UK research funders target hybrid open access charges | Times Higher Education (THE)

“Wellcome Trust and UK Research & Innovation launch reviews of policies that require funded papers to be made freely available…

[T]he Wellcome Trust highlighted that 71 per cent of its £5.7 million outlay on article processing charges in 2015-16 had been spent with hybrid open access journals. These are subscription periodicals that allow papers to be made freely available in return for the processing fee.

Significantly, average article processing charges for hybrid open access titles stood at £2,209 that year, 34 per cent higher than the average for a fully open access paper (£1,644).

Robert Kiley, head of open research at Wellcome, said that part of the rationale for the review came from “increasing costs”, particularly from hybrid journals.

Compliance with Wellcome’s open access policy now stands at more than 75 per cent, and it is thought that addressing cost issues would push this even higher….

A recent Universities UK report found that higher education institutions’ journal subscription costs had increased by 20 per cent in three years despite the shift to open access, with the dual income streams of hybrid journals a major concern….”

We need to fix tech transfer at universities | University Affairs

“Why should universities continue to own and profit from publicly-funded work? If the public pays for it, why shouldn’t the public own it? … However, unlike governmental funding, the funds given by a private company to an academic researcher also come with an expectation of ownership. The trouble arises when the university is unwilling to fund the work but is also unwilling to cede ownership of the resulting invention. (As an aside, this is not unlike the longstanding debate on open access to scientific papers)….I can understand the institution retaining some claim on the IP alongside the public because they are providing the infrastructure to enable this work, which is effectively considered an extension of this work by their faculty. But when the university pulls back research funding entirely and expects financial support of “its own” scientists to come entirely from public grants or private contracts, and then “double dips” – detracting from these grants’ operating expenses to support the indirect costs of maintaining the research lab, then ownership of the resulting IP should pass to the funding parties….”

In Conversation with the Wellcome Trust – sharing & managing research outputs | Unlocking Research

“In July 2017, the Wellcome Trust updated their policy on the management and sharing of research outputs.  This policy helps deliver Wellcome’s mission – to improve health for everyone by enabling great ideas to thrive.  The University of Cambridge’s Research Data Management Facility invited Wellcome Trust to Cambridge to talk with their funded research community (and potential researchers) about what this updated policy means for them.  On 5th December in the Gurdon Institute Tea Room, the Deputy Head of Scholarly Communication Dr Lauren Cadwallader, welcomed Robert Kiley, Head of Open Research, and David Carr, Open Research Programme Manager, from the Wellcome’s Open Research Team. 

This blog summarises the presentations from David and Robert about the research outputs policy and how it has been working and the questions raised by the audience….”

Shire Continues to Uphold High Standards of Ethics and Transparency with Adoption of Open Access Policy for Publication of Shire-Supported Research

“Shire plc (LSE: SHP, NASDAQ: SHPG), the global leader in rare diseases, has implemented a new publication policy requiring the submission of all Shire-supported research manuscripts to journals that offer public availability via open access, allowing the public to obtain free, unrestricted online access to Shire’s research promptly following publication. Shire’s open access policy, which went into effect on January 2, 2018, was announced today at the 2018 European Meeting of International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) taking place in London, UK, January 23-24….”

Shire adopts open-access policy for publication of future research

“Shire has announced the introduction of a new open-access publication policy that will apply to all future Shire-supported research. In future, all manuscripts pertaining to Shire-affiliated research will be submitted to journals that offer public availability via open access, meaning the public will be able to obtain free, unrestricted and prompt online access to Shire’s research….”

Queen announces launch of Edraak’s free online platform for school learners in Davos | Jordan Times

“Her Majesty Queen Rania on Wednesday announced the launch of a new learning platform catering to school-aged children across the Arab world, according to a statement from Her Majesty’s Office. …”

CTF Partners with Digital Science to Promote Open Data | Children’s Tumor Foundation

“The Children’s Tumor Foundation’s commitment to collaboration, open data and transparency is reinforced with a partnership with global technology company Digital Science on a new platform for next-generation research and discovery called Dimensions. This groundbreaking research information database aims to transform scholarly search by linking publications, grants, policy, data, and metrics for the first time.”

Research Funders and Expanded Access: A How?To Resource for Health Research Alliance Members, Developed by SPARC and HRA (July 2014)

“SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, and the Health Research Alliance (HRA) partnered to produce this guide for HRA member organizations wishing to implement public access policies….”

Open Science: The Next Frontier for Neurology

“What are One Mind’s open science principles?

To support Open Science for brain disease and injury, One Mind urges the international research community to adopt the following principles:

Provide informed consents for collection of medical data obtained from patients, which should permit use of their de-identified (anonymous) data for research related to a broad range of conditions — consistent with protecting patient privacy.

Use widely accepted common data elements and conform to the highest possible standards when clinical data is collected. This enables it to be used by the widest possible array of users, whether academic, medical, clinical or commercial.

Make data available to the research community as soon as possible after study completion, with the goal of opening data access within six months whenever possible.

Make data accessible to external researchers during the course of a study (subject to relevant data use agreements).

Give data generators proper attribution & credit from those who use their data.

Do not delay the publication of findings, as it may affect patient care.

Intellectual property should not stand in the way of research, but be used to incentivize material participation….”