Gates Foundation Joins Wellcome Trust in Calling for Open Sharing of Research and Data Related to DRC Ebola Outbreak

“The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation strongly supports the Wellcome Trust’s call for the open sharing of all research findings and data relevant to the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We agree that it is imperative that research and data should be shared rapidly and openly during this and all future public health emergencies….”

New fund to support groundbreaking open research – Wellcome

New Open Research Fund supports innovative approaches that enable data, code or other research outputs to be discovered, accessed and reused.

It will allow researchers from any discipline to do experiments at the cutting edge of open research and evaluate the benefits and risks of their approach.

The awards are:

  • for new activities or to develop existing activities
  • open to individuals or teams from anywhere in the world
  • up to £50,000 each.

Wellcome will be accepting applications once a year.

Robert Kiley, Head of Wellcome’s Open Research team, says: “We believe the research community are best placed to devise new and innovative ways to make research outputs more open and usable.

“These awards provide a unique opportunity for the most interesting and groundbreaking proposals to be developed, tested and evaluated.”

[Wellcome Trust consultation on revising its OA policy]

“Wellcome is conducting a review of its open access (OA) policy. The aim of this review is to ensure that knowledge and discoveries which arise from publications stemming from our funding are shared and used to maximise their benefit to health. This open consultation forms part of the review process and responses will be used by our internal working group to inform the outcome….”

Open Science Policy Statements for AHA Funded Research

” ‘Outbound’ Public Access

The American Heart Association (AHA) requires that all journal articles resulting from AHA funding (“outbound” research) be made freely available in PubMed Central (PMC) within 12 months of publication. It is the responsibility of the awardee to ensure journal articles are deposited into PMC….

‘Inbound’ Public Access

All original research articles in the 11 subscription-model AHA journals (“inbound” research) are made freely available on each respective journal website 6 months after publication. All non-original research articles are made freely available on each respective journal web site 12 months after publication. Scientific statements and clinical practice guidelines are made freely available immediately on publication.

The Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA) is the AHA open access journal. Because it utilizes an author pays model, the author pays for publication costs and retains copyright. The AHA is granted a nonexclusive license of all rights of copyright in and to the article. JAHA articles are deposited in PMC on publication….”

Doris Duke Medical Research Program Guidelines and Policies

See the OA policy at pp. 7-8.

“The foundation requires that any publication based on a DDCF-funded research project must be made freely available and downloadable online in a timely manner and with as few restrictions as possible, in order to ensure that DDCF-funded research can be accessed, read and built upon. Starting with grants made in 2013, DDCF grantees and their institutions must agree to fulfill this requirement by depositing all documents accepted for publication resulting from their DDCF-funded research project into the National Institutes of Health’s PubMed Central (“PMC”) in accordance with the following stipulations:

? Documents are defined to include all authors’ final manuscripts accepted for publication, including all modifications from the publishing and peer review process (the “postprints”);

? Documents are to be deposited in PMC upon the grantee’s receipt of notification of acceptance for publication;

? Grantees may impose an embargo on PMC’s public release of the documents that ends no later than 12 months after the official date of publication. 8 Access to PMC is made available to the grantee through DDCF’s membership in the Health Research Alliance (HRA) (a national consortium of non-governmental, nonprofit funders of biomedical research and training) and DDCF’s registration of data about its clinical research grants in the HRA reporter database. DDCF will provide detailed instructions for depositing documents in PMC to grantees upon DDCF’s receipt of a fully executed grant agreement.” 

Wellcome ‘disappointed’ over fall in open-access compliance

“The Wellcome Trust has announced it will keep a vigilant eye on how Oxford University Press complies with open-access policies, after data showed that the publisher’s adherence fell significantly last year….

The data show that overall compliance with the fund’s policies has fallen from 91 per cent in 2016 to 87 per cent in 2017….

In particular, compliance by Oxford University Press fell “significantly”, according to the trust, because the publisher has been experiencing problems with converting outputs to a format that is compliant with Europe PubMed Central’s technical requirements.

Wellcome said it would monitor the situation over three to six months, to ensure that it was resolved, and seek compensation from the publisher “for the poor service delivered to researchers, institutions and funders over the last 12 months”, it said.

A total of 34 per cent of articles paid for by the Charity Open Access Fund in 2016-17 and published by Oxford University Press were non-compliant—compared with 5 per cent the previous year. The second and third-most non-compliant publishers were Elsevier at 11 per cent and Wiley at 10 per cent….

Overall, the trust calculates that the cost of open-access publishing has seen “a significant increase”, and that the average cost of journal article-processing charges has risen by 11 per cent since last year….”

Funder Perspectives on Open Infrastructure

“In March, 2019, the Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) issued an open call for participation in a survey to better understand funder perspectives with respect to supporting open infrastructure. Sixteen funders completed the questionnaire, evenly split between ORFG members and other funding organizations. The vast majority of respondents (four in five) have some form of open access position, nearly evenly split between policies and recommendations. Beyond open access, however, there is very little consensus on other open activities. Data sharing is the only other activity supported by more than half of the respondents (four data sharing policies and six data sharing recommendations). Publication of null results, protocol sharing, and code sharing are each in play at roughly a third of responding foundations.”

Funder Perspectives on Open Infrastructure — Open Research Funders Group

“The Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) recently conducted a survey to better understand funder perspectives with respect to supporting open infrastructure. Sixteen organizations completed the questionnaire, evenly split between ORFG members and other funding bodies.”