Emory Libraries Blog | Put a badge on it: incentives for data sharing and reproducibility

“How do you encourage researchers to share the data underlying their publications? The journal Psychological Science introduced a digital badge system in 2014 to signify when authors make the data and related materials accompanying their articles openly available. Criteria to earn the Open Data badge include (1) sharing data via a publicly accessible repository with a persistent identifier, such as a DOI, (2) assigning an open license, such as CC-BY or CC0, allowing reuse and credit to the data producer, and (3) providing enough documentation that another researcher could reproduce the reported results (Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices project on the Open Science Framework)….”

OSF | Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices

“There is no central authority determining the validity of scientific claims. Accumulation of scientific knowledge proceeds via open communication with the community. Sharing evidence for scientific claims facilitates critique, extension, and application. Despite the importance of open communication for scientific progress, present norms do not provide strong incentives for individual researchers to share data, materials, or their research process. Journals can provide such incentives by acknowledging open practices with badges in publications….”

Open Science Badges

“What are Open Science Badges?

Badges to acknowledge open science practices are incentives for researchers to share data, materials, or to preregister.

Badges signal to the reader that the content has been made available and certify its accessibility in a persistent location….

 

Badges seem silly. Do they work?

Yes. Implementing these badges dramatically increases the rate of data sharing (Kidwell et al, 2016).

A recent systematic review identified this badging program as the only evidence-based incentive program that this effective at increasing the rates of data sharing (Rowhani-Farid et al., 2017).

View a list of journals and organizations that have adopted badges here….”

CREDIT reflects Complete Workflow

“CREDIT is a cloud-enabled SaaS tool for data management to provide an opportunity to authors to register their Additional Research Outputs(AROs) reflecting RAW, REPEAT & NULL/NEGATIVE entities generated at various stages of research workflow to ensure their reusability & gaining credit. Hence contributing towards enriching research articles & reproducible science. CREDIT framework & interface is developed on FAIR data principles….The appearance of these badges happens dynamically, hence creates a possibility that the metrics around the data, when readers engage with it would be fed back to the main published article in real-time (accessible via the badge – Enhancing Discoverability and also giving credits to Authors). And in the near-future we also have plans to roll out Badges that can be embedded in PDF articles….”

Open Humans

“Open Humans is a program of the nonprofit Open Humans Foundation and has been funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Knight Foundation. Our 2015 launch was written up in Forbes, Newsweek, Scientific American, and more.

You decide when to share. You have valuable data, and you’ll decide when to share it. The data you provide will be private by default. You can choose which projects to share with. You can also opt to make some (or all) of your data public, so anyone can access and research it!

Studies, projects, and more. Browse our activities list to see the many potential data sources you can add, and interesting projects you can join.

Be a part of research. We’ll recognize your contributions with badges on your profile page, invite you to talk to other community members in our online forums, and periodically post new activities, study updates, and relevant interviews in our newsletters and on our blog….”

PsyArXiv Preprints | Suggestions to Advance Your Mission: An Open Letter to Dr. Shinobu Kitayama, Editor of JPSP:ASC

An open letter to the new editor-in-chief of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition, urging the adoption of best practices for data sharing, reproducibility, and open science.

APA Journals Program Collaborates with Center for Open Science to Advance Open Science Practices in Psychological Research

“The American Psychological Association, the nonprofit publisher of 90 psychology journals, has entered a partnership with the Center for Open Science to offer open science badges to authors, create an APA data repository to ease sharing and designate a preferred preprint server for APA journal articles.”

Bologna Open Recognition Declaration (bord)

“Open access to knowledge and education is widely recognised as an irreplaceable factor for social and human growth and an indispensable component to consolidate and enrich citizenship, capable of giving citizens the necessary competencies to face the challenges of the new millennium, together with an awareness of shared values and of belonging to diverse social and cultural spaces. The importance of education and educational cooperation in the development and strengthening of stable, inclusive, peaceful and democratic societies is universally acknowledged as paramount. We now need to add open recognition to this list….This can be supported by encouraging the adoption of more open currencies to capture and share learning achievements whether in formal, informal or nonformal settings….Our consortium is coordinating its actions to reach the following objectives in the short term, which we consider to be of primary relevance in order to establish an Open Architecture for the Recognition of Learning Achievements: [1] Open recognition for all: First, we encourage everyone—learners, educators, citizens and organisations—to actively participate in and take ownership of the emerging open recognition movement. Participating includes: taking personal responsibility in one’s own learning and in the recognition of others’ achievements, contributing to the design, implementation and/or exploitation of local and/or global systems of recognition. [2] Open recognition technologies and infrastructure: Second, we call on the community of learning practitioners and technology developers to establish a trustworthy system of human and machine verifiable learning credentials and to adopt open standards facilitating the comparability and transferability of learning credentials. [3] Open recognition policies: Third, we call on governments, public authorities and educational stakeholders to implement inclusive policies facilitating and encouraging the recognition of learning achievements whether in formal, non-formal and informal settings, with bridges between all three. Those policies should ensure the existence of multiple developmental pathways, increased flexibility and accessibility and the inclusion of socially excluded and disenfranchised groups….”

Open Practice Badges Details

“There is no central authority determining the validity of scientific claims. Accumulation of scientific knowledge proceeds via open communication with the community. Sharing evidence for scientific claims facilitates critique, extension, and application. Despite the importance of open communication for scientific progress, present norms do not provide strong incentives for individual researchers to share data, materials, or their research process. Journals can provide such incentives by acknowledging open practices with badges in publications.

There are circumstances, however, in which open practices are not possible or advisable. For example, sharing some human participant data could violate confidentiality. When badge criteria cannot be met, a description in place of the badge can articulate why. Badges do not define good practice; badges certify that a particular practice was followed. Disclosure makes explicit the conditions under which the ethic of openness is superseded by other ethical concerns. Here, we introduce three badges to acknowledge Open Data, Open Materials, and Preregistration….”

DataTags

“There are many worthy purposes for sharing data widely. In research, data sharing enables replication and validation of scientific findings and maximizes return on research investment, so it is not surprising that sponsors and publishers expect or mandate the sharing of data where possible. In organizations, data sharing leads to insights on operations and opportunities to improve goods and services. However, data containing sensitive information about individuals or personal data collected under various agreements cannot be shared openly without appropriate safeguards. An extensive body of statutes, regulations, institutional policies, consent forms, data sharing agreements, and common practices govern how sensitive data should be used and disclosed in different contexts. Researchers, institutions and companies that manage and share data must interpret how the various legal requirements and other data privacy and security standards apply to their handling of a given dataset. DataTags helps data holders navigate these complex issues….”