Open Access in Konstanz | Friedrichshafen | SWR Aktuell | SWR.de

from Google tranlate: “The Administrative Court in Mannheim is concerned on Tuesday with a complaint by professors of the University of Konstanz. The question is whether and when research should be made available free of charge.”

Danes step away from patenting in favour of ‘open science’

Denmark’s top-ranked higher education institution is to shift away from patenting research conducted in partnership with the private sector to pursue an open science model.

Aarhus University’s new initiative, called Open Science, does not allow either the university or the companies involved to patent any discoveries made during the research process and, at the end, the results are disclosed to everyone – even other firms – in what it calls a “patent-free playground”.

Implementing open access mandates in Europe

“The implementation of open access policies in Europe is a socio-technical undertaking whereby a wide range of stakeholders work together to bring out the benefits of open access for European and global research. This work provides a unique overview of national awareness of open access in 32 European countries involving all EU member states and in addition, Norway, Iceland, Croatia, Switzerland and Turkey. It describes funder and institutional open access mandates in Europe and national strategies to introduce and implement them. An overview of the current European repository infrastructures is given, including institutional and disciplinary repositories, national repository networks, information portals and support networks. This work also outlines OpenAIREplus, a continuation project which aims to widen the scope of OpenAIRE by connecting publications to contextual information, such as research data and funding information. Opportunities for collaboration in order to achieve European and global synergies are also highlighted. The OpenAIRE project, a joint collaboration among 38 partners from 27 European countries, has built up a network of open repositories providing free online access to knowledge produced by researchers receiving grants from the European Commission or the European Research Council. It provides support structures for researchers, operates an electronic infrastructure and a portal to access all user-level services and works with several subject communities. Birgit Schmidt is affi liated with Goettingen State and University Library. Iryna Kuchma is affiliated with EIFL.”

Passing a Campus Open Access Policy – OpenCon

“On March 31, Florida Gulf Coast University’s (FGCU) Faculty Senate passed an Open Access policy! The Open Access Archiving Policy ensures that future scholarly articles authored by FGCU faculty will be made freely available to the public by requiring faculty to deposit copies of their accepted manuscripts in the university’s repository, DigitalFGCU.”

Impact of Social Sciences – Are universities finally waking up to the value of copyright?

“Following in the footsteps of the ‘Harvard-style’ open access policies that have proved so popular in the US, Imperial College are now heading up the development of a UK version, which would give UK universities a non-exclusive licence to make their academics’ work available in their institutional repositories, under a CC BY-NC licence, and on the date of publication. It is early days for this initiative, but it would seem to offer the best opportunity so far for enabling the retention of copyright by academia for academia. Perhaps, at long last, copyright in scholarly outputs will remain with those who both create and consume them….”

Opening Doors with Open Data | UWire

“Stores of data are growing so quickly that we now create as much data in two days as the entirety of mankind did up until 2013. Now that we have the power to collect data, what are we doing with it?”

Campus open-access policy “Choice Points”

“The basic policy framework recommended in this document highlights the institution’s ability to play a central role in the stewardship of the scholarly record generated by its faculty. The framework is straightforward; campus OA policies require authors to make manuscripts available for deposit in an institution’s repository at the time they are accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Authors automatically grant the institution the right to make their manuscripts openly accessible. At the same time, authors may request a waiver, or “opt out,” of the institutional license for a given article if needed to accommodate a pressing individual circumstance….”