Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines

Abstract:  The Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Committee met in November 2014 to address one important element of the incentive systems – journals’ procedures and policies for publication. The outcome of the effort is the TOP Guidelines. There are eight standards in the TOP guidelines; each move scientific communication toward greater openness. These standards are modular, facilitating adoption in whole or in part. However, they also complement each other, in that commitment to one standard may facilitate adoption of others. Moreover, the guidelines are sensitive to barriers to openness by articulating, for example, a process for exceptions to sharing because of ethical issues, intellectual property concerns, or availability of necessary resources.

RDA COVID-19 Guidelines and Recommendations | EIFL

“The Research Data Alliance (RDA) COVID-19 Working Group has released draft guidelines and recommendations for sharing research data in ways that support scientific research and policy making during public health emergencies. 

The group is calling for feedback on the draft guidelines. Feedback will inform the Working Group’s discussions and be incorporated into the next version of the guidelines and recommendations. You can post your feedback here. The deadline is 24 May. …”

Launch of Platform for Responsible Editorial Policies – Leiden Madtrics

“With these features, PREP aims to contribute to more responsible journal management and to open science. By supporting authors, reviewers and editors in obtaining information about the editorial process of academic journals, it addresses well-known issues with one of science’s central institutions. By facilitating journal editors and publishers to transparently share their review procedures and by providing suggestions on alternative review options, it additionally aims to support some of the key stakeholders in academic publishing. This should ultimately lead to more open and responsible publishing….”

Creating An Open Data Infrastructure For Better Public Services

“To deploy open data on a local or state level, public offices need to have a sustainable framework. Here’s a full roadmap public institutions could use to introduce the concept of free-to-access-and-share data to communities and staff.

This is a step-by-step checklist of practices that, paired with software consulting service, help design reliable and scalable open data infrastructures….”

TOP (Transparency and Openness Promotion)

“Transparency, open sharing, and reproducibility are core values of science, but not always part of daily practice. Journals, funders, and societies can increase research reproducibility by adopting the TOP Guidelines….”

Guidance for research organisations on how to implement the principles of the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment | Wellcome

The draft guidance […] provides information for Wellcome-funded organisations on how to implement the core principles of the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA).

We want to hear your comments and feedback on this guidance, before we publish an updated and final version in spring 2020. Fill in our short survey (opens in a new tab) by 17:00 GMT, 24 February 2020. 

Guidelines for Evaluating Transformative Open Access Agreements – Office of Scholarly Communication

“In this document we set forth guidelines that the University of California (UC) applies when evaluating systemwide transformative agreements with publishers. Transformative agreements are those that substantially shift payments for subscriptions (reading) into payments for open access (publishing). By intention and design, most such agreements are transitional and thus these guidelines are intended to be used during the years of transition to full open access.  

Transformative agreements — and behavior by publishing partners — should exhibit these characteristics for an agreement to be recommended for adoption at UC.  

UC’s goal of overall expenditure reduction for its journals portfolio provides important context for these guidelines. Within that overall goal, our assessment of publication value along with the degree of conformity to the guidelines in this document may warrant some variation in the level of expenditure UC is willing to make for any particular agreement. Given the goal of overall expenditure reduction, total expenditure in a given agreement will be a more important consideration for larger (more expensive) deals.

These guidelines are derived from the principles set forth by key UC stakeholder groups engaged in shaping our open access efforts. Many of those principles were presented in documents listed in Sources, below….”

Changing the culture of data science | The Alan Turing Institute

“The crisis of reproducibility in science is well known. The combination of ‘publish or perish’ incentives, secrecy around data and the drive for novelty at all costs can result in fragile advances and lots of wasted time and money. Even in data science, when a paper is published there is generally no way for an outsider to verify its results, because the data from which the findings were derived are not available for scrutiny. Such science cannot be built upon very easily: siloed science is slow science.

That’s one of the reasons funders and publishers are beginning to require that publications include access to the underlying data and analysis code. It’s clear that this new era of data science needs a new cultural and practical approach, one which embraces openness and collaboration more than ever before. To this end, a group of Turing researchers have created The Turing Way – an evolving online “handbook” on how to conduct world-leading, reproducible research in data science and artificial intelligence….”

Guidelines on the development of open educational resources policies – UNESCO Digital Library

“UNESCO believes that universal access to high-quality education is key to the building of peace, sustainable social and economic development, and intercultural dialogue. In 2015, the framework for action for the Sustainable Development Goal focused on education (SDG 4) was adopted with a vision to ‘ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.’ …

These guidelines for policy-makers and other stakeholders lay out steps to review, analyse, develop, implement and measure a context-relevant OER policy. They guide but do not determine what governments and involved actors should do in a specific set of circumstances. Instead, they provide a comprehensive framework for governments and institutions to set out their vision and the scope of their policy, then develop a policy masterplan and launch it….”

Transforming the culture of data science | The Alan Turing Institute

“The crisis of reproducibility in science is well known. The combination of ‘publish or perish’ incentives, secrecy around data and the drive for novelty at all costs can result in fragile advances and lots of wasted time and money. Even in data science, when a paper is published there is generally no way for an outsider to verify its results, because the data from which the findings were derived are not available for scrutiny. Such science cannot be built upon very easily: siloed science is slow science.

That’s one of the reasons funders and publishers are beginning to require that publications include access to the underlying data and analysis code. It’s clear that this new era of data science needs a new cultural and practical approach, one which embraces openness and collaboration more than ever before. To this end, a group of Turing researchers have created The Turing Way – an evolving online “handbook” on how to conduct world-leading, reproducible research in data science and artificial intelligence….”