Reflections on trends in library big deals, consortiums and how it might apply to Singapore? | Musings about librarianship

The news that University of California system cancelled their deal with Elsevier seemed to have caused a bit of a stir all over the world, including here in Singapore and I was asked to do a talk to brief faculty on the latest trends in this area.

The more I researched the more interested I got. What were institutions and consortiums doing to better their bargaining position with the big publishers?  Was it all about reducing costs for the “big deals”? How successfully were they?  Lastly to really negotiate with any credibility, you had to be prepared to walk away from the bargaining table and cancel and indeed some consortiums and institutions have done so, how were their users coping?…”

Open data, closed government: Unpacking data.gov.sg | Stevens | First Monday

Abstract:  In 2011, Singapore created data.gov.sg as an open, online repository for government data. This essay examines this Web portal, the data it contains, and some of the applications that have been built using it and aims to understand the role that data.gov.sg plays within the context of Singapore’s continued political and economic development. Although such portals and the data they contain are often presented as offering transformative modes of governance and democratic participation, analysis of data.gov.sg shows how the data portal can act to reinforce and entrench existing modes of governance.

How to succeed as a global innovation hub, Opinion News & Top Stories – The Straits Times

“But funding may be the least of [Japan’s] woes. In an era where open science is becoming a worldwide trend in scientific research, Japan may be missing out due to its deep-rooted country centrism which contrasts sharply with the openness of the top innovative economies, including Singapore….

Its Fifth Science and Technology Basic Plan in 2016 aims to make Japan the “most innovation-friendly country in the world”.

The report acknowledges that Japanese science and technology has been “limited to our national borders and is thus unable to explore its full potential”. It recommends key priorities such as the promotion of open science to better develop and secure intellectual professionals….”

Free articles – accounting for the timing effect

Abstract: “Various studies have attempted to assess the amount of free full text available on the web and recent work have suggested that we are close to the 50% mark for freely available articles (Archambault et al. 2013; Björk et al. 2010; Jamali and Nabavi 2015). Our paper contributes to the literature by taking into account the timing issue by studying when the papers were made free. We sampled citations made by researchers who published in 2015 (based on records in the Singapore Management University Institution repository), checked the number of cited papers that were free at the time of the study and then attempted to “carbon date” the freely available papers to determine when they were first made available. This allows us to estimate the length of time the free cited article was made available before the citing paper was published. We find that in our sample of cited papers in Economics, the median freely available cited paper (oldest variant) was made available 7-8 years before the citing paper was published. Of these papers found free via Google Scholar, the majority 67% (n=47) was made available via University websites (not including Institutional repositories) and 32.8% (n=23) were final published versions.”