The Case for an Institutionally Owned Knowledge Infrastructure

“Academic journals, the dominant dissemination platforms of scientific knowledge, have not been able to take advantage of the linking, transparency, dynamic communication and decentralized authority and review that the internet enables. Many other knowledge-driven sectors, from journalism to law, suffer from a similar bottleneck — caused not by a lack of technological capacity, but rather by an inability to design and implement efficient, open and trustworthy mechanisms of information dissemination.

Fortunately, growing dissatisfaction with current knowledge-sharing infrastructures has led to a more nuanced understanding of the requisite features that such platforms must provide. With such an understanding, higher education institutions around the world can begin to recapture the control and increase the utility of the knowledge they produce….

But signs suggest that the bright future envisioned in the early days of the internet is still within reach. Increasing awareness of, and dissatisfaction with, the many bottlenecks that the commercial monopoly on research information has imposed are stimulating new strategies for developing the future’s knowledge infrastructures. One of the most promising is the shift toward infrastructures created and supported by academic institutions, the original creators of the information being shared, and nonprofit consortia like the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation and the Center for Open Science….

The Case for an Institutionally Owned Knowledge Infrastructure

“Academic journals, the dominant dissemination platforms of scientific knowledge, have not been able to take advantage of the linking, transparency, dynamic communication and decentralized authority and review that the internet enables. Many other knowledge-driven sectors, from journalism to law, suffer from a similar bottleneck — caused not by a lack of technological capacity, but rather by an inability to design and implement efficient, open and trustworthy mechanisms of information dissemination.

Fortunately, growing dissatisfaction with current knowledge-sharing infrastructures has led to a more nuanced understanding of the requisite features that such platforms must provide. With such an understanding, higher education institutions around the world can begin to recapture the control and increase the utility of the knowledge they produce….

But signs suggest that the bright future envisioned in the early days of the internet is still within reach. Increasing awareness of, and dissatisfaction with, the many bottlenecks that the commercial monopoly on research information has imposed are stimulating new strategies for developing the future’s knowledge infrastructures. One of the most promising is the shift toward infrastructures created and supported by academic institutions, the original creators of the information being shared, and nonprofit consortia like the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation and the Center for Open Science….

Pondering the arrival of the Open Publishing Awards | FORCE11

“This year, Coko’s Founder Adam Hyde organized and launched the Open Publishing Awards with a stated mission to celebrate all things open and publishing. The initial ‘launch’ of the awards via social media and a website debut was in August, and somehow the organization managed to assemble a panel of judges, solicit nominations, plan an event and deliver on a shortlist of winners, all within a few weeks. After the awards ceremony last week at FORCE 2019, it is a good time to stop and think: were the awards successful? How can we assess the success, failure, or utility of awards programs, in general? Is there room for another?

First, we can take a look at the ‘why’ behind the awards. The Open Publishing Awards website makes it clear: they aim to celebrate and raise awareness about all things open and publishing. This year, that meant open software and open content, as those were the two categories that nominations were solicited within. Is it enough to “celebrate” and announce a “shortlist” – or are we really hungry to create single category “winners” the way that other awards programs tend to?

Next, who is ordained to decide a) what is open, and/or b) how open is ‘open’? This is a semantic and ideological discussion that occurs on an ongoing basis. My open may not be open enough for you or vice versa. The category descriptions offered some help, but was it enough? …”

Transitioning punctum books to Open Source Infrastructure · punctum books

“Without open source digital infrastructure, open access publishing has no long-term chance of truly remaining open, that is, not only free to read but also free to write, free to edit, and free to publish. Without a commitment to make, as much as possible, the entire book production pipeline open, the decision of who gets to write and who gets to read will always remain beholden to actors that do not consider the public good their first priority.

An overarching profit motive of any of the vendors that punctum books uses as part of its pipeline posits a risk for our open access ideal: we are as weak as our most commercial link. Furthermore, the implementation of GDPR in the European Union obliges us to be much more careful with what happens with the personal data of our authors and readers – and rightfully so. Like knowledge, privacy is a public good that is at odds with the idea of profit maximalization. The open source community, on the contrary, embraces the public sharing of knowledge while safeguarding the human right to privacy.

