Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (Public Lab)

“Public Lab was founded in the wake of the 2010 BP oil disaster. During the spill, there was an information blackout for residents of the coastal region, as well as the rest of the world. No one was accurately tracking what was happening on the ground. In response a group of concerned residents, environmental advocates, designers, and social scientists lofted “community satellites,” made from balloons, kites and digital cameras, over the spill to collect real time data about its impact. Local citizens collected the images, and through a newly created open source platform, contributors stitch over 100,000 aerial images into maps of the coastline before, during, and after the oil spread. These high-resolution maps were featured by BBC and New York Times, among others, allowing residents to speak their truth about what was going on in the Gulf Coast.

The success of the grassroots mapping effort galvanized the group to found Public Lab as a new research and social space for the development of low-cost tools for community-based environmental monitoring and assessment….”

American Gut: an Open Platform for Citizen Science Microbiome Research | mSystems

“Using standardized protocols from the Earth Microbiome Project and sample contributions from over 10,000 citizen-scientists, together with an open research network, we compare human microbiome specimens primarily from the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia to one another and to environmental samples….We also demonstrate the utility of the living data resource and cross-cohort comparison to confirm existing associations between the microbiome and psychiatric illness and to reveal the extent of microbiome change within one individual during surgery, providing a paradigm for open microbiome research and education….

A unique aspect of the AGP is the open community process of assembling the Research Network and analyzing these data, which are released immediately on data generation. Analysis details are shared through a public forum….”

Pitt and UPMC join NIH in launching nationwide precision medicine effort

“On May 6, the National Institutes of Health will open national enrollment for the All of Us Research Program—a momentous effort to advance individualized prevention, treatment and care for people of all backgrounds—in collaboration the University of Pittsburgh and other partners….

Ultimately, the All of Us Research program will be a rich and open data resource for traditional academic researchers as well as citizen scientists.”

CIELO – A Collaborative Informatics Environment for Learning on healthcare Outcomes

“CIELO stands for “Collaborative Informatics Environment for Learning on Health Outcomes” and is a collaborative tool that enables health researchers, data scientists, policy analysts, and citizen scientists to share software and data and connect with peers, colleagues and specialists to improve the timeliness, efficiency and transparency of data analysis….CIELO fosters multi-disciplinary collaboration in health analytics, allowing users to share and collaborate across distributed research activities.

Access health analytics data and code.

Connect with health researchers, policy analysts, informaticians, citizen scientists, and others. … “

About OpenAIRE-Advance

“OpenAIRE-Advance continues the mission of OpenAIRE to support the Open Access/Open Data mandates in Europe. By sustaining the current successful infrastructure, comprised of a human network and robust technical services, it consolidates its achievements while working to shift the momentum among its communities to Open Science, aiming to be a trusted e-Infrastructure within the realms of the European Open Science Cloud.

In this next phase, OpenAIRE-Advance strives  to empower its National Open Access Desks (NOADs) so they become a pivotal part within their own national data infrastructures, positioning OA and open science onto national agendas. The capacity building activities bring together experts on topical task groups in thematic areas (open policies, RDM, legal issues, TDM), promoting a train the trainer approach, strengthening and expanding the pan-European Helpdesk with support and training toolkits, training resources and workshops. It examines key elements of scholarly communication, i.e., co-operative OA publishing and next generation repositories, to develop essential building blocks of the scholarly commons.

On the technical level OpenAIRE-Advance focuses on the operation and maintenance of the OpenAIRE technical TRL8/9 services, and radically improves the OpenAIRE services on offer by: a) optimizing their performance and scalability, b) refining their functionality based on end-user feedback, c) repackaging them into products, taking a professional marketing approach with well-defined KPIs, d) consolidating the range of services/products into a common e-Infra catalogue to enable a wider uptake.

OpenAIREAdvance steps up its outreach activities with concrete pilots with three major RIs, citizen science initiatives, and innovators via a rigorous Open Innovation programme. Finally, viaits partnership with COAR, OpenAIRE-Advance consolidates OpenAIRE’s global roleextending its collaborations with Latin America, US, Japan, Canada, and Africa….”

Open Humans

“Open Humans is a program of the nonprofit Open Humans Foundation and has been funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Knight Foundation. Our 2015 launch was written up in Forbes, Newsweek, Scientific American, and more.

You decide when to share. You have valuable data, and you’ll decide when to share it. The data you provide will be private by default. You can choose which projects to share with. You can also opt to make some (or all) of your data public, so anyone can access and research it!

Studies, projects, and more. Browse our activities list to see the many potential data sources you can add, and interesting projects you can join.

Be a part of research. We’ll recognize your contributions with badges on your profile page, invite you to talk to other community members in our online forums, and periodically post new activities, study updates, and relevant interviews in our newsletters and on our blog….”

Conducting scientific research outside traditional settings – timesofmalta.com

“While the rise of crowd-funded science projects, open-access science initiatives and open-access publications make the scientific environment friendlier for citizen scientists, many traditional scientific practices remain out of reach for those without sufficient funds or institutional support – for example, studies involving human participants. Community-supported checks and balances remain essential for scientific projects, but perhaps they too can become unbound from traditional academic settings.”

Scientists Could Learn an Important Lesson From Trump’s Victory

“Luckily, scientists and other experts are now equipped with ways to meaningfully engage with everyday people, citizen science being an important one. Distributed throughout the country without regard to politics, economics, or other divisive categories, citizen science groups and projects can help close the gap between professional scientists and the public. Citizen science can bring political diversity to scientific culture and produce open knowledge that is useful to public and private research interests. And when public engagement goes beyond data collection -as vital as that is for science and education-citizens can add their voices as input to decisions about issues that can affect their lives….”