Confederation of Open Access Repositories: Annual Meeting and General Assembly

“Fostering Diversity in Scholarly Communication: expanding and strengthening the role of repositories

Diversity is an important characteristic of any healthy ecosystem, including scholarly communications. Diversity in services, platforms, funding mechanisms, and evaluation measures will allow the system to accommodate the needs of different research communities and support a variety of workflows, languages, scholarly outputs, and research topics.

As we continue on the path towards full and immediate open access (and open scholarship more broadly) we must think about how we can create the conditions that allow diversity to exist and flourish. At COAR we recognize and celebrate the diversity of our community. At the same time, we understand that diversity cannot thrive unless it is fostered in an intentional way, through strong coordination.

This meeting will be an opportunity to discuss how we can use the global repository network to support greater diversity, while also supporting the need for an international system. We will learn more about the current context in Latin America, and raise awareness of other approaches being developed around the world….”

Scientists in Germany, Peru and Taiwan to lose access to Elsevier journals : Nature News & Comment

“Thousands of scientists in Germany, Peru and Taiwan are preparing for a new year without online access to journals from the Dutch publishing giant Elsevier. Contract negotiations in both Germany and Taiwan broke down in December, while Peru’s government has cut off funding for a licence….Elsevier and the [German] DEAL consortium, says Hippler, are still far apart with regards to pricing and the OA business model. “Taxpayers have a right to read what they are paying for,” he says. “Publishers must understand that the route to open-access publishing at an affordable price is irreversible.”

In Taiwan, meanwhile, more than 75% of universities, including the country’s top 11 institutions, have joined a collective boycott against Elsevier, says Yan-Jyi Huang, library director at the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (NTUST, also known as Taiwan Tech).

On 7 December, the Taiwanese consortium, CONCERT, which represents more than 140 institutions, announced it would not renew its contract with Elsevier because fees were too high. Elsevier switched to dealing with universities individually. But the NTUST and many others — including Taiwan’s leading research institute, Academia Sinica — have each decided to uphold the boycott, from 1 January 2017….”

Comunicado – Acceso a Literatura Científica hasta 31 Diciembre

From Google Translate’s English translation of an announcement from Peru’s CONCYTEC: “We inform the scientific and academic communication that on December 31 of this year [2016] the subscription to the databases ScienceDirect and Scopus ends.”