Electronic Lab Notebooks | Harvard Biomedical Data Management

Lab notebooks are good for writing down procedures, observations, conclusions and for drawing flow charts and diagrams by hand. However, in order to accommodate the increase of digital data collected, researchers have taped instrumentation and computer printouts onto the pages of their notebooks, or cross-referenced larger data sets by recording file names and locations in the notebook.

An ELN (electronic lab notebook) is a software tool that in its most basic form replicates an interface much like a page in a paper lab notebook. In this electronic notebook you can enter protocols, observations, notes, and other data using your computer or mobile device. This offers several advantages over the traditional paper notebook.

The number of available ELN tools is increasing and the functions of each are quickly changing. As a result, it may be confusing to evaluate all of the advantages and limitations of each when looking for the right solution for your project.

The Electronic Lab Notebook Matrix has been created to aid HMS researchers in the process of identifying a usable Electronic Lab Notebook solutions to meet their specific research needs. Through this resource, researchers can compare and contrast the numerous solutions available today, and also explore individual options in-depth….”

Open science: European universities have more homework to do on data handling | Science|Business

“According to the latest data from the European University Association (EUA), only 21 per cent of surveyed higher education institutions have policies on research data management in place. Another 38 per cent of universities were in the process of developing them. However, almost 40 per cent reported that they lacked or were not in the process of developing such policies.”

Open Access in the humanities made concrete: highlights from the ‘How to make the most of your publications in the humanities?’ workshop – DARIAH Open

“With all things changing for the open in both research policies and practices, there is a growing demand for support enabling humanities scholars to get open innovation rooted in our everyday research practices. To this end, DARIAH and FOSTER Plus brought together humanities researchers from different fields and at different career stages and Open Science experts with domain-specific knowledge to spend a foggy winter day in Berlin and engage in dialogues about trends, innovations, and present-day challenges in opening up scholarly communication in the humanities….”

Scholarly Communication and Open Access in Psychology: Current Considerations for Researchers

Abstract:  Scholarly communication and open access practices in psychological science are rapidly evolving. However, most published works that focus on scholarly communication issues do not target the specific discipline, and instead take a more “one size fits all” approach. When it comes to scholarly communication, practices and traditions vary greatly across the disciplines. It is important to look at issues such as open access (of all types), reproducibility, research data management, citation metrics, the emergence of preprint options, the evolution of new peer review models, coauthorship conventions, and use of scholarly networking sites such as ResearchGate and Academia.edu from a disciplinary perspective. Important issues in scholarly publishing for psychology include uptake of authors’ use of open access megajournals, how open science is represented in psychology journals, challenges of interdisciplinarity, and how authors avail themselves of green and gold open access strategies. This overview presents a discipline-focused treatment of selected scholarly communication topics that will allow psychology researchers and others to get up to speed on this expansive topic. Further study into researcher behavior in terms of scholarly communication in psychology would create more understanding of existing culture as well as provide early career researchers with a more effective roadmap to the current landscape. As no other single work provides a study of scholarly communication and open access in psychology, this work aims to partially fill that niche.

PRACTICAL GUIDE TO THE INTERNATIONAL ALIGNMENT OF RESEARCH DATA MANAGEMENT

“At the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) Summit in June 2017, I made a commitment to champion the alignment of research data management (RDM) among research funding organisations in Europe. This commitment was the origin of an initiative for that purpose, launched by Science Europe and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) in January 2018. The aim of the initiative was to develop a set of core requirements for data management plans (DMPs), as well as a list of criteria for the selection of trustworthy repositories where researchers can store their data for sharing. In light of the development of the EOSC and an increasing tendency towards data sharing, these requirements and criteria should help to harmonise rules on data management throughout Europe. This will aid researchers in complying with RDM requirements even when working with different research funders and research organisations. Less than a year after its launch, I am pleased to introduce the results of this endeavour. These core requirements for DMPs and criteria for the selection of trustworthy repositories have been developed by experts from Science Europe’s Member Organisations, who have sought additional input from external stakeholders to ensure a broad consensus….”

Open Access to Research Data in H2020

“This presentation provides an introduction to the Open Research Data Pilot in Horizon 2020. It explains why research data management and open data are important, what the requirements of the open research data pilot are and how OpenAIRE can help you to manage your data, open it up and comply with your funders open research data policy. 

– EC guidelines on open research data for H2020 project including the H2020 DMP template http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/grants_manual/hi/oa_pilot/h2020-hi-oa-data-mgt_en.pdf 
– Online DMP tool with a template for H2020 projects https://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk/ 
– How to comply with the H2020 Open Research data requirements https://www.openaire.eu/how-to-comply-to-h2020-mandates-for-publications-2 
– What is a data management plan and how to write one? https://www.openaire.eu/what-isa-data-management-plan-and-how-do-i-create-one 
– For further questions and help, contact us at: https://www.openaire.eu/support/helpdesk 
– For further information, check: https://www.openaire.eu/ …”

Evaluate your RDM Offering – SPARC Europe

“For institutions that have implemented an RDM policy, a natural next step is to evaluate one’s efforts. To that end, SPARC Europe has created a new tool that will enable you to assess various aspects of your RDM initiative, specifically, how you are contributing to optimising and professionalising research data management (RDM): policy, services and infrastructure at your institution….

This tool is based on the SPARC Europe How Open is your Research service and on the work of the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and its RISE Framework….

The tool aims to help institutions develop a strategy for an improved research data management policy and service infrastructure To get the most out of it, we suggest experimenting with it and using it as a basis for discussion with colleagues. This should help you better understand perceptions of your current RDM policy and service offering amongst a range of institutional stakeholders. Research intensive universities active in RDM will have the most benefit….

The tool is free to use. Our only request is that you tell us a bit about yourself so that we understand who finds it most useful….”