to facilitate open access publishing of UC research.

 

UC’s last contract with Elsevier expired as of January 1, 2019, and Elsevier has discontinued UC’s access via its online platform, ScienceDirect, to articles published since that date (and some older articles). Articles published before 2019 in the vast majority of journals used by UC scholars should continue to be available via ScienceDirect….”

Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies News – Purdue University Libraries in Negotiations with Elsevier

“This past June, we alerted Elsevier that we must reduce Purdue’s total spend on publications by $1.5M.  This reduction is necessary due to the Libraries’ allocated budget and also reflects the need for more fair and equitable pricing.  Purdue pays more for Elsevier subscriptions than many of our peer institutions, and our contracts are based on a complicated and archaic pricing strategy that favors Elsevier while hurting universities like Purdue.  

In July, Elsevier proposed three options for 2021 pricing, none of which met our need for a reduced cost.  We offered a reasonable counter proposal in August, which Elsevier declined to consider. …

If Purdue cannot come to a satisfactory conclusion with Elsevier and reach an agreement which is both affordable and sustainable, we will be forced to significantly reduce the number of journals to which we subscribe.  Over the past few years, some universities have terminated their subscription contracts with Elsevier entirely, and others have greatly reduced their subscription offerings, all due to the inability to arrive at a satisfactory cost agreement.  (See the University of California and the University of North Carolina for recent examples.)  …”

COAPI Community Call: Funding Open During Challenging Budget Times – Oct 26, 2020 – SPARC

“During this call, you will hear about the SPARC Journal Negotiation Community of Practice, including a brief overview of programs and discussion groups developed for libraries in support of their current negotiations and subscription decision-making. The call will then focus in on one of these programs, the Journal Cancellation Reinvestment Working Group. Co-leads, Kathleen DeLaurenti (Johns Hopkins University) and Curtis Brundy (Iowa State University) will describe their efforts leading a community of librarian volunteers developing resources to support libraries prioritizing Open investments.”

Stakeholder alignment in preparation for negotiating open access agreements

“This Community of Practice Call is coordinated by the US OA2020 Working Group for library faculty and staff who wish to learn and share knowledge around the practical aspects of Negotiating and Implementing OA and Transformative Agreements. This third session will focus on strategies to secure stakeholder alignment around transformative and open access agreements.

With the open access transition ushering in a new paradigm in scholarly publishing, the calls are intended to be an opportunity to ask questions, offer expertise garnered through experience, and build a culture of information-sharing within the library community around elements such as stakeholder alignment, data gathering and analysis, library workflows, budgeting, staff organization, metadata standards, value assessment criteria and more….”