Project Manager for the European OpenAIRE-Advance project (E 14 TV-L)

“Responsibilities are as follows:

Manage the communication and dissemination work package, working closely with all areas and coordinators of the project

Contribute to strategic planning of the network, manage networking tasks and establish coordination activities, ensuring successful support for the implementation of open science policies

Oversight of topical scholarly communication task groups to increase capacity and knowledge among the network, including training and advocacy programmes

Help to develop and implement the OpenAIRE legal entity and open science partnerships, including oversight of liaison with the European Open Science Cloud

Coordination and communication of scholarly communication tasks, including developing technical interoperability guidelines for repositories and publishing platforms and OA monitoring through the Institutional Dashboard”

Vernehmlassungsantwort zum Entwurf des Urheberrechtsgesetzes – Parldigi – Digitale Nachhaltigkeit

From Google’s English: “The Parliamentary Group on Digital Sustainability (Parldigi) is committed to the sustainable and innovative use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and calls for unrestricted public access to knowledge….The open access strategies of the universities serve not only to science, but also to the general public, and enable access and the long-term preservation of knowledge. However, Open Access can only be implemented in a targeted manner if (scientific) works can actually be published freely accessible. The Swiss Code of Obligations (OR) provides that the rights of the copyright holder are only transferred to the publisher for as long as it is necessary for the execution of the publishing contract (Article 381 para 1 OR). However, this provision may be amended by contract. As a rule, the publishers make use of this possibility by transferring copyrights in standard contracts or general terms and conditions (GTC) in full. In order to prevent this in the future and thus ensure that scientific publications can be made freely accessible to the interested public, a new, compelling provision is to be introduced in the framework of the revision of the URG. Concretely, we propose to supplement Art. 381 OR with the following paragraph:

Art. 381 para. 2 OR (new): 

The right to make a publicly funded contribution for a scientific journal or a scientific collection free of charge may be made available to the publisher. …”

Home – OERinfo – Information Center OER

“The OER (OERinfo) information center is a themed-specific online portal that provides comprehensive information on OER for the general public and professional target groups. The aim is the broad visualization of OER and the addressing of new target groups. The current state of knowledge is to be prepared for the practice, information on best practice examples bundled and the variety of existing initiatives are illustrated….”

Knowledge Unlatched to open up its central platform for the funding of Open Access models – Knowledge Unlatched

“Berlin, 5th October 2017 Knowledge Unlatched (KU) is pleased to announce its transformation into a central Open Access (OA) platform. Through this platform, KU will support publishers and OA initiatives by managing the funding processes for their OA models. It will also provide libraries and funders all over the world with one central place where they can support OA programmes. Knowledge Unlatched’s core product, KU Select, will remain an important part of the platform, and will be including STEM alongside HSS titles in 2018.”

G7 Science Ministers’ Communiqué, September 28, 2017

“16. We affirm the principle that efforts should be directed to promote a widespread participation of researchers in the network of global research infrastructures, taking account of the opportunities offered by open science paradigms. Significant contributions to this discussion come from the “Group of Senior Officials on Global Research Infrastructures” (GSO) and the G7 “Open Science Working Group” (OS WG)….[18] We welcome the GSO’s 2017 report that includes both the evolution of the Framework corresponding to a broader and deeper consensus on global access criteria, the developments on open innovation and open data policies….19. We recognize that ICT developments, the digitisation and the vast availability of data, efforts to push the science frontiers, and the need to address complex economic and societal challenges, are transforming the way in which science is performed towards Open Science paradigms. We agree that an international approach can help the speed and coherence of this transition, and that it should target in particular two aspects. First, the incentives for the openness of the research ecosystem: the evaluation of research careers should better recognize and reward Open Science activities. Secondly, the infrastructures for an optimal use of research data: all researchers should be able to deposit, access and analyse scientific data across disciplines and at the global scale, and research data should adhere to the FAIR principles of being findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable….20. We support the work and results achieved so far by the G7 Open Science Working group. The OS Working Group has identified priorities that deserve and require common aligned actions, both in encouraging openness and data skills in scientific research practice, through workforce development and training. We encourage the OS WG to follow-up actions taken by G7 members according to the WG’s recommendations and to collect good practices, in order to report to the next G7 Science Minister’s Meeting. In particular, we support the OS WG deepening its efforts on the two topics identified above (paragraph 19), namely the incentives for openness of the research ecosystem, including the role of research indicators and metrics relevant to open science, and the infrastructures and standards for optimal use of research. The summary report of the OS working group is attached to this Communiqué….”

