Open Access – Penn State’s Open Access Policy

“On April 23, 2019, the Penn State Faculty Senate voted to endorse the Open Access Policy Recommendations from the University’s Open Access Task Force and the Senate Committee on Libraries, Information Systems, and Technology. The policy, AC02, has been approved by the president of the university and went into effect on January 1, 2020….”

New open access policy expands public accessibility of Penn State research | Penn State University

“Penn State has joined a growing list of major research universities to enact an open access policy to expand the public availability and accessibility of its research.

The new open access policy took effect on Jan. 1 and applies to all University researchers, including faculty and staff, University appointees, graduate and post-doctoral research assistants or fellows, and visiting scholars.

 

Under the new policy — known officially as AC02 — University researchers automatically grant Penn State a non-exclusive license to make their work available through ScholarSphere, the University’s open access institutional repository designed to help increase the global visibility and impact of Penn State research and scholarship….”

Open Access Policy – Open Access – LibGuides at University of Lethbridge

“3.1. University Authors are encouraged to provide the University of Lethbridge Library an electronic copy of the finalized text of all scholarly articles. The electronic copy shall be provided to the University of Lethbridge Library (opus.library@uleth.ca) prior to the date of its publication.

3.2. University Authors grant the University of Lethbridge the non-exclusive permission to permanently archive, preserve, reproduce and openly disseminate, in any medium1, all scholarly articles authored by the University Author, provided that the articles are properly attributed to the University Authors; this permission is granted for the sole objective of archiving the articles for non-commercial purposes. Permission is granted on the understanding that University Authors will not be charged any use or service fees for activities associated with this Policy….”

January COAPI Community Call – Jan 22, 2020 – SPARC

“While maintaining an institutional repository (IR) is now an established university library service, both the origin stories and purposes of our repositories vary greatly. Is it time to re-evaluate the IR and its purpose?

 

Given the staff, time, and technical resources needed to support an IR, are we getting sufficient return on our investment? How do we even analyze our IRs to determine ROI? Do we need to redefine the purpose of our IRs? How will our IRs change over the next decade, whether or not we redefine the purpose? How will ETD and OA policies or the collections as data movement influence those changes?

 

Please join us on Wednesday, January 22nd, at 1:00 PM ET for a COAPI Community Call to investigate the big questions around our IRs. Setting the stage will be Ellen Dubinsky, Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Arizona, and Kathleen Shearer, Executive Director, Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR)….”

TU Delft Strategic Plan Open Science 2020-2024 | TU Delft Repositories

Abstract:  Open Science is creating new forms of scientific interaction that were impossible or undreamed of in an earlier age. This has a strong impact on core academic processes like research, education and innovation. It is, for instance, easier to replicate an experiment if the relevant data sets are digitally available to any scientist who wishes to corroborate her colleague’s findings.TU Delft has a long history of engagement with Open Science. Yet, with its Open Science Programme 2020-2024, Research and Education in the Open Era, TU Delft wishes to take Open Science to the next level: a situation in which Open Science has become the default way of practising research and education, and the “information era” has become the “open era”. It is TU Delft’s ambition to be frontrunner in this revolutionary process. This is reflected in the TU Delft Strategic Framework 2018-2024, with “openness” as one of its major principles.The TU Delft Open Science Programme 2020-2024 tackles all areas of scholarly engagement where restrictions limit the flow of academic knowledge. It proposes new approaches to the process of research, education and innovation, with a strong focus on transparency, integrity and efficiency.The programme consists of five interrelated projects: Open Education, Open Access, Open Publishing Platform, FAIR Data, and FAIR Software. The projects are aimed at creating and disseminating various types of resources for the benefit of TU Delft researchers, teachers and students, as well as the general public. They will range from educational materials and software to a publishing platform. All outputs of the programme will be as ‘FAIR’ as possible: findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable.

