New NIH-funded translational research centers to speed, diversify Alzheimer’s drug discovery | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

“The Accelerating Medicines Partnership-Alzheimer’s Disease (AMP-AD) program’s open-science enterprise, which has provided more than 500 new candidate targets for Alzheimer’s disease, served as the foundation for the new centers.

“Through these centers, NIH will expand the use of open-science and open-source principles to de-risk novel drug targets with the goal of facilitating the development of new treatments for Alzheimer’s,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D….”

New NIH-funded translational research centers to speed, diversify Alzheimer’s drug discovery | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

“The Accelerating Medicines Partnership-Alzheimer’s Disease (AMP-AD) program’s open-science enterprise, which has provided more than 500 new candidate targets for Alzheimer’s disease, served as the foundation for the new centers.

“Through these centers, NIH will expand the use of open-science and open-source principles to de-risk novel drug targets with the goal of facilitating the development of new treatments for Alzheimer’s,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D….”

REF should accommodate more diverse outputs, says study | Times Higher Education (THE)

“The UK’s research excellence framework should evolve to support the growing diversity of scholarly outputs, a major report says.

The study by consultants Rand Europe, who were commissioned by Research England to consider how research assessment might need to evolve over the next decade, draws on a survey of 3,768 academics in England.

 

It says that, while scholars currently produce an average of 4.7 different types of research output, this is likely to increase to 6.5 over the next decade, with 65 per cent of respondents saying that they expected to produce a greater diversity of output.

Respondents said that the three most dominant forms of output were likely to remain journal articles, conference contributions and book chapters. But many mentioned other types of content that they expected to produce more of in future: for example, website content, openly published peer reviews and research reports for external bodies….”

REF should accommodate more diverse outputs, says study | Times Higher Education (THE)

“The UK’s research excellence framework should evolve to support the growing diversity of scholarly outputs, a major report says.

The study by consultants Rand Europe, who were commissioned by Research England to consider how research assessment might need to evolve over the next decade, draws on a survey of 3,768 academics in England.

 

It says that, while scholars currently produce an average of 4.7 different types of research output, this is likely to increase to 6.5 over the next decade, with 65 per cent of respondents saying that they expected to produce a greater diversity of output.

Respondents said that the three most dominant forms of output were likely to remain journal articles, conference contributions and book chapters. But many mentioned other types of content that they expected to produce more of in future: for example, website content, openly published peer reviews and research reports for external bodies….”

Ethiopia adopts a national open access policy | EIFL

“The new national open access policy adopted by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education of Ethiopia (MOSHE) will transform research and education in our country. The policy comes into effect immediately. It mandates open access to all published articles, theses, dissertations and data resulting from publicly-funded research conducted by staff and students at universities that are run by the Ministry – that is over 47 universities located across Ethiopia.

In addition to mandating open access to publications and data, the new policy encourages open science practices by including ‘openness’ as one of the criteria for assessment and evaluation of research proposals. All researchers who receive public funding must submit their Data Management Plans to research offices and to university libraries for approval, to confirm that data will be handled according to international FAIR data principles. (FAIR data are data that meet standards of Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusabililty.)…”

Ethiopia adopts a national open access policy | EIFL

“The new national open access policy adopted by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education of Ethiopia (MOSHE) will transform research and education in our country. The policy comes into effect immediately. It mandates open access to all published articles, theses, dissertations and data resulting from publicly-funded research conducted by staff and students at universities that are run by the Ministry – that is over 47 universities located across Ethiopia.

In addition to mandating open access to publications and data, the new policy encourages open science practices by including ‘openness’ as one of the criteria for assessment and evaluation of research proposals. All researchers who receive public funding must submit their Data Management Plans to research offices and to university libraries for approval, to confirm that data will be handled according to international FAIR data principles. (FAIR data are data that meet standards of Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusabililty.)…”

A Human-Centric Digital Manifesto for Europe – Open Society Foundations

“Public money should be invested towards societal benefit wherever possible. In the case of research, making scientific and academic works freely available is of clear benefit for universities and public institutions. The former benefit from greater visibility for their work and their staff, as the outcome of their work can be improved and reused by similar institutions or by individual experts. The latter benefit from access to the work in which they have directly or indirectly invested.

At the same time, by requiring the use of open standards, open source code, open hardware and open data, the EU will be investing in improving its security, avoiding vendor lock-in, ensuring transparency as well as control of technologies, and allowing for cross-border collaboration within EU Member States’ institutions and with non-EU partners. This will strengthen innovation and better ensure the achievement of broader policy goals on data protection, privacy and security….”

Horizon 2020 and UK Research and Innovation Requirements for H2020 Projects | Jisc scholarly communications

“Twice a year, Jisc contacts Horizon2020-funded projects in the UK on behalf of OpenAIRE (www.openaire.eu) which supports the EC’s Open Access policies.  Jisc is the National Open Access Desk for OpenAIRE in the UK, and we contact project coordinators because there are particular Open Access obligations within most of the Horizon2020 projects for the EC:

Open Access Mandate:  All H2020 projects must provide open access (OA) to all peer-reviewed scientific publications that stem from project activities, immediately or otherwise within 6/12 months of publication where publisher embargoes apply.  Non-compliance can lead to a grant reduction and potential sanctions.
Open Research Data Pilot: Projects in designated areas of H2020 will participate in a pilot project to make the underlying data related to project outputs openly available and accessible for use by other researchers, innovative industries and citizens.  If you have signed up to the pilot, you will need to make your research data openly available, as well.

How many OA publications does your project have? Take a look at your project page at: https://explore.openaire.eu/search/find/projects. You can use this page to help you with reporting!…”

HEAL Public Access and Data Sharing Policy | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

“In response to the public health emergency of opioid misuse, addiction and overdose, NIH has launched the HEAL (Helping to End Addiction Long-termSM) Initiative. The NIH HEAL InitiativeSM is a trans-agency effort focused on improving prevention and treatment strategies for opioid misuse and addiction and enhancing pain management. As part of its response to this crisis, NIH intends to maximize the availability of Publications and the sharing of underlying data for NIH-Supported HEAL research projects. Given the urgency of this crisis as highlighted by the declared public health emergency, rapid availability of Publications and the primary data behind them promotes dissemination of new knowledge, enhances reproducibility, and accelerates the ability of researchers to build upon HEAL research to make new discoveries.

Through the HEAL Initiative Public Access and Data Sharing Policy (the “Policy”), NIH seeks to create an infrastructure that addresses the need for researchers, clinicians, and patients to collaborate on sharing their collective data and knowledge about opioid misuse and pain to provide scientific solutions to the opioid crisis. Under the Policy, applicants for extramural research funding (grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, and other transactions) (collectively, “Applicants”), for HEAL research projects are required to submit a Public Access and Data Sharing Plan that (1) describes their proposed process for making resulting Publications and to the extent possible, the underlying Primary Data immediately and broadly available to the public; or (2) if applicable, provides a justification to NIH if such sharing is not possible. Underlying Primary Data should be made as widely and freely available as possible while safeguarding the privacy of participants, and protecting confidential and proprietary data….”

Science Foundation Ireland’s 2018 Annual Report highlights 43% increase in research funding from industry to €46 million – Irish Tech News

“At the end of 2018, 45% of SFI-funded original and review articles were open access, bringing us closer to our goal of achieving full and immediate open access for all SFI-funded research publications by 2021. This increased access allows the societal and economic benefits of our funded research to go further. As we build on this continued growth and look to 2019 and beyond, Science Foundation Ireland’s new strategy for 2020-2025will aim to empower our research community, focusing on the areas where we can bring the most value.”