How a working group began the process of DORA implementation at Imperial College London – DORA

“Even so, it is much easier to sign DORA than to deliver on the commitment that signing entails. And while I would always recommend that universities sign as soon as they are ready to commit, because doing so sends such a positive message to their researchers, they should not put pen to paper without a clear idea of how signing will impact their approach to research assessment, or how they are going to develop any changes with their staff….

Out went phrases such as “contributions to research papers that appear in high-impact journals” to be replaced by “contributions to high quality and impactful research.” The change is subtle but significant – the revised guidance makes it plain that ‘impactful research’ in this context is not a cypher for the JIF; rather it is work “that makes a significant contribution to the field and/or has impact beyond the immediate field of research.” …”

Driving Institutional Change for Research Assessment Reform – DORA

“What is this meeting about?

DORA and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) are convening a diverse group of stakeholders to consider how to improve research assessment policies and practices.
By exploring different approaches to cultural and systems change, we will discuss practical ways to reduce the reliance on proxy measures of quality and impact in hiring, promotion, and funding decisions. To focus on practical steps forward that will improve research assessment practices, we are not going to discuss the well-documented deficiencies of the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) as a measure of quality….”

Cambridge University signs San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment | University of Cambridge

“The University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Press today announce that they have signed up to the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), a set of recommendations agreed in 2012 that seek to ensure that the quality and impact of research outputs are “measured accurately and evaluated wisely”. …”

Peter Suber: The largest obstacles to open access are unfamiliarity and misunderstanding of open access itself

I’ve already complained about the slowness of progress. So I can’t pretend to be patient. Nevertheless, we need patience to avoid mistaking slow progress for lack of progress, and I’m sorry to see some friends and allies make this mistake. We need impatience to accelerate progress, and patience to put slow progress in perspective. The rate of OA growth is fast relative to the obstacles, and slow relative to the opportunities.”

Peter Suber: The largest obstacles to open access are unfamiliarity and misunderstanding of open access itself

I’ve already complained about the slowness of progress. So I can’t pretend to be patient. Nevertheless, we need patience to avoid mistaking slow progress for lack of progress, and I’m sorry to see some friends and allies make this mistake. We need impatience to accelerate progress, and patience to put slow progress in perspective. The rate of OA growth is fast relative to the obstacles, and slow relative to the opportunities.”

UKRI signs San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment – UK Research and Innovation

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has signed an international declaration aimed at strengthening and promoting best practice in the way research is assessed.

The San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment (DORA) recognises the need to improve the ways in which the outputs of research are evaluated with regards to appropriate use of metrics and makes high-level recommendations for how this can be achieved. DORA includes specific recommendations for funders and organisations that undertake evaluation.

The seven Research Councils* are current signatories, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England was a signatory. Research Councils UK (RCUK), the umbrella organisation for the seven Research Councils before the formation of UKRI, signed DORA in February 2018.

UKRI is a member of the Plan S coalition, an international initiative launched to make full and immediate open access to research publications a reality. Plan S recognises DORA and that research needs to be assessed on its own merits rather than on the venue of publication….”

UKRI signs San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment – UK Research and Innovation

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has signed an international declaration aimed at strengthening and promoting best practice in the way research is assessed.

The San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment (DORA) recognises the need to improve the ways in which the outputs of research are evaluated with regards to appropriate use of metrics and makes high-level recommendations for how this can be achieved. DORA includes specific recommendations for funders and organisations that undertake evaluation.

The seven Research Councils* are current signatories, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England was a signatory. Research Councils UK (RCUK), the umbrella organisation for the seven Research Councils before the formation of UKRI, signed DORA in February 2018.

UKRI is a member of the Plan S coalition, an international initiative launched to make full and immediate open access to research publications a reality. Plan S recognises DORA and that research needs to be assessed on its own merits rather than on the venue of publication….”

What Will the Future of Scientific Publishing Look Like? | The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

“Recently though, there have been more and more attempts to change that system and find a new way of measuring scholarly achievements other than via the impact factor. But to change the status quo, what exactly needs to change and how can this be achieved? These are just three of the many issues that were discussed during a Panel Discussion on Wednesday afternoon of the 68thLindau Nobel Laureate Meeting….”

 

Plan S and the Transformation of Scholarly Communication: Are We Missing the Woods? – The Scholarly Kitchen

“My initial disclaimer, if it’s not obvious, is that I am completely supportive of the driving principles and objectives of Plan S. I lead an organization [PLoS] that is – and always has been – Plan S compliant from top to toe. But more than that, I share the goal of a future in which the research literature is fully and immediately open with liberal rights of reuse. And so, I am pleased to see that this bold goal not only remains unchanged but that the feedback process has encouraged (or, in some cases, perhaps forced) stakeholders to support these general principles …

With that battle won, the question is now all about the transition. The revised guidelines show evidence of having listened to stakeholder concerns without watering down the fundamental principles. That’s key, but there are also a number of positive changes that both help to clear up confusion and should make the transition easier….”

Principles and Implementation | Plan S

“With effect from 2021, all scholarly publications on the results from research funded by public or private grants provided by national, regional and international research councils and funding bodies, must be published in Open Access Journals, on Open Access Platforms, or made immediately available through Open Access Repositories without embargo….”