Trends, challenges and opportunities for LIS education: an interview with Carol Tenopir | Library Connect

“[Q] How will open science influence LIS education?

 
[A] LIS education needs to address how open science issues, including open access and open data, affect scholarship, scholars and, ultimately, science and society. For example, there is the human side that involves helping researchers learn about and participate in the process, while recognizing their concerns. Librarians also need the technical skills to provide metadata services, manage institutional repositories and assist with research data management to further the open science practices at their institutions. Researchers are faced with funding and governmental regulations requiring deposition of data and articles in repositories. Information science professionals can help this happen by providing either repositories or links to repositories and helping researchers with the processes needed to deposit. Preservation is an important part of this as well. And the need for education about high-quality sources never goes away.”

 

Extracting research evidence from publications | EMBL-EBI Train online

“Extracting research evidence from publications Bioinformaticians are routinely handling big data, including DNA, RNA, and protein sequence information. It’s time to treat biomedical literature as a dataset and extract valuable facts hidden in the millions of scientific papers. This webinar demonstrates how to access text-mined literature evidence using Europe PMC Annotations API. We highlight several use cases, including linking diseases with potential treatment targets, or identifying which protein structures are cited along with a gene mutation.

This webinar took place on 5 March 2018 and is for wet-lab researchers and bioinformaticians who want to access scientific literature and data programmatically. Some prior knowledge of programmatic access and common programming languages is recommended.

The webinar covers: Available data (annotation types and sources) (1:50) API operations and parameters and web service outputs (8:08) Use case examples (16:56) How to get help (24:16)

You can download the slides from this webinar here. You can learn more about Europe PMC in our Europe PMC: Quick tour and our previous webinar Europe PMC, programmatically.

For documentation, help and support visit the Europe PMC help pages or download the developer friendly web service guide. For web service related question you can get in touch via the Google group or contact the helpdesk [at] europepmc.org”>help desk.”

SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATIONS CORE COMPETENCIES TASK FORCE

“o develop a statement for NASIG’s endorsement that describes core competencies for librarians whose professional responsibilities include a large component of work in the highly collaborative environment related to digital scholarship and scholarly communications. The purpose of this/these statements is to provide librarian educators with a basis for developing curriculum with a specialized focus and to provide employers with a basis for describing these specialized positions and with criteria upon which to evaluate the performance of those who hold them. The statement will be based on current research and complement ALA’s Core Competences for Librarianship. The statement will also be flexible enough to remain relevant in the face of constant change and advances in technology as it is applied to digital scholarship and scholarly communication.The Scholarly Communications Core Competencies Task Force will develop a statement for NASIG’s endorsement that describes core competencies for librarians in scholarly communications….”

SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATIONS CORE COMPETENCIES TASK FORCE

“o develop a statement for NASIG’s endorsement that describes core competencies for librarians whose professional responsibilities include a large component of work in the highly collaborative environment related to digital scholarship and scholarly communications. The purpose of this/these statements is to provide librarian educators with a basis for developing curriculum with a specialized focus and to provide employers with a basis for describing these specialized positions and with criteria upon which to evaluate the performance of those who hold them. The statement will be based on current research and complement ALA’s Core Competences for Librarianship. The statement will also be flexible enough to remain relevant in the face of constant change and advances in technology as it is applied to digital scholarship and scholarly communication.The Scholarly Communications Core Competencies Task Force will develop a statement for NASIG’s endorsement that describes core competencies for librarians in scholarly communications….”