Open Access to Research Data in H2020

“This presentation provides an introduction to the Open Research Data Pilot in Horizon 2020. It explains why research data management and open data are important, what the requirements of the open research data pilot are and how OpenAIRE can help you to manage your data, open it up and comply with your funders open research data policy. 

– EC guidelines on open research data for H2020 project including the H2020 DMP template http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/grants_manual/hi/oa_pilot/h2020-hi-oa-data-mgt_en.pdf 
– Online DMP tool with a template for H2020 projects https://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk/ 
– How to comply with the H2020 Open Research data requirements https://www.openaire.eu/how-to-comply-to-h2020-mandates-for-publications-2 
– What is a data management plan and how to write one? https://www.openaire.eu/what-isa-data-management-plan-and-how-do-i-create-one 
– For further questions and help, contact us at: https://www.openaire.eu/support/helpdesk 
– For further information, check: https://www.openaire.eu/ …”

Evaluate your RDM Offering – SPARC Europe

“For institutions that have implemented an RDM policy, a natural next step is to evaluate one’s efforts. To that end, SPARC Europe has created a new tool that will enable you to assess various aspects of your RDM initiative, specifically, how you are contributing to optimising and professionalising research data management (RDM): policy, services and infrastructure at your institution….

This tool is based on the SPARC Europe How Open is your Research service and on the work of the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and its RISE Framework….

The tool aims to help institutions develop a strategy for an improved research data management policy and service infrastructure To get the most out of it, we suggest experimenting with it and using it as a basis for discussion with colleagues. This should help you better understand perceptions of your current RDM policy and service offering amongst a range of institutional stakeholders. Research intensive universities active in RDM will have the most benefit….

The tool is free to use. Our only request is that you tell us a bit about yourself so that we understand who finds it most useful….”

The University of Chicago selects TIND IR and TIND RDM

“TIND was selected by the University of Chicago to provide their cloud-based TIND Institutional Repository (TIND IR) and TIND Research Data Management (TIND RDM). TIND’s systems were chosen in order to better meet growing needs and interests around data sharing and preservation, open access, and reproducible research results. UChicago is migrating its existing research output from DSpace Direct. …”

NOT-OD-19-014: Request for Information (RFI) on Proposed Provisions for a Draft Data Management and Sharing Policy for NIH Funded or Supported Research

“The purpose of this Notice is to solicit public input on proposed key provisions that could serve as a foundation for a future NIH policy for data management and sharing….”

The University of Cambridge, SPARC Europe and Jisc announce winner of the Data Engagement Management Award

“The very first Data Management Engagement Award, a competition sponsored by SPARC Europe, the University of Cambridge and Jisc to elicit new and imaginative ideas for engaging researchers in the practices of good Research Data Management (RDM).

The accepted proposal is to link RDM with the open science movement via the Wikimedia suite of tools….”

Impact of Social Sciences – What factors do scientists perceive as promoting or hindering scientific data reuse?

“Increased calls for data sharing have formed part of many governments’ agendas to boost innovation and scientific development. Data openness for reuse also resonates with the recognised need for more transparent, reproducible science. But what are scientists’ perceptions about data reuse? Renata Gonçalves Curty, Kevin Crowston, Alison Specht, Bruce W. Grant and Elizabeth D. Dalton make use of existing survey data to analyse the attitudes and norms affecting scientists’ data reuse. Perceived efficiency, efficacy, and trustworthiness are key; as is whether scientists believe data reuse is beneficial for scientific development, or perceive certain pressures contrary to the reuse of data. Looking ahead, synthesis centres can be important for supporting data-driven interdisciplinary collaborations, and leveraging new scientific discoveries based on pre-existing data….”

Trends, challenges and opportunities for LIS education: an interview with Carol Tenopir | Library Connect

“[Q] How will open science influence LIS education?

 
[A] LIS education needs to address how open science issues, including open access and open data, affect scholarship, scholars and, ultimately, science and society. For example, there is the human side that involves helping researchers learn about and participate in the process, while recognizing their concerns. Librarians also need the technical skills to provide metadata services, manage institutional repositories and assist with research data management to further the open science practices at their institutions. Researchers are faced with funding and governmental regulations requiring deposition of data and articles in repositories. Information science professionals can help this happen by providing either repositories or links to repositories and helping researchers with the processes needed to deposit. Preservation is an important part of this as well. And the need for education about high-quality sources never goes away.”

 

Long-term Sustainability of Research Infrastructures: Science Europe’s Offer to Contribute to Ongoing Efforts

“Recommendations 24 to 27 encourage the use of RIs [research infrastructures] to enhance data production and sharing. Science Europe supports this principle: as the move towards openness continues to develop through policies such as the Open Science agenda, many RFOs [research funding organizations] and RPOs [research performing organizations] have formulated policies, requirements, and templates for research data management (RDM) and data management plans (DMPs). Science Europe advocates for international alignment of RDM policies by exploring ways to establish core RDM requirements.3 As various research communities become increasingly data-intensive or highly protocolled, this would allow for an optimal creation, curation, and re-use of data to advance technological and societal developments.”