Data Sharing in a Time of Pandemic: Patterns

“The resulting recommendations and guidelines on data sharing,

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 published in final form on Jun 30, 2020, are a thorough and comprehensive overview of how to share data (and research software) from multiple disciplines to inform response to a pandemic, along with guidelines and recommendations on data sharing under the present COVID-19 circumstances. It is a long document (more than 140 pages) but is very thorough and well structured….”

How can I get access to the article I need? | EIFL

“In order to help researchers retrieve legal copies of full-text articles that they can’t find in their library, EIFL has created a poster with useful links to other places where they can look for an article they need, such as open access search engines or browser extensions.

We are encouraging librarians to share the poster widely with faculty and students through their university and institutional websites, newsletters and social media. EIFL can help libraries customize the poster, for example, by adding the library’s logo and links to the library’s subscribed e-resources.”

How can I get access to the article I need? | EIFL

“In order to help researchers retrieve legal copies of full-text articles that they can’t find in their library, EIFL has created a poster with useful links to other places where they can look for an article they need, such as open access search engines or browser extensions.

We are encouraging librarians to share the poster widely with faculty and students through their university and institutional websites, newsletters and social media. EIFL can help libraries customize the poster, for example, by adding the library’s logo and links to the library’s subscribed e-resources.”

Open access checklist for books and chapters | Open research | Springer Nature

“Many research funders and institutions worldwide have introduced policies requiring authors to make their research openly accessible, whether through immediate open access publication, or through archiving a version of their manuscript in a repository. An increasing number of these policies apply to monographs and chapters in edited collections. Follow our open access checklist to help you meet the requirements of your funders and institutions, and identify potential sources of book processing charge (BPC) or chapter processing charge (CPC) funding if you are publishing OA.”

 

Open access checklist for books and chapters | Open research | Springer Nature

“Many research funders and institutions worldwide have introduced policies requiring authors to make their research openly accessible, whether through immediate open access publication, or through archiving a version of their manuscript in a repository. An increasing number of these policies apply to monographs and chapters in edited collections. Follow our open access checklist to help you meet the requirements of your funders and institutions, and identify potential sources of book processing charge (BPC) or chapter processing charge (CPC) funding if you are publishing OA.”

 

Open Repositories Conference Handbook – OR Steering Committee – LYRASIS Wiki

“This document is intended to serve both as an aide-memoire for the Open Repositories organization and as a loose guide for each year’s conference organisers. We attempt to keep this as up to date as possible, but there may be areas which are inaccurate. If you have questions, please contact the Chair of the Open Repositories Steering Committee..

Following the overview, the middle sections of the document are essentially a walk through of the conference “creation” process whilst the Appendices contain related documents that will be useful in the process….”

Is it Safe to Use? – Guidelines for re-using images from Wiki sites — Naomi Korn Associates

“When searching for images for commercial use we often turn to Wiki sites as first port of call, but are all the images safe to use for commercial purposes?  Not everything posted in the Commons or Media sites or used on a Wiki page is in fact open access. Some images (particularly in WikiPedia), are there with an explanation that they are used on the site because they are all over the web and nothing else could be found or the licence holder could not be found.  Not everything that says it is “Public Domain” or “Creative Commons 0” actually is, depending on where you live.

It is easy to scroll down to the rights section below the image, and open the blue “More Info” button to check what kind of licence the image carries. There are various types of “CC” licence and the letters after CC tell you whether any restrictions apply. Importantly, you may not be allowed to change the photo (eg crop it or incorporate it into another work (ND) or you may not be allowed to use it commercially (NC). Explanations for the various letter codes can be found here https://creativecommons.org/licenses/.

The issues I will consider fall roughly into two categories: works of art and contemporary photographs of landscapes and architecture. …”

Is it Safe to Use? – Guidelines for re-using images from Wiki sites — Naomi Korn Associates

“When searching for images for commercial use we often turn to Wiki sites as first port of call, but are all the images safe to use for commercial purposes?  Not everything posted in the Commons or Media sites or used on a Wiki page is in fact open access. Some images (particularly in WikiPedia), are there with an explanation that they are used on the site because they are all over the web and nothing else could be found or the licence holder could not be found.  Not everything that says it is “Public Domain” or “Creative Commons 0” actually is, depending on where you live.

It is easy to scroll down to the rights section below the image, and open the blue “More Info” button to check what kind of licence the image carries. There are various types of “CC” licence and the letters after CC tell you whether any restrictions apply. Importantly, you may not be allowed to change the photo (eg crop it or incorporate it into another work (ND) or you may not be allowed to use it commercially (NC). Explanations for the various letter codes can be found here https://creativecommons.org/licenses/.

The issues I will consider fall roughly into two categories: works of art and contemporary photographs of landscapes and architecture. …”

Guidance on Open Educational Practices during School Closures: Utilizing OER under COVID-19 Pandemic in line with UNESCO OER Recommendation

“With the Coronavirus (COVID-19) rapidly spreading worldwide, several countries have initiated several strategies to stop the spread of this virus, including school closures. UNESCO stated that, as of 17 May, almost 1.21 billion learners were affected, accounting for 69.3% of the world’s student population. Particularly, China was the first to adopt the policy of “Disrupted Classes, Undisrupted Learning” by providing online, distance and remote teaching. However, several educational challenges appeared during this unexpected critical situation of COVID-19 outbreak. For instance, in this first-ever application of pure long-term online learning (without face-to-face learning or blended learning), both teachers and learners should not feel that they are left alone during the teaching and learning processes. Additionally, new effective pedagogical approaches are needed to keep learners motivated and engaged during this long period of online learning. To overcome the above challenges, new teaching approaches are needed. In this context, several researchers suggested the use of Open Educational Practices (OEP) and Resources (OER) to provide engaging and interactive experience. UNESCO (2019) also stated that: the judicious application of OER, in combination with appropriate pedagogical methodologies, well-designed learning objects, and the diversity of learning activities, can provide a broader range of innovative pedagogical options to engage both educators and learners to become more active participants in educational processes and creators of content as members of diverse and inclusive Knowledge Societies”. Additionally, UNESCO (2019) provided five objectives that should be focused on facilitation of OER adoption, namely: (i) Building capacity of stakeholders to create access, re-use, adapt and redistribute OER; (ii) Developing supportive policy; (iii) Encouraging inclusive and equitable quality OER; (iv) Nurturing the creation of sustainability models for OER; and (v), Facilitating international cooperation. Therefore, this handbook discusses the use of OEP and OER during COVID-19 outbreak through global vivid stories and experiences, and in line with the five UNESCO objectives. It also discusses OER competencies for OEP. Finally, this handbook provides guidelines to both teachers and learners to facilitate OEP and OER application….”