Libraries, Universities Unite to Push for Open Access – ECS

Over the summer, librarians and academic leaders in Germany came together to lead a push in taking down the paywalls that block access to so many scientific research articles. The initiative, named Projekt DEAL, represents a bold push toward open access that could change the landscape of academic publishing.

The latest developments in Projekt DEAL pick up on a battle now over two years in the making, where libraries and universities in Germany have united in pushing large publishers to adopt a new business model. The institutions are looking to forego the typical subscription-based academic publishing business model in lieu of paying an annual lump sum that covers publications costs of all papers whose first authors are associated with German institutions.”

Open Access in Konstanz | Friedrichshafen | SWR Aktuell | SWR.de

from Google tranlate: “The Administrative Court in Mannheim is concerned on Tuesday with a complaint by professors of the University of Konstanz. The question is whether and when research should be made available free of charge.”

Academic Publication Rights Cause European Dispute : Stephen E. Arnold @ Beyond Search

“Being published is the bread and butter of intellectuals, especially academics. publication, in theory, is a way for information to be shared across the globe, but it also has become big business. In a recent Chemistry World article the standoff between Germany’s Project DEAL (a consortium comprised of German universities) and Dutch publisher, Elsevier, is examined along with possible fall-out from the end result.

At the heart of the dispute is who controls the publications. Currently, Elsevier holds the cards and has wielded their power to make a clear point on the matter. Project DEAL, though, is not going down without a fight and Chemistry World quotes Horst Hippler, a physical chemist and chief negotiator for Project DEAL, as saying,

In the course of digitisation, science communication is undergoing a fundamental transformation process. Comprehensive, free and – above all – sustainable access to scientific publications is of immense importance to our researchers. We therefore will actively pursue the transformation to open access, which is an important building block in the concept of open science. To this end, we want to create a fair and sustainable basis through appropriate licensing agreements with Elsevier and other scientific publishers.

As publications are moving farther from ink and paper and more to digital who owns the rights to the information is becoming murkier. It will be interesting to see how this battle plays out and if any more disgruntled academics jump on board.”

The Journal Publishing Market Between Supply- and Demand-Side Models: The Case of Open Access in Germany | Open Science

“Without significant support for Open Access journals, large-scale transitions to Open Access may be slow to come, as the German case indicates.

A Blog Article by Pablo Markin.”

Presseinformationen – Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren

From Google’s English: “16 centers of the Helmholtz Association have terminated their license agreements with the scientific publishing house Elsevier at the end of 2017. With this decision the Elsevier contracts of all Helmholtz centers expire, whose contracts end on 31.12.2017. This means that the largest German research organization has now joined the more than one hundred scientific institutions that have terminated or extended their license agreements with Elsevier in order to strengthen the negotiating position of the DEAL project. Since 2016 representatives of the DEAL project on behalf of the alliance of the German scientific organizations with the publishing house Elsevier negotiate a nationwide licensing of magazines. The negotiations are very difficult, which is why the exit is now a clear sign….The President of the Helmholtz Association, Professor Dr. Otmar D. Wiestler, explains: “The Helmholtz Association will not conclude its own license agreements with Elsevier. We promote the changeover of the publication system to Open Access and therefore support the objectives of the DEAL project.” The most important goals [of the DEAL project] are: [1] All scientific institutions involved in the DEAL contract have full-time access to the full range of e-journals from Elsevier. [2] All publications by authors from German institutions are automatically submitted to Open Access (CC-BY, including peer review). [3] Appropriate pricing according to a simple, future-oriented calculation model that is oriented to the volume of publications….Dr. Martin Köhler, DESY’s director of the library and former negotiator for the Helmholtz contracts with Elsevier has no reservations about the literature supply: “The experiences of the” dropouts “at the beginning of the year showed that a contractless situation can be solved without problems. The Helmholtz libraries are well positioned and expect to be able to reliably provide the scientists with the necessary articles, even during longer lasting negotiations.”