Our first step was to find a replacement of the technically most complicated part of the book production process, the book design itself. This brought us to the good folks of Editoria, who are very close to cracking the nut of creating an open source online collaborative environment for the editing of scholarly texts combined with an output engine that creates well designed EPUB, HTML, PDF, and ICML output formats.

Through the COPIM project of Scholarled, punctum books was also already involved in the development of a metadata database and management system (under the codenames Thoth and Hapi) that will be the first free and open source system to generate ONIX, MARC, and KBART records….”

Transitioning punctum books to Open Source Infrastructure · punctum books

“Without open source digital infrastructure, open access publishing has no long-term chance of truly remaining open, that is, not only free to read but also free to write, free to edit, and free to publish. Without a commitment to make, as much as possible, the entire book production pipeline open, the decision of who gets to write and who gets to read will always remain beholden to actors that do not consider the public good their first priority.

An overarching profit motive of any of the vendors that punctum books uses as part of its pipeline posits a risk for our open access ideal: we are as weak as our most commercial link. Furthermore, the implementation of GDPR in the European Union obliges us to be much more careful with what happens with the personal data of our authors and readers – and rightfully so. Like knowledge, privacy is a public good that is at odds with the idea of profit maximalization. The open source community, on the contrary, embraces the public sharing of knowledge while safeguarding the human right to privacy.

Our first step was to find a replacement of the technically most complicated part of the book production process, the book design itself. This brought us to the good folks of Editoria, who are very close to cracking the nut of creating an open source online collaborative environment for the editing of scholarly texts combined with an output engine that creates well designed EPUB, HTML, PDF, and ICML output formats.

Through the COPIM project of Scholarled, punctum books was also already involved in the development of a metadata database and management system (under the codenames Thoth and Hapi) that will be the first free and open source system to generate ONIX, MARC, and KBART records….”

Meet Plume: A new PubSweet platform created by the French Financial Jurisdictions : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“The French financial jurisdictions, which include the Paris-based Cour des comptes (the French Superior Audit Institution) and the regional and territorial chambers of accounts, have been collaborating with Coko for the past 10 months, building an experimental PubSweet platform.

The project is part of a program called Public Interest Entrepreneurs, directed by Etalab, a department of the French Interministerial Directorate for Digital Affairs that promotes open data and open source. The project is headed up by two public interest entrepreneurs, Nikos Peteinatos, designer and member of the Editoria Advisory Group, and Erica Marco, developer.

The system, currently under development, is called Plume, and it leverages the PubSweet framework and community modules, including Editoria, Wax and Paged.js (from the forthcoming Cabbage Tree Labs). The pilot phase of the project ran for ten months, and deemed successful, the team now embarks on a secondary phase over the next six months with two new developers joining the team….

The system’s primary function is to facilitate the authoring of audit reports. It can be thought of as a customized version of Editoria….”

Meet PubSweet – Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms

“PubSweet is Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms. PubSweet enables you to easily build a publishing platform tailored to your own needs. It is designed to be modular and flexible.

PubSweet can be used to rapidly create custom publishing systems. If the existing components do not completely meet your needs, you can focus development on building new components to provide just the new functionality required.

Join the PubSweet community and help us build a common resource of open components for publishing by contributing components back.

Documentation and further information about PubSweet can be found here. Below are Publishing platforms built with PubSweet….”

Meet PubSweet – Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms

“PubSweet is Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms. PubSweet enables you to easily build a publishing platform tailored to your own needs. It is designed to be modular and flexible.

PubSweet can be used to rapidly create custom publishing systems. If the existing components do not completely meet your needs, you can focus development on building new components to provide just the new functionality required.

Join the PubSweet community and help us build a common resource of open components for publishing by contributing components back.

Documentation and further information about PubSweet can be found here. Below are Publishing platforms built with PubSweet….”

Meet PubSweet – Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms

“PubSweet is Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms. PubSweet enables you to easily build a publishing platform tailored to your own needs. It is designed to be modular and flexible.

PubSweet can be used to rapidly create custom publishing systems. If the existing components do not completely meet your needs, you can focus development on building new components to provide just the new functionality required.

Join the PubSweet community and help us build a common resource of open components for publishing by contributing components back.

Documentation and further information about PubSweet can be found here. Below are Publishing platforms built with PubSweet….”