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Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that the 2020 volume of the Annual Review of Political Science has been converted from gated to open access, with all articles published under a CC BY license. The back volumes, dating from 1998, are now freely available. The Annual Review of Political Science is the third of five journals included in a 2020 pilot program for Subscribe to Open.

For further information or to set up an interview, contact Liz Allen, Director of MarCom and Strategic Development at Annual Reviews (lallen@annualreviews.org). 

 

Annual Review of Political Science uses Subscribe to Open to publish 2020 volume open access

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that the 2020 volume of the Annual Review of Political Science has been converted from gated to open access, with all articles published under a CC BY license. The back volumes, dating from 1998, are now freely available. The Annual Review of Political Science is the third of five journals included in a 2020 pilot program for Subscribe to Open.

For further information or to set up an interview, contact Liz Allen, Director of MarCom and Strategic Development at Annual Reviews (lallen@annualreviews.org). 

 

A study of the impact of data sharing on article citations using journal policies as a natural experiment

Abstract:  This study estimates the effect of data sharing on the citations of academic articles, using journal policies as a natural experiment. We begin by examining 17 high-impact journals that have adopted the requirement that data from published articles be publicly posted. We match these 17 journals to 13 journals without policy changes and find that empirical articles published just before their change in editorial policy have citation rates with no statistically significant difference from those published shortly after the shift. We then ask whether this null result stems from poor compliance with data sharing policies, and use the data sharing policy changes as instrumental variables to examine more closely two leading journals in economics and political science with relatively strong enforcement of new data policies. We find that articles that make their data available receive 97 additional citations (estimate standard error of 34). We conclude that: a) authors who share data may be rewarded eventually with additional scholarly citations, and b) data-posting policies alone do not increase the impact of articles published in a journal unless those policies are enforced.

 

transcript OPEN Library Political Science | National Contact Point Open Access

As part of the open-access transformation, we want to give new inspiration for open access to scientific content. Therefore, we have launched the “transcript Open Library Political Science” project in cooperation with the transcript publishing house. The aim of the pilot project is the development of a publisher and library equally manageable, transparent and economically sustainable open-access e-book business model. The deficits of existing approaches should be adequately addressed. That means, that instead of buying the E-Books, the participating libraries enable the open access publication of all forthcoming books “Political Science at transcript 2019” (20 titles) via a fee in the crowdfunding model. Through that, the library budgets unlatch the titles to the benefit of everybody instead of supporting isolated access for single institutions. The model is supported by the Political Science Information Service (FID) at Bremen State and University Library….”

Impact of Social Sciences – Making research articles freely available can help to negate gender citation effects in political science

“In short, when women political scientists make their work freely available online, their research is cited at similar rates to men’s work. This is a very positive finding given the current gender imbalance found in many aspects of the discipline. (Side note: many scholars, regardless of gender, fail to self-archive due to lack of know-how; Carling has written a very helpful primer on the subject. See also Atchison and Bull.)

A final caveat is necessary. These results should be interpreted with caution. First, the finding that OA can help to negate the gender citation advantage is surprising in light of previous research on gendered citation effects. This must be investigated further to determine whether it is an artefact of the data, whether the pattern holds when other data are used, and whether the pattern holds once self-archiving becomes more commonplace in political science. Second, as with any single-discipline study, the results may lack generalisability. There is considerable evidence that GCE varies by discipline, so it will be important to explore the GCE-OA interaction both within and across disciplines.”