Online Short-Seminar: Research Management with Open Science Framework – Countway LibCal – Harvard Library. Countway Library of Medicine

“The Open Science Framework (OSF) is a free, open source project management tool to help scholars manage their workflow, organize their materials, and share all or part of a project with the broader research community. The tool connects to many other tools researchers often use such as: GitHub, Dropbox, ORCID, Zotero, Dataverse, and many more.

This workshop will provide a foundation for incorporating reproducible, transparent practices into your current workflows. We will demonstrate some of the key functionalities of the tool including how to structure your materials, manage permissions, version content, integrate with third-party tools, share materials, and track usage.

Learning Objectives: 

Learn how OSF facilitates reproducible research practices
Demonstrate some of the key functionalities of OSF
Apply OSF as a tool for best practices in data management
Find out where to get help or assistance …”

ODI Fridays: Enabling data sharing with the Data Pitch Toolkit – The ODI

“Through the increase of data science techniques, not least Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), the value and role of data as an asset becomes ever more crucial. This has made it more important for data to be accessible. However, much of the data that many solutions require are held within private organisations – and are only available if they are shared.

The Data Pitch Data Sharing Toolkit helps organisations that want to generate value by sharing data or facilitating data sharing. It been pulled together from experience collected on several projects and initiatives, including, but not limited to, the Data Pitch innovation programme.

The toolkit explains the concept, challenges, and processes to enable successful data sharing, and provide resources and recommendations to make data sharing successful in practice. The talk will give a flavour of the toolkit and the insights it was developed from, focussing on how data sharing works in practice, which challenges organisations should be prepared for, and how to overcome them.”

ODI Fridays: Enabling data sharing with the Data Pitch Toolkit – The ODI

“Through the increase of data science techniques, not least Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), the value and role of data as an asset becomes ever more crucial. This has made it more important for data to be accessible. However, much of the data that many solutions require are held within private organisations – and are only available if they are shared.

The Data Pitch Data Sharing Toolkit helps organisations that want to generate value by sharing data or facilitating data sharing. It been pulled together from experience collected on several projects and initiatives, including, but not limited to, the Data Pitch innovation programme.

The toolkit explains the concept, challenges, and processes to enable successful data sharing, and provide resources and recommendations to make data sharing successful in practice. The talk will give a flavour of the toolkit and the insights it was developed from, focussing on how data sharing works in practice, which challenges organisations should be prepared for, and how to overcome them.”

Open Scholarship Knowledge Base

“A project

The Open Scholarship Knowledge Base is a collaborative initiative to curate and share knowledge about the what, why, and how of open scholarship. This includes reviewing, consolidating, organizing, and improving the discoverability of content to support the education and application of open practices for all aspects of the research lifecycle.

A community

Spearheaded by volunteers, the Open Scholarship Knowledge Base is a community of diverse individuals aligned by a shared goal to make learning and applying open research practices easier. It is being built by and for the community it aims to serve. Researchers, teachers, funders, librarians, and anyone wanting to open scholarship are welcome to edit, curate, and contribute to this community resource.

Join the community by contributing your favorite content to the OSKB through this content submission form!

A platform

Educational content (tutorials, workshop materials, videos, papers, and more) generated by the many contributors to open scholarship across disciplines and regions will be curated and maintained as openly accessible modules and trainings. For example, a user can discover content about data sharing that relates to their discipline, role, and data characteristics, and follow self-guided learning pathways on why and how to share their data….”

Open Scholarship Knowledge Base

“A project

The Open Scholarship Knowledge Base is a collaborative initiative to curate and share knowledge about the what, why, and how of open scholarship. This includes reviewing, consolidating, organizing, and improving the discoverability of content to support the education and application of open practices for all aspects of the research lifecycle.

A community

Spearheaded by volunteers, the Open Scholarship Knowledge Base is a community of diverse individuals aligned by a shared goal to make learning and applying open research practices easier. It is being built by and for the community it aims to serve. Researchers, teachers, funders, librarians, and anyone wanting to open scholarship are welcome to edit, curate, and contribute to this community resource.

Join the community by contributing your favorite content to the OSKB through this content submission form!

A platform

Educational content (tutorials, workshop materials, videos, papers, and more) generated by the many contributors to open scholarship across disciplines and regions will be curated and maintained as openly accessible modules and trainings. For example, a user can discover content about data sharing that relates to their discipline, role, and data characteristics, and follow self-guided learning pathways on why and how to share their data….”

Making (neuro)science accessible world-wide: Online seminars for the globe | Labs | eLife

“Initially aimed at the community of theorists, World Wide Neuro (Fig. 2) quickly grew to become a wider-scope repository for openly accessible and free-to-join online seminar announcements. The seminars we announce are organised autonomously by hosts from institutions all across the world, and cover a wide range of topics in neuroscience. In the early days after launching the site, we saw the creation of new seminar series: in Neurodevelopment, Vision research, and Invertebrate Neuroecology. These were created by group leaders and postdoctoral researchers who saw the opportunity to bring together a group of speakers for whom they would normally not have had the financial resources. Since then, other series have joined, e.g. NERV: a student-driven initiative from the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. More established seminar series have also started to post. Some of the existing series retain access “by registration only”, but this is something that we try to discourage as it creates unnecessary access barriers. After initial issues with Zoom bombing were fixed, we feel this restriction is no longer necessary….”

Guide and Toolbox to Replicability and Open Science in Entomology | Journal of Insect Science | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  The ability to replicate scientific experiments is a cornerstone of the scientific method. Sharing ideas, workflows, data, and protocols facilitates testing the generalizability of results, increases the speed that science progresses, and enhances quality control of published work. Fields of science such as medicine, the social sciences, and the physical sciences have embraced practices designed to increase replicability. Granting agencies, for example, may require data management plans and journals may require data and code availability statements along with the deposition of data and code in publicly available repositories. While many tools commonly used in replicable workflows such as distributed version control systems (e.g., ‘git’) or script programming languages for data cleaning and analysis may have a steep learning curve, their adoption can increase individual efficiency and facilitate collaborations both within entomology and across disciplines. The open science movement is developing within the discipline of entomology, but practitioners of these concepts or those desiring to work more collaboratively across disciplines may be unsure where or how to embrace these initiatives. This article is meant to introduce some of the tools entomologists can incorporate into their workflows to increase the replicability and openness of their work. We describe these tools and others, recommend additional resources for learning more about these tools, and discuss the benefits to both individuals and the scientific community and potential drawbacks associated with implementing a replicable workflow.

 

Welcome to GLAM 3D | GLAM 3D Engelberg Center

“If you are thinking about starting a 3D Open Access program you have come to the right place!

This site will walk you through the entire process of planning, creating, and launching an Open Access 3D scanning program. It is designed to have something for everyone, from 3D beginners to 3D experts.

Glam3D.org is an open resource that welcomes contributions and suggestions from the community.”

 

Marking Open and Affordable Courses: Best Practices and Case Studies – Simple Book Publishing

“This collaboratively authored guide helps institutions navigate the uncharted waters of tagging course material as open educational resources (OER) or under a low-cost threshold by summarizing relevant state legislation, providing tips for working with stakeholders, and analyzing technological and process considerations. The first half of the book provides high-level analysis of the technology, legislation, and cultural change needed to operationalize course markings. The second half features case studies by Alexis Clifton, Rebel Cummings-Sauls, Michael Daly, Juville Dario-Becker, Tony DeFranco, Cindy Domaika, Ann Fiddler, Andrea Gillaspy Steinhilper, Rajiv Jhangiani, Brian Lindshield, Andrew McKinney, Nathan Smith, and Heather White.”