Academic Publication Rights Cause European Dispute : Stephen E. Arnold @ Beyond Search

“Being published is the bread and butter of intellectuals, especially academics. publication, in theory, is a way for information to be shared across the globe, but it also has become big business. In a recent Chemistry World article the standoff between Germany’s Project DEAL (a consortium comprised of German universities) and Dutch publisher, Elsevier, is examined along with possible fall-out from the end result.

At the heart of the dispute is who controls the publications. Currently, Elsevier holds the cards and has wielded their power to make a clear point on the matter. Project DEAL, though, is not going down without a fight and Chemistry World quotes Horst Hippler, a physical chemist and chief negotiator for Project DEAL, as saying,

In the course of digitisation, science communication is undergoing a fundamental transformation process. Comprehensive, free and – above all – sustainable access to scientific publications is of immense importance to our researchers. We therefore will actively pursue the transformation to open access, which is an important building block in the concept of open science. To this end, we want to create a fair and sustainable basis through appropriate licensing agreements with Elsevier and other scientific publishers.

As publications are moving farther from ink and paper and more to digital who owns the rights to the information is becoming murkier. It will be interesting to see how this battle plays out and if any more disgruntled academics jump on board.”

The Journal Publishing Market Between Supply- and Demand-Side Models: The Case of Open Access in Germany | Open Science

“Without significant support for Open Access journals, large-scale transitions to Open Access may be slow to come, as the German case indicates.

A Blog Article by Pablo Markin.”

Presseinformationen – Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren

From Google’s English: “16 centers of the Helmholtz Association have terminated their license agreements with the scientific publishing house Elsevier at the end of 2017. With this decision the Elsevier contracts of all Helmholtz centers expire, whose contracts end on 31.12.2017. This means that the largest German research organization has now joined the more than one hundred scientific institutions that have terminated or extended their license agreements with Elsevier in order to strengthen the negotiating position of the DEAL project. Since 2016 representatives of the DEAL project on behalf of the alliance of the German scientific organizations with the publishing house Elsevier negotiate a nationwide licensing of magazines. The negotiations are very difficult, which is why the exit is now a clear sign….The President of the Helmholtz Association, Professor Dr. Otmar D. Wiestler, explains: “The Helmholtz Association will not conclude its own license agreements with Elsevier. We promote the changeover of the publication system to Open Access and therefore support the objectives of the DEAL project.” The most important goals [of the DEAL project] are: [1] All scientific institutions involved in the DEAL contract have full-time access to the full range of e-journals from Elsevier. [2] All publications by authors from German institutions are automatically submitted to Open Access (CC-BY, including peer review). [3] Appropriate pricing according to a simple, future-oriented calculation model that is oriented to the volume of publications….Dr. Martin Köhler, DESY’s director of the library and former negotiator for the Helmholtz contracts with Elsevier has no reservations about the literature supply: “The experiences of the” dropouts “at the beginning of the year showed that a contractless situation can be solved without problems. The Helmholtz libraries are well positioned and expect to be able to reliably provide the scientists with the necessary articles, even during longer lasting negotiations.”

GMS | GMS Ophthalmology Cases – An Open Access Journal | GMS Ophthalmology Cases – An Open Access Journal

“Dear Reader,

presenting the first edition of “GMS Ophthalmology Cases – An Open Access Journal” (GMS OC) we take the opportunity to reflect on whether it is worthwhile to found yet another case report journal. As for GMS OCOA, it is the open access quality of publishing that is original and pertinent to case reporting. Compared to subscription journals case reports published via “open access” achieve a wider reach, because they are more likely to be located and because they are downloaded more frequently. In subscription journals case reports are usually difficult to publish. Most editors give citation impact priority. Nevertheless, the educational nature of case reports means an important reference library to clinicians and researchers alike. For that reason GMS OC is dedicated to case reports but refined by the feature of barrier-free access. The full text version is readable and downloadable free of charge, including images and even videos. The latter may be especially helpful to illustrate surgical interventions. There is no copyright transfer from the author to the publisher! Costs are an important barrier amongst authors and readers of case reports alike. We are in a situation to avoid publishing fees altogether, at least within the first year of opening. Thereafter a moderate fee will be claimed. The publisher, German Medical Science, exponent and part of the “German National Library of Medicine”, is a non-profit organization, dedicated to distribute research results of the medical science worldwide (see: http://www.egms.de/en/terms.htm). Highly secure servers of “German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI)”, guarantee a sustained access and referencing of papers and data. GMS OC will be screened by MEDLINE and will collect impact factor credits….”

Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts | The Scientist Magazine

“In Germany, the fight for open access and favorable pricing for journals is getting heated. At the end of last month (June 30), four major academic institutions in Berlin announced that they would not renew their subscriptions with the Dutch publishing giant Elsevier once they end this December. Then on July 7, nine universities in Baden-Württemberg, another large German state, also declared their intention to cancel their contracts with the publisher at the end of 2017.

These institutions join around 60 others across the country that allowed their contracts to expire last year.

The decision to cancel subscriptions was made in order to put pressure on Elsevier during ongoing negotiations. “Nobody wants Elsevier to starve—they should be paid fairly for their good service,” says Ursula Flitner, the head of the medical library at Charité–Berlin University of Medicine. “The problem is, we no longer see what their good service is.”

Charité–Berlin University of Medicine is joined by Humboldt University of Berlin, Free University of Berlin, and Technical University of Berlin in letting its Elsevier subscriptions lapse….”

Berlin Appeal for Open Science sent to decision-makers – Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB)

“Although Open Science is an issue currently being discussed by policy-makers in Germany and at EU level, there is a lack of drive to implement it in practice. In the context of the Open Science Fellows Program initiated by Wikimedia Deutschland and the Stifterverband in 2016, young academics have joined forces and, working in accordance with the principles of Open Science, have drawn up five points that need to be implemented in policy and research in order to make full use of the advantages it offers: the Berlin Appeal for Open Science. They call for the basic conditions for Open Science to be further improved in a bid to promote the cultural transition towards more openness in science. Only then can the possibilities offered by Open Science be fully exploited, enabling us to advance as a knowledge society.”

What drives the relevance and reputation of economics journals? An update from a survey among economists | SpringerLink

Abstract:  This paper analyses the interrelationship between perceived journal reputation and its relevance for academics’ work. Based on a survey of 705 members of the German Economic Association (GEA), we find a strong interrelationship between perceived journal reputation and relevance where a journal’s perceived relevance has a stronger effect on its reputation than vice versa. Moreover, past journal ratings conducted by the Handelsblatt and the GEA directly affect journals’ reputation among German economists and indirectly also their perceived relevance, but the effect on reputation is more than twice as large as the effect on perceived relevance. In general, citations have a non-linear impact on perceived journal reputation and relevance. While the number of landmark articles published in a journal (as measured by the so-called H-index) increases the journal’s reputation, an increase in the H-index even tends to decrease a journal’s perceived relevance, as long as this is not simultaneously reflected in a higher Handelsblatt and/or GEA rating. This suggests that a journal’s relevance is driven by average article quality, while reputation depends more on truly exceptional articles. We also identify significant differences in the views on journal relevance and reputation between different age groups.

Impact of Social Sciences – Empirical analysis reveals significant discrepancy between journal reputation and perceived relevance in economics.

“Using survey data on the evaluations of 150 economics journals, a recent study explored the relationship between economics journals’ reputation and perceived relevance amongst economists working in the field. Justus Haucap shares some of the headline findings from the analysis based on the survey data. The findings suggest that a journal’s relevance is driven by average article quality, while reputation depends more on truly exceptional articles….”

Charité, FU, HU und TU kündigen ihre Elsevier-Verträge

From Google’s English: “Ladies and gentlemen, ladies and gentlemen, Since 2016, under the auspices of the President of the University Rectors’ Conference (HRK), Prof. Dr. Horst Hippler, with Elsevier over a nationwide License to use the publisher’s magazines. Objective of the negotiations Of the DEAL project, the magazine portfolios of the publishers Elsevier, Springer / Nature and Wiley from a subscription-based licensing to a publication-based financing To be transferred. A fair price model for the provision of the open- Access-based journals and counteracted the previous price spiral become. Regrettably, Elsevier has so far shown little negotiation. Therefore, have Numerous scientific institutions and universities signed their contracts with Elsevier Terminated or not extended, to the DEAL negotiations the necessary emphasis to lend. More than 70 scientific institutions have grown into this step in 2016 determined. In the coming weeks, more than 100 more Research institutes and universities….”