Recording the past and the future in 3-D: News at IU: Indiana University

“The handheld scanner looks like an old-school video game controller, a clunky throwback to the early days of Atari. But these mobile 3-D scanners used by the staff in the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library Center for Digital Scholarship are actually very advanced technology, and they are changing the way we record recent history, ancient history and even the future….Proving its place at the front of the 3-D digital archiving crowd, the Center for Digital Scholarship recently received a grant from LYRASIS — a nonprofit organization for information professionals — to develop standards for how digital archives are recorded….”

How expiring patents are ushering in the next generation of 3D printing | TechCrunch

“The year 2016 is quickly shaping up to be one of the hottest years on record for 3D printing innovations. Although there is still a lot of hype surrounding 3D printing and how it may or may not be the next industrial revolution, one thing is for certain: the cost of printing will continue to drop while the quality of 3D prints continues to rise.

This development can be traced to advanced 3D printing technologies becoming accessible due to the expiration of key patents on pre-existing industrial printing processes….”

More 3D Printing Patents Are Expiring Soon: Here’s a Roundup – 3D Printing Industry

“A few years ago, the expiration of many key 3D printing patents had the 3D printing community abuzz.  The 3D printing patents that expired in the 2013-15 timeframe are described here.  At that time, many articles challenged the conventional wisdom that intellectual property drives innovation by creating competition, since the existence of IP forces workarounds.  Those articles argue that patents prevented innovation in 3D printing because the fear of being sued led to a lack of investment in 3D printing R&D, and that patent litigation hindered the adoption of the technology.  The end result, some believe, is that IP creates barriers to entry for new market players, minimizes competition, and keeps prices artificially high.

 

The expiration of several key 3D printing patents in 2013, 2014, and 2015 was supposed to change the industry.  So what happened?  Did the expiration of those patents lead to market growth, reduction in prices, and new products?  Or were other forces, such as the technology itself, holding back new 3D printing technologies?  Are there other 3D printing patents that will expire soon that could have similar effects?  Although it is still too early to give definitive answers to these questions, this article describes developments in the 3D printing industry since the expiration of some of the so-called key patents and discusses 3D printing patents that have or will expire soon….”

ORCA: Open Research Content Archive

“ORCA is a library of professionally-created 3D assets donated to the research community. ORCA enables researchers to develop, test and discover new ideas using challenging, high-quality assets. With initial assets donated by Amazon Lumberyard, SpeedTree, and NVIDIA, we encourage additional 3D asset contributions. …ORCA assets are in FBX format, available for use in any rendering system. Each asset includes a Falcor scene file containing camera and lighting configuration….”

Front-of-neck airway meets front-of-neck simulation: improving cricothyroidotomy skills using a novel open-access three-dimensional model and the Airway App | SpringerLink

The authors designed a 3D artificial trachea to help guide the hands of those performing an emergency cricothyrotomy. Excerpt: “We are pleased to provide our 3D-printable cricothyrotomy file as a free-of-charge download on our website (www.airwaycollaboration.org). We encourage readers to print their own 3D model. We also encourage readers, should they perform an emergency cricothyrotomy, to share their experiences anonymously on the Airway App5 (available free of charge from the Apple App Store or Googleplay) so others can learn from their experiences.”

The Next Generation of 3D Tiles

“Nearly two years ago, we announced the 3D Tiles initiative for streaming massive heterogeneous 3D geospatial datasets. It is amazing and humbling to see how much of it has come to fruition and how a vibrant community has formed around 3D Tiles.

With this initial success, we now have the foundation for modern 3D geospatial: Cesium as the canvas, 3D Tiles as the conduit, and the seemingly endless stream of geospatial data as the supply.

The data acquisition trends are clear: we are collecting more data, more frequently, at a higher resolution and lower cost than ever before, and the data is inherently 3D, driven by heterogeneous sources such as photogrammetry and LIDAR.

The challenge now is to realize the full value of these data. With your help, of course!…”

#NEWPALMYRA

“Collecting data from international partners, analyzing it, creating a reconstruction of Palmyra in virtual space, and sharing the models and data in the public domain. We are using digital tools to preserve heritage sites.

Cultural Development

Hosting live workshops and building a network of artists, technologists, archaeologists, architects, and others to research, construct models, and create artistic works. We create exhibitions and experiences in museums and institutions globally, celebrating the cultural heritage of Syria and the world through the lens of architecture embodying culture and power.

Open Data

Helping to advance open data policies in museums and institutions through advocacy, education, and consultation.

Together with our international affiliates, #NEWPALMYRA sources archaeological and historical data, shares it with the community, and outputs art exhibitions, salons, and creative works using this data to carry the rich history of Palmyra forward to new generations….”