New Editoria Release – Oia : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“Oia is the name of the latest Editoria release out today. Oia is part of the municipality of Santorini, Greece. Alex Georgantas, Coko Dev and lead Editoria developer has been hard at work over the last months and we are proud to announce the release of Editoria Oia!

There have been many new features, and some fixes, added to Editoria in this release, however the main item is the new Asset manager. The Asset Manager takes Editoria along a lot of new paths which pushes the tool further into a league of its own wen it comes to professional book creation tools….”

Co-designing OA Publishing Infrastructures in Africa Workshop : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“We are very happy to announce the first in a series of four workshops on Co-Designing Open Access Infrastructures. These meetings are particularly focused on Africa and organized by the West and Central African Research and Education Network (WACREN), EIFL and Coko….”

Open Publishing Fest

“A festival, not a conference. Takes place over two weeks in May (May 18-29). We take the idea (but not literally) of “tents” as venues within a festival. There are many tents and each is curated around a certain theme. These tents have rolling events, sometimes gaps, sometimes gapless. Many events occur across all tents simultaneously. The tents relate to themes — Open Content, Open Source Software, and Open Publishing Models. There may also be a “main stage”.

All events are curated by thematic teams of people we trust. Each event is online. The festival website maintains the program of events. The central website is going to be very much like a festival programme, pointing to various events on each day you may wish to browse….”

Coko announces one-year contract with NCBI : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“Coko has received a one-year contract from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), a center within the US National Library of Medicine, to build a content management system to support its Bookshelf resource.

Bookshelf, which provides free online access to books and documents in the life sciences and in healthcare, is in need of a new content management system because its existing CMS is built on Microsoft Silverlight, which will no longer be supported by Microsoft after October 2021. For this reason, NCBI reached out to Coko for some help conceptualizing and building a new, open source content management system to support Bookshelf….”

GeoScienceWorld’s Lithosphere to run on Phenom | Hindawi

“Hindawi’s open source scholarly infrastructure platform, Phenom, recently received a huge vote of confidence, as it will now power the newly relaunched Lithosphere – the society-run, open access community journal for geosciences. The contract between GeoScienceWorld (GSW) and Hindawi was signed in late 2019 with Lithosphere opening for submissions on January 13th 2020….

Phenom combines Hindawi’s new modular publishing system developed using Coko’s PubSweet open source framework with services that draw from Hindawi’s experience in open access publishing to support partners, authors, editors, reviewers and readers. From manuscript submission to publication, Phenom currently underpins over 50 of Hindawi’s journals, with the rest of its journal portfolio to migrate through February 2020. Journals from Wiley and AAAS will also join Lithosphere in running on Phenom in 2020. …”

Collaborate on Open Access Publishing Infrastructure in Africa with Coko, WACREN and EIFL : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“If you want to work collaboratively to design free and open source open access publishing infrastructure in Africa, please get out your diary! On Tuesday, March 17 in Cotonou (Benin), please plan to join Coko Founder Adam Hyde, WACREN’s Omo Oaiya, and Iryna Kuchma from EIFL for a workshop on the subject. Registration is open to all (publishers, researchers, technologists), and free. At the same time, if travel cost is a burden, some limited funding is available, so please reach out.

Attendees can expect to participate in the following:

To conduct a high-level audit of needs for open access scholarly publishing in Africa (open source tools and services for publishing books, journals, textbooks, micropublications)
To discuss training needs and define training and support programmes
To share experiences and identify areas for collaborations around shared free and open source open access publishing infrastructure
To frame the Coalition for Open Access Publishing Infrastructures in Africa: tools, training, hosting and advice across Africa for all those that want it…”

The Case for an Institutionally Owned Knowledge Infrastructure

“Academic journals, the dominant dissemination platforms of scientific knowledge, have not been able to take advantage of the linking, transparency, dynamic communication and decentralized authority and review that the internet enables. Many other knowledge-driven sectors, from journalism to law, suffer from a similar bottleneck — caused not by a lack of technological capacity, but rather by an inability to design and implement efficient, open and trustworthy mechanisms of information dissemination.

Fortunately, growing dissatisfaction with current knowledge-sharing infrastructures has led to a more nuanced understanding of the requisite features that such platforms must provide. With such an understanding, higher education institutions around the world can begin to recapture the control and increase the utility of the knowledge they produce….

But signs suggest that the bright future envisioned in the early days of the internet is still within reach. Increasing awareness of, and dissatisfaction with, the many bottlenecks that the commercial monopoly on research information has imposed are stimulating new strategies for developing the future’s knowledge infrastructures. One of the most promising is the shift toward infrastructures created and supported by academic institutions, the original creators of the information being shared, and nonprofit consortia like the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation and the Center for Open Science….

The Case for an Institutionally Owned Knowledge Infrastructure

“Academic journals, the dominant dissemination platforms of scientific knowledge, have not been able to take advantage of the linking, transparency, dynamic communication and decentralized authority and review that the internet enables. Many other knowledge-driven sectors, from journalism to law, suffer from a similar bottleneck — caused not by a lack of technological capacity, but rather by an inability to design and implement efficient, open and trustworthy mechanisms of information dissemination.

Fortunately, growing dissatisfaction with current knowledge-sharing infrastructures has led to a more nuanced understanding of the requisite features that such platforms must provide. With such an understanding, higher education institutions around the world can begin to recapture the control and increase the utility of the knowledge they produce….

But signs suggest that the bright future envisioned in the early days of the internet is still within reach. Increasing awareness of, and dissatisfaction with, the many bottlenecks that the commercial monopoly on research information has imposed are stimulating new strategies for developing the future’s knowledge infrastructures. One of the most promising is the shift toward infrastructures created and supported by academic institutions, the original creators of the information being shared, and nonprofit consortia like the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation and the Center for Open Science….

Pondering the arrival of the Open Publishing Awards | FORCE11

“This year, Coko’s Founder Adam Hyde organized and launched the Open Publishing Awards with a stated mission to celebrate all things open and publishing. The initial ‘launch’ of the awards via social media and a website debut was in August, and somehow the organization managed to assemble a panel of judges, solicit nominations, plan an event and deliver on a shortlist of winners, all within a few weeks. After the awards ceremony last week at FORCE 2019, it is a good time to stop and think: were the awards successful? How can we assess the success, failure, or utility of awards programs, in general? Is there room for another?

First, we can take a look at the ‘why’ behind the awards. The Open Publishing Awards website makes it clear: they aim to celebrate and raise awareness about all things open and publishing. This year, that meant open software and open content, as those were the two categories that nominations were solicited within. Is it enough to “celebrate” and announce a “shortlist” – or are we really hungry to create single category “winners” the way that other awards programs tend to?

Next, who is ordained to decide a) what is open, and/or b) how open is ‘open’? This is a semantic and ideological discussion that occurs on an ongoing basis. My open may not be open enough for you or vice versa. The category descriptions offered some help, but was it enough? …”

Transitioning punctum books to Open Source Infrastructure · punctum books

“Without open source digital infrastructure, open access publishing has no long-term chance of truly remaining open, that is, not only free to read but also free to write, free to edit, and free to publish. Without a commitment to make, as much as possible, the entire book production pipeline open, the decision of who gets to write and who gets to read will always remain beholden to actors that do not consider the public good their first priority.

An overarching profit motive of any of the vendors that punctum books uses as part of its pipeline posits a risk for our open access ideal: we are as weak as our most commercial link. Furthermore, the implementation of GDPR in the European Union obliges us to be much more careful with what happens with the personal data of our authors and readers – and rightfully so. Like knowledge, privacy is a public good that is at odds with the idea of profit maximalization. The open source community, on the contrary, embraces the public sharing of knowledge while safeguarding the human right to privacy.

Our first step was to find a replacement of the technically most complicated part of the book production process, the book design itself. This brought us to the good folks of Editoria, who are very close to cracking the nut of creating an open source online collaborative environment for the editing of scholarly texts combined with an output engine that creates well designed EPUB, HTML, PDF, and ICML output formats.

Through the COPIM project of Scholarled, punctum books was also already involved in the development of a metadata database and management system (under the codenames Thoth and Hapi) that will be the first free and open source system to generate ONIX, MARC, and KBART records….”