Towards universal open access? Why we need bibliodiversity rather than a “silver bullet” | SciELO in Perspective

“As a conclusion, too often, the discussion on open access models is sometimes completely confused, sometimes too simplistic, and usually based on undue generalization of local situations and even singular experiences. It doesn’t reflect properly the variety of parameters that influence the way research is practiced and communicated amongst peers and towards societies at large. Therefore, we desperately need a better-informed discussion based on case studies and probably driven by the actor-network theory because it allows for a modelling of how diverse stakeholders interact in the scholarly communication process. Because we need not only open access, but above all open scholarly communication models that serve the actual needs of the research communities and societies to create knowledge and benefit from it, we need an open access model based on bibliodiversity.”

Clowns to the Left of Me… Jokers to the Right: The Independent Publisher in an Age of Mergers and Acquisitions – The Scholarly Kitchen

“As many smart people have predicted, consolidation within scholarly publishing will continue to make big news well into 2019. Clarivate acquires Kopernio. Elsevier acquires bepress, Plum Analytics, and SSRN. Wiley acquires Atypon, etc., etc. We have also discussed with great interest the desire of the big publishers to offer start-to-finish workflow solutions. Roger Schonfeld warned of “lock in” while others argued business diversification.”

The article itself says little about open access, open source software, or open infrastructure. But the comment section is almost entirely devoted to these topics. 

Red Pulse PHOENIX

“PHOENIX is both a new platform and token (PHX). We’re building on top of the original roadmap that was initially outlined in our whitepaper, adding a new cloud-based knowledge network that connects research consumers with content-producers. PHOENIX will utilize machine learning, natural language processing, and blockchain technology to power a more efficient ecosystem for matching industry experts to clients looking for insights….”

The PHOENIX Report – Red Pulse

“The next phase of our platform development now calls for an upgrade to our core infrastructure to support the upcoming Red Pulse PHOENIX open research platform, which will enable several core elements of our research and knowledge ecosystem….

PHOENIX aims to leverage machine learning, natural language processing, and blockchain technology to create a more efficient and cost-effective ecosystem of knowledge sharing that will have regulatory compliance and accountability built right in….”

Scienceroot | The first Blockchain-Based Scientific Ecosystem

“Our goal is to create an ecosystem where anyone in the scientific community around the globe will have the ability to gather funding, interact, discuss research ideas, collaborate and in the end, publish their work through a more efficient, intuitive and transparent platform.”

Open Library Environment (OLE)

“OLE is a global library community that empowers libraries to collaborate on innovative and open solutions by pooling resources and insights….OLE empowers the library community to re-examine business operations and develop new workflows that reