Data Management UKRN workshop

“We are offering a one-day short course on data management skills for Open Research online in November 2020. It is open to researchers at all career stages, and across all quantitative disciplines in the biomedical sciences (broadly defined). The workshop is free, supported by Cancer Research UK. We especially encourage researchers funded by CRUK to apply. The course aims to teach researchers how to make their work more reproducible, open and robust through the use of data management tools such as R and Git. Attendees will come away with an overview of how open/reproducible data pipelines work, and why they are important, as well as hands-on experience delving into specific tools. The workshop will include four main components:…”

FORRT – Framework for Open and Reproducible Research Training

“In a nutshell, FORRT is a Framework for Open and Reproducible Research Training. It aims to provide a pedagogical infrastructure designed to recognize and support the teaching and mentoring of open and reproducible science tenets in tandem with prototypical subject matters in higher education. FORRT strives to be an effective, evolving, and community-driven organization raising awareness of the pedagogical implications of open and reproducible science and its associated challenges (i.e., curricular reform, epistemological uncertainty, methods of education). FORRT also advocates for the opening of teaching and mentoring materials as a means to facilitate access, discovery, and learning to those who otherwise would be educationally disenfranchised….”

Charting a path to a more open future. . . together – Hanging Together

“Last week, representatives from OCLC Research and LIBER (the Association of European Research Libraries) presented a webinar to kick off the OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion Series. This discussion series, which takes place from 24 September through 5 November 2020, is based upon the LIBER Open Science Roadmap, and will help guide research libraries in envisioning the support infrastructure for Open Science (OS) and their role at local, national, and global levels.

OCLC and LIBER had initially planned a collaborative in-person workshop to take place at the OCLC Library Futures Conference (EMEARC 2020) on March 3 in Vienna. But with COVID rapidly advancing globally at that time, the event was cancelled, and we took some time to plan a larger series of webinars and discussions. 

There are a couple of key goals for our collaboration. First of all, our organizations want to jointly offer a forum for discussion and exploration, and to collectively stimulate the exchange of ideas. But secondly, we want this activity to also inform us as we seek to identify research questions that OCLC and LIBER can collaboratively address to advance Open Science. 

The LIBER Open Science Roadmap provides an excellent, well. . . roadmap. . . for this effort. The report calls upon libraries to “advocate for Open Science locally and internationally, to support Open Science through tools and services and to expand the impact of their work through collaboration and partnerships.” …”

Copyright life hacks for librarians

Abstract:  Librarians are continuously looking for new ways to make the training they offer accessible and engaging to both colleagues and users. One area where this is especially important is copyright – a topic many librarians identify as vital to their role, but they often find it hard to attend training. Cambridge University Libraries has introduced a range of methods to reach out to even the most reluctant copyright learner and improve the overall copyright literacy of its staff. This article showcases these methods in the form of ‘life hacks’ – simple measures which can be implemented with little or no cost and using existing resources.

 

Methods outlined include making the best use of knowledge already present within your organisation, using visual methods to attract a new audience and creating interactive online resources. Also discussed is the importance of making copyright training accessible, both to users with disabilities and those who may have constraints on their time and technological ability. The article concludes with a reflection about the challenges faced whilst creating new resources. The techniques outlined in this case study can be adapted for use by a range of libraries no matter the target audience.

Open Science Training: How to Implement Methods and Practices in European Research Libraries | ZBW MediaTalk

“How can the principles of Open Science be implemented in European research libraries to enable world-class research? A LIBER working group has addressed this question and developed appropriate training methods and practices. Cécile Swiatek was one of the persons who led the working group and presents the results in an interview. She also tells us why libraries are perfectly suited to play a key role in the change towards an open culture and why it is so important to build networks and share knowledge in this process….”

Open Science Training: How to Implement Methods and Practices in European Research Libraries | ZBW MediaTalk

“How can the principles of Open Science be implemented in European research libraries to enable world-class research? A LIBER working group has addressed this question and developed appropriate training methods and practices. Cécile Swiatek was one of the persons who led the working group and presents the results in an interview. She also tells us why libraries are perfectly suited to play a key role in the change towards an open culture and why it is so important to build networks and share knowledge in this process….”

Innovation Leaders 2020: A summary | Labs | eLife

“The mission of the eLife Innovation Initiative is to support a community of open innovators who are developing tools to change the ways we discover, consume, evaluate and share research. Through organising the eLife Innovation Sprint and participating in other community events, we have seen a wealth of ideas and prototypes supporting these goals, but we’ve also realised that many of these projects are often not sustained beyond the Sprint events at which they are conceived.

This motivated us to start our eLife Innovation Leaders programme, a five-month open leadership training and mentorship course designed to empower innovators in the open-source-for-open-science community, to help them to lead and develop their tools and projects openly, and to think more strategically about long term project sustainability. The curriculum covered key topics in project ideation, launch and growth, such as design thinking, user research, prototyping, team building and marketing. We believe that projects are more likely to be sustainable when they are “open by design”– that they encompass carefully-designed processes for others to contribute to, and collaboratively develop, the project together.”

Integrating FAIR Data Science Competences in Higher Education Curricula: The Role of Academic and Research Libraries  | FAIRsFAIR

“Our point of departure for the workshop was to present the findings from FAIRsFAIR survey activites conducted by the European University Association (EUA) in collaboration with partners of the FAIRsFAIR project during 2019 to investigate the extent to which FAIR research data management principles are present in university curricula. These findings and the related recommendations are documented in the recently published report D7.1 FAIR in Higher Education.  For easy reference, a quick graphic overview of the report is provided at this webpage. 

The findings most pertinent to workshop participants include:

Awareness of the FAIR principles is considered high among professional and support staff (e.g. data stewards, librarians), moderate among the institutional leadership, but still rather low among researchers and especially students.
Higher education institutions are increasingly aware of the need to integrate digital skills into their curricula. Only 38% of respondents to this question stated that their organisation had a related strategy in place at institutional or departmental level – or both. However 31% stated that although there was no strategy yet in place, their institution was developing one.
The extent to which data science skills are currently being addressed in university teaching is reported to be rather low overall at the bachelor and master level and moderate at the doctoral level. Respondents expressed an urgent need to strengthen the teaching of data-related competences at all three levels. …”

How can I get access to the article I need? | EIFL

“In order to help researchers retrieve legal copies of full-text articles that they can’t find in their library, EIFL has created a poster with useful links to other places where they can look for an article they need, such as open access search engines or browser extensions.

We are encouraging librarians to share the poster widely with faculty and students through their university and institutional websites, newsletters and social media. EIFL can help libraries customize the poster, for example, by adding the library’s logo and links to the library’s subscribed e-resources.”