Development sneak preview – Editoria

Editoria’s web-based word processor is being upgraded, along with the rest of the system, in response to the community’s most recent roadmap. In the current version of Editoria, Monemvasia, we have contextually sensitive styles. This means that once a component is recognized as a frontmatter item, for example, the ‘menu’ of style options available automatically updates to display only the styles relevant within the context of a front matter component. The same is true for parts, unnumbered components and chapters.

To take styling in the web-based word processor (via the Wax editor) to the next level, Christos Kokosias, Wax lead developer, is working up functionality (suggested by friends at punctum books) that adds the ability to customize tags at the chapter level. This will help with pagination as it improves the quality of the HTML available to export tools using CSS to automatically typeset content prepared in the browser….”

Who is Coko? An interview with Coko Co-founder and visionary Adam Hyde : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

The Scholarly Communications sector can learn a lot from open source and open processes. For example, at Coko we don’t actually own anything. It is the community that owns it. We facilitate the communities success and their success is our success. We share everything we have with them – code, methods, processes, PR, expertise, funding, successes, coffee! – and they in turn share those things with us. We are the community, the community is us. That can only happen in an environment of trust and trust is what openness – the core ingredient to best practice open source – is all about. If more people within the Scholarly Communications sector at large can learn to work like this then they will benefit from it greatly….”

Detroit Management Summit : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

It’s the beginning of a new chapter in the Coko story, and we are writing it together in Detroit, Michigan ahead of the Association of University Presses meeting, which we will attend and present at. We, of course, are Coko’s new management team, Adam, Jure and I. Together, we are discussing the structure of the organization and our offerings moving forward….

We are streamlining Coko. In the spirit of our signature transparency, we are sharing these early ideas with you. Moving forward, we will align Workflow Sprints and all Coko’s current activities such as developer workshops, open source consultancy and events around PubSweet. Editoria will continue to be a community-led project participating in the PubSweet Community, along with Hindawi’s Phenom, eLife’s Libero, micropublications.org and other platforms developed or developing with PubSweet. Wax, XSweet and Paged.js will be part of Cabbage Tree Labs (stay tuned for more on this soon)….”

What is Open?

Open Source for Open Scholarship began when a community of people gathered to discuss how open projects might better support each other. Adam Hyde, co-founder of the Collaborative Open Knowledge Foundation (Coko), convened a group of people working on open tools for science and research and facilitated a one day meeting. This turned into regular calls, the development of a supportive network, and lead to the 2018 meeting that produced this handbook.  Face to face meetings and regular calls allow a community to develop a common vocabulary. Community vocabularies may be unclear to folks who were not in the room or on the call when terms were discussed.  This post will define the terms we use to frame our work. Our hope is that this will both give context to the posts in this series and make it easy for newcomers to jump in to open source and scholarship community discussions….”

Much to say about editors! – Editoria

Editoria afficinados will know that the web based word processor that makes our color-coded track changes (and many others) dreams come true is actually a PubSweet component called Wax. And PubSweet pros will know that the component is based on the Substance editor libraries. Still, there are many more layers, both inside Coko technology, and out.

Open source collaborative editors are a very specialized domain. Recently, Coko’s lead PubSweet Developer Jure Triglav wrote a very detailed landscape view of all of the different editor options available in this space.

Also, Coko is working on creating a version of Wax that built against the ProseMirror library, and will be integrated in to Editoria in future. Christos Kokosias is the Lead Wax Developer and specializes in this area. Recently, Coko Co-founder Adam Hyde sat down with Christos to talk about editors. You can listen in!…”

PubSweet Collaboration Week – May 7 – 13 : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

About three years ago, we set out to build a framework for building publishing software with components. Take a component here, a component there, make one on your own, and, presto! you have your custom publishing platform! While the framework itself has matured significantly, we’re not there yet in terms of the available components and how they fit together.

At the same time, we started building a community around this framework, organisations and people looking to innovate within this space and looking for a way to do so. While building a community has to happen in parallel with software development, I think that if you’re doing open source development right, your community will be ahead of the software most of the time. This is certainly the case for us. We envisioned a community that openly shares their experiences and solutions and is willing to collaborate on new ideas, despite basically being competitors, and I can happily (and proudly) say that our community has already reached this ideal.

To close the loop and make PubSweet the go-to framework and component library for developing publishing software, we need to take the lessons from the three systems in production right now (Hindawi’s, EBI’s and eLife’s publishing systems) and incorporate them into PubSweet itself, for everyone to use and benefit from. If we could just get the designers and developers of these systems in the same room, get them to talk to each other, share their custom approaches and try to find commonalities between them… wouldn’t that be awesome? Luckily our community is awesome, and well-versed in that sort of thing, and that’s exactly what’s happening in our event this week!

For the inaugural PubSweet Collaboration Week, starting on May 7th, Coko, EBI, eLife and Hindawi are getting together in Cambridge to make more parts of these systems reusable and add them to PubSweet’s component library….”

We invite you to join us in Monemvasia! – Editoria

We are ridiculously excited to announce that the next version of Editoria is here! It has everything: 18 community-proposed new features, as well as a complete rebuild of the application against the new PubSweet, upgrade of Wax, enhanced xSweet and extended Paged.js! It’s more functionally elegant, more beautiful, more stable, and faster than its predecessor version….”

We invite you to join us in Monemvasia! – Editoria

We are ridiculously excited to announce that the next version of Editoria is here! It has everything: 18 community-proposed new features, as well as a complete rebuild of the application against the new PubSweet, upgrade of Wax, enhanced xSweet and extended Paged.js! It’s more functionally elegant, more beautiful, more stable, and faster than its predecessor version….”

Increase transparency by adding CRediT to workflow with PubSweet : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

In the PubSweet Community we are about contribution and reuse. Meanwhile, the CRediT taxonomy is all about transparently recognizing contributions to research. As such, we are pleased to announce that CRediT is implemented within CalTech’s Wormbase Micropublications platform, which is developed using PubSweet. This means that all other organizations within the community who are also building PubSweet platforms can leverage this modular component in their workflow. This is what we mean when we say that contributed components enrich the offering (and can speed development time) for all organizations joining and developing platforms subsequently….”