Open access and author rights: questioning Harvard’s open access policy

Harvard’s open access (OA) policy, which has become a template for many institutional OA policies, intrinsically undermines the rights of scholars, researchers, authors and university staff, and it adulterates a principal tenet of open access, namely, that authors should control the intellectual property rights to their material. Assessing the implications of Harvard’s open access policy in the light of Peter Suber’s landmark book, Open Access, as well as resources from the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and Title 17 of the United States Code (USC), this article uncovers an intellectual ‘landgrab’ by universities that may at times not work in the interest of the author or creator of research and weakens the appeal of open access.

From Idea to Policy: How Do United States R-1 Universities Advance Open Access Scholarly Communication at an Institutional Level? – ProQuest

“U.S. universities are increasingly unable to afford research journal subscriptions due to the rising prices charged by for-profit academic publishers. Open Access appears to be the most backed option to disrupt the current publishing model. However, only about seventy-six U.S. universities/colleges have developed and implemented institutional Open Access policies at this time. The purpose of this study is to understand how selected United States R-1 universities advance Open Access at the institutional level, by investigating how these institutions develop, implement, support, and measure their Open Access Policy efforts. An in-depth qualitative study, including interviews with stakeholders and examination of artifacts, was performed on two R-1universities with Open Access policies that have been implemented for at least five years. The results of this study reveal that an institutional Open Access policy could begin at the university senior administration level or at the faculty level. Dissemination of knowledge and reducing costs were two of the primary motivators for the development of the policies, but only the former reason was explicitly stated and promoted. A lack of definitions for the progress and success of the policies’ implementation has hindered their impact. In summary, there was a tacit acknowledgement that the policies were symbolic and goodwill gestures rather than enforceable mandates.”

bjoern.brembs.blog » How academic institutions neglect their duty

“As the technology for such an infrastructure is available off the shelf and institutions are spending multiple amounts of what would be required on legacy publishers, there remain only social obstacles as to why academic institutions keep neglecting their researchers. Given that institutions have now failed for about 30 years to overcome these obstacles, it is straightforward to propose that mandates and policies be put in place to force institutions (and not researchers!) to change their ways and implement such a basic infrastructure.”

Brock University Open Access Policy – Brock University Library

“1. Brock University recognizes the importance of sharing the products of research and scholarship as widely as possible.

2. Brock University is committed to providing an Open Access Repository optimized for the online discoverability, preservation and dissemination of research; and to providing the appropriate supports, including publishing and author rights consultation services, to enable its full utilization.

3. Brock Scholars are expected to deposit an electronic copy of their academic journal articles in Brock’s Open Access Repository (“Brock University Digital Repository”) by the date of publication. If needed, articles may be embargoed within the repository upon deposit to meet time periods required by publishers.

4. Each Brock Scholar who deposits their academic journal articles in the Brock University Digital Repository grants the University the non-exclusive permission to archive and disseminate those articles through the Repository, provided that the articles are properly attributed to the authors, and that dissemination is for non-commercial purposes only.

5. Brock Scholars who choose not to deposit an academic journal article in the Brock University Digital Repository shall notify the University Library through the opt-out form made available through the Brock University Library….”

Meta-Research: Evaluating the impact of open access policies on research institutions | eLife

Abstract:The proportion of research outputs published in open access journals or made available on other freely-accessible platforms has increased over the past two decades, driven largely by funder mandates, institutional policies, grass-roots advocacy, and changing attitudes in the research community. However, the relative effectiveness of these different interventions has remained largely unexplored. Here we present a robust, transparent and updateable method for analysing how these interventions affect the open access performance of individual institutes. We studied 1,207 institutions from across the world, and found that, in 2017, the top-performing universities published around 80-90% of their research open access. The analysis also showed that publisher-mediated (gold) open access was popular in Latin American and African universities, whereas the growth of open access in Europe and North America has mostly been driven by repositories.

 

Meta-Research: Evaluating the impact of open access policies on research institutions – PubMed

Abstract:  The proportion of research outputs published in open access journals or made available on other freely-accessible platforms has increased over the past two decades, driven largely by funder mandates, institutional policies, grass-roots advocacy, and changing attitudes in the research community. However, the relative effectiveness of these different interventions has remained largely unexplored. Here we present a robust, transparent and updateable method for analysing how these interventions affect the open access performance of individual institutes. We studied 1,207 institutions from across the world, and found that, in 2017, the top-performing universities published around 80-90% of their research open access. The analysis also showed that publisher-mediated (gold) open access was popular in Latin American and African universities, whereas the growth of open access in Europe and North America has mostly been driven by repositories.

 

Responses to common misconceptions about campus open-access policies

“As a growing number of academic institutions gain experience in developing campus openaccess (OA) policies, common misconceptions have surfaced. This document responds to these misconceptions, offering a series of talking points developed to help respond effectively if they surface on your campus.1 Additional resources on developing and implementing a campus open-access policy, including expert consultation, are available from SPARC. See our page on campus policies at http://www.arl.org/sparc/advocacy/campus …”

A brief history of open access at Harvard · Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication

“This is the first of two related posts. The second will describe our current thinking about open access. (Watch for it around Open Access Week, 2020.) We’re looking forward and want to start by showing where we’ve come from. 

For now, this brief history focuses mostly on Harvard’s thinking about subscription journal prices and Harvard’s open access (OA) policies. There are many other OA initiatives at Harvard we might add later, for example on courseware, data, digitization, open-source software, and publishing, as well as our partnerships with larger, multi-institutional initiatives. …”