Open Science Programme 2020-2024

“On Tuesday 26 November, the Executive Board of TU Delft endorsed the Open Science Programme 2020 – 2024, ‘Research and Education in the Open Era’. Over the next four years, the university will further its efforts to make open research and education a standard part of scientific practice. Prof. dr. Rob Mudde, vice-rector magnificus of TU Delft: “It is our ambition to be the frontrunner in this area.  Our aim is that Open Science becomes the default setting for research and education at TU Delft.” …”

“Collaborating Across Campus to Advance Open Access Policy Compliance” by Andrew Johnson, Melissa Cantrell et al.

In 2018, the Data and Scholarly Communication Services Unit (DSCS) at the University of Colorado Boulder began implementing two open access (OA) policy workflows with the aim of increasing content in the institutional repository CU Scholar, expanding awareness of the campus OA policy that was passed in 2015, and decreasing the burden on researchers for participation in the policy. DSCS leveraged collaborative relationships with other library departments and campus units in order to mobilize the data, infrastructure, procedures, and documentation to execute these workflows. The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) workflow identifies existing open access publications by CU Boulder faculty and mediates deposit in order to make them available in CU Scholar. The liaison outreach workflow partners with liaison librarians to request from faculty preprints and author’s final manuscripts of publications in which the publisher version may have copyright restrictions. At present, the DOAJ workflow has resulted in 754 articles deposited in CU Scholar, and the liaison outreach workflow has resulted in 91 articles deposited. Each of these workflows pose challenges that have required flexibility, experimentation, and clear communication between stakeholders. This case study, which includes detailed descriptions of both open access policy workflows, initial results, and plans for future implementation, may serve as a guide for other institutions wishing to adopt and/or adapt institutional repository workflows and forge collaborative relationships to further open access initiatives in their local context.

Survey of Academic Library Leadership: Level of Support for Open Access Initiatives

“This 61-page report [$114 for one PDF copy] looks closely at academic library activity to support open access.  The study gives highly precise data on librarian perceptions of faculty support for open access, and for library activities in peer review, open access publishing and other ventures and activity to support open access, including the payment of author fees and development of institutional digital repositories.  The study helps its readers to answer questions such as:  What percentage of libraries are active in helping to develop peer review networks?  How much do libraries spend on author fees?  How many themselves publish open access journals? What percentage of faculty routinely deposit their scholarly articles in the institutional digital repository? How effective have librarians been in promoting the repository to faculty? How do librarians evaluate the current effectiveness of future probably impact of open access?  How do librarians view the level of support that they are getting from university management on open access issues? How many staff positions are largely devoted to various specified open access activities?

Just a few of the report’s many findings are that:

Public colleges were significantly more likely than private ones to report support from university or college administration for open access initiatives.
25% of respondents from research universities reported more than just modest progress over the past two years in convincing faculty to deposit their research articles into institutional digital repositories.
13.64% of the MA/PHD level colleges and universities in the sample published their own open access journals.
Nearly 24% of respondents from institutions with enrolment of greater than 10,000 FTE were active in developing peer review networks for open access publications.
Data in the report is broken out by size and type of institution, by tuition level, for public and private institutions and by other useful variables. 

Data in the report is broken out by size and type of institution, by tuition level, for public and private institutions and by other useful variables.”

Making full and immediate open access a reality: the role of the institutional OA policy | UKSCL

“Policy should incentivise. In the case of the UKSCL model institutional open access policy there are:

Incentives for the academic: the retention of academic freedom to publish in the venue of choice knowing that rights have legally been retained in order to meet funder open access aims
Incentives for the library and finance directors: reassurance that funder mandates are not accompanied by significant new financial burdens for the institution
And finally, incentives for publishers: to work with us so that an affordable transition can be achieved, and so that it is the Version of Record which is freely and publicly available on publication.

Finally, If I were to have one wish, it would be this: that, having done all this work to establish this legal approach to solving first, the OA policy stack, and now, the challenges for implementing cOAlition S aims, that the policy was not, in the end, needed, and that we were instead able to find an affordable and workable route to full and immediate open access….”