Iterative books: Posthumous publishing in eighteenth-century botany – Bettina Dietz, 2020

Abstract:  The growing number of known plants, and the need repeatedly to correct their names and their taxonomic attributions, demanded strategies for combining the static nature of a printed book with the fluctuating nature of the information it contained. From the second half of the seventeenth century botanists increasingly relied on publishing multiple updated editions of a book instead of attempting to correct, polish, and thus delay the appearance of a manuscript until, in the author’s opinion, it was finished. Provisional by nature, iterative books offered a solution. They were transient, open-ended and open to intervention, whether by one or multiple authors. Taking as an example the posthumous publication of orphaned material and manuscripts, a widespread phenomenon in eighteenth-century botany, this essay will focus on the sequence of iterative books that were published during the first half of the eighteenth century, based on the herbaria and papers left behind by the German botanist Paul Hermann (1646–95).

 

Instant access to code, for any arXiv paper | arXiv.org blog

“In October, arXiv released a new feature empowering arXiv authors to link their Machine Learning articles to associated code. Developed in an arXivLabs collaboration with Papers with Code, the tool was met with great enthusiasm from arXiv’s ML community.

Now, we’re expanding the capability beyond Machine Learning to arXiv papers in every category. And, to better align with our arXiv communities, PwC is launching new sites in computer science, physics, mathematics, astronomy and statistics to help researchers explore code in these fields….”

Papers with Code is Expanding to More Sciences! | by Ross Taylor | PapersWithCode | Dec, 2020 | Medium

“Today we are launching new sites for computer science, physics, mathematics, astronomy and statistics. Partnering with arXiv, you can use these sites to sync code to show on arXiv paper pages. These sites are live today, and the code tab is now enabled for arXiv papers from all fields! Explore (and add code to) our new portal here: https://portal.paperswithcode.com

As a result of this expansion, we are now tracking artifacts for over 600k research papers. This is just the beginning, and we are deepening our coverage in the weeks and months ahead. We hope our efforts increase code availability for all fields of science — making it a research norm — so the entire research community can progress more quickly together!…”

Gaming the Publishing Industry

“Despite the potential variances of method and mediation introduced to publishing via digital platforms, scholarly print publishing in established humanities disciplines continues to rely on a number of longstanding traditions and habits of practice. These habits still privilege academic journals and scholarly monographs or co-edited collections, many of which remain largely inaccessible for purchase to all but well-funded academic libraries. To encourage a broader distribution, exposure, and uptake of our work to expanded audiences, there is a pressing need to diversify publishing opportunities, to circumvent some of the less-accessible venues of scholarly communication, and to overcome restrictive barriers to augmenting and enriching textual content in scholarly work via the inclusion of visual and auditory material (especially when exploring multi-media and multi-modal forms of cultural expression). One potential alternative can be found in the emergent field of digital game scholarship and criticism, which has developed along unique communicative and community lines and which offers unconventional models and diversified potentials for scholarly communication….

Given the challenges that dominant forms of academic print-based scholarship introduce to open-access intentions, it is useful to look for other models of community-building, sharing, and knowledge-production which might be better suited to interdisciplinary, multi-media, multi-modal, open-access explorations of cultural expression, while still allowing for scholarly rigour, peer evaluation, and debate. I’m particularly interested in the way that scholarly critical work on digital games is not just limited to print-based output but has evolved along with the emergence of the internet and social media platforms. Exploring this evolution as well as some of the more successful experiments therein offers a unique perspective on the possibility of alternative, open scholarly communication strategies for scholars who are concerned with the restrictive aspects of traditional scholarly publishing models….”

[2011.07571] Software must be recognised as an important output of scholarly research

Abstract:  Software now lies at the heart of scholarly research. Here we argue that as well as being important from a methodological perspective, software should, in many instances, be recognised as an output of research, equivalent to an academic paper. The article discusses the different roles that software may play in research and highlights the relationship between software and research sustainability and reproducibility. It describes the challenges associated with the processes of citing and reviewing software, which differ from those used for papers. We conclude that whilst software outputs do not necessarily fit comfortably within the current publication model, there is a great deal of positive work underway that is likely to make an impact in addressing this.

 

Containers, genres, and formats, oh my: Creating sustainable concepts by connecting theory, research, practice, and education – Brannon – 2020 – Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This interactive panel brings together researchers, practitioners, and educators to explore ways of connecting theory, research, practice, and LIS education around the issue of information format. Despite a growing awareness of the importance of information format to information seeking, discovery, use, and creation, LIS has no sound, theoretically?informed basis for describing or discussing elements of format, with researchers and practitioners alike relying on know?it?when?they?see?it understandings of format types. The Researching Students’ Information Choices project has attempted to address this issue by developing the concept of containers, one element of format, and locating it within a descriptive taxonomy of other format elements based on well?established theories from the field of Rhetorical Genre Studies. This panel will discuss how this concept was developed and implemented in a multi?institutional, IMLS?grant?funded research project and how panelists are currently deploying and planning to deploy this concept in their own practice. Closing the loop in this way creates sustainable concepts that build a stronger field overall.

 

A web-native approach to open source scientific publishing | Opensource.com

“This summer, eLife was pleased to launch Executable Research Articles (ERAs) in partnership with Stencila, allowing authors to post computationally reproducible versions of their published papers in the open-access journal.

The open source ERA technology stack delivers a truly web-native format that treats live, interactive code as a first-class asset. It was developed to address current challenges around reproducing and reusing published results—challenges mostly caused by the lack of infrastructure for publishers to showcase the richness and sophistication of the computational methods used by researchers in their work.

As part of its mission to transform research communication, eLife invests in open source technology innovation to modernize the infrastructure for science publishing and improve online tools for sharing, using, and interacting with new results. The organization began work on the concept of computationally reproducible papers in 2017, first in partnership with Substance and later, with Stencila, and announced a number of milestones along the road to delivering ERA….”

A web-native approach to open source scientific publishing | Opensource.com

“This summer, eLife was pleased to launch Executable Research Articles (ERAs) in partnership with Stencila, allowing authors to post computationally reproducible versions of their published papers in the open-access journal.

The open source ERA technology stack delivers a truly web-native format that treats live, interactive code as a first-class asset. It was developed to address current challenges around reproducing and reusing published results—challenges mostly caused by the lack of infrastructure for publishers to showcase the richness and sophistication of the computational methods used by researchers in their work.

As part of its mission to transform research communication, eLife invests in open source technology innovation to modernize the infrastructure for science publishing and improve online tools for sharing, using, and interacting with new results. The organization began work on the concept of computationally reproducible papers in 2017, first in partnership with Substance and later, with Stencila, and announced a number of milestones along the road to delivering ERA….”

Help me redesign the scientific paper | Dynamic Ecology

“If scientists spend taxpayer money to generate irreproducible results, the public’s logical response should be to either withhold funds or demand a new process that emphasizes reproducibility….

Collaborative Independent Review is one way that funders, journals and scientists could implement a more reproducible paper….