REF should accommodate more diverse outputs, says study | Times Higher Education (THE)

“The UK’s research excellence framework should evolve to support the growing diversity of scholarly outputs, a major report says.

The study by consultants Rand Europe, who were commissioned by Research England to consider how research assessment might need to evolve over the next decade, draws on a survey of 3,768 academics in England.

 

It says that, while scholars currently produce an average of 4.7 different types of research output, this is likely to increase to 6.5 over the next decade, with 65 per cent of respondents saying that they expected to produce a greater diversity of output.

Respondents said that the three most dominant forms of output were likely to remain journal articles, conference contributions and book chapters. But many mentioned other types of content that they expected to produce more of in future: for example, website content, openly published peer reviews and research reports for external bodies….”

REF should accommodate more diverse outputs, says study | Times Higher Education (THE)

“The UK’s research excellence framework should evolve to support the growing diversity of scholarly outputs, a major report says.

The study by consultants Rand Europe, who were commissioned by Research England to consider how research assessment might need to evolve over the next decade, draws on a survey of 3,768 academics in England.

 

It says that, while scholars currently produce an average of 4.7 different types of research output, this is likely to increase to 6.5 over the next decade, with 65 per cent of respondents saying that they expected to produce a greater diversity of output.

Respondents said that the three most dominant forms of output were likely to remain journal articles, conference contributions and book chapters. But many mentioned other types of content that they expected to produce more of in future: for example, website content, openly published peer reviews and research reports for external bodies….”

Technical and social issues influencing the adoption of preprints in the life sciences [PeerJ Preprints]

Abstract:  Preprints are gaining visibility in many fields. Thanks to the explosion of bioRxiv, an online server for preprints in biology, versions of manuscripts prior to the completion of journal-organized peer review are poised to become a standard component of the publishing experience in the life sciences. Here we provide an overview of current challenges facing preprints, both technical and social, and a vision for their future development, from unbundling the functions of publication to exploring different communication formats.

Technical and social issues influencing the adoption of preprints in the life sciences [PeerJ Preprints]

Abstract:  Preprints are gaining visibility in many fields. Thanks to the explosion of bioRxiv, an online server for preprints in biology, versions of manuscripts prior to the completion of journal-organized peer review are poised to become a standard component of the publishing experience in the life sciences. Here we provide an overview of current challenges facing preprints, both technical and social, and a vision for their future development, from unbundling the functions of publication to exploring different communication formats.

Scholarly Communication Report: Final Draft

“FINDINGS
1. Researchers are embracing non-traditional modes of scholarly output. 
2. Researchers are interested in sharing their work more broadly and more meaningfully than they have in the past.
3. Researchers feel a tension between their desire to create and share broadly and the pressures of tenure and promotion.
4. Researchers view the library as a trusted authority with whom they
would like to partner in advocacy and new scholarly production….”

Open+: Versioning Open Social Scholarship

Abstract:  Advocates of the Open Access (OA) movement have been fighting for free and unfettered access to research output since the early 1990s. Open access is a crucial element of a fair, efficient scholarly communication system where all are able to find, interpret, and use the results of publicly-funded research. Universal open access is more possible now than ever before, thanks to networked technologies and the development of open scholarship policies. But what happens after access to research is provided? In this paper I argue that versioning scholarship across varying modes and formats would move scholarly communication from a straightforward open access system to a more engaging environment for multiple communities.

Open and Shut?: eLife and my unanswered questions

“Reporting on the scholarly publishing world can be a frustrating business these days, not just because the business model for journalism has all but collapsed but because scholarly publishers seem to be becoming increasingly reluctant to engage with reporters in a meaningful way, especially where the topic is open access. Their clear preference is to communicate by press release or managed events like webinars.

Until recently, I had assumed that eLife at least was fully committed to openness. In 2016, for instance, it posted details of its publishing costs. But now I am not so sure….”

One Step Closer to the “Paper of the Future” | Research Data Management @Harvard

“As a researcher who is trying to understand the structure of the Milky Way, I often deal with very large astronomical datasets (terabytes of data, representing almost two billion unique stars). Every single dataset we use is publicly available to anyone, but the primary challenge in processing them is just how large they are. Most astronomical data hosting sites provide an option to remotely query sources through their web interface, but it is slow and inefficient for our science….

To circumvent this issue, we download all the catalogs locally to Harvard Odyssey, with each independent survey housed in a separate database. We use a special python-based tool (the “Large-Survey Database”) developed by a former post-doctoral scholar at Harvard, which allows us to perform fast queries of these databases simultaneously using the Odyssey computing cluster….

To extract information from each hdf5 file, we have developed a sophisticated Bayesian analysis pipeline that reads in our curated hdf5 files and outputs best fits for our model parameters (in our case, distances to local star-forming regions near the sun). Led by a graduate student and co-PI on the paper (Joshua Speagle), the python codebase is publicly available on GitHub with full API documentation. In the future, it will be archived with a permanent DOI on Zenodo. Also on GitHub users will find full working examples of the code, demonstrating how users can read in the publicly available data and output the same style of figures seen in the paper. Sample data are provided, and the demo is configured as a jupyter notebook, so interested users can walk through the methodology line-by-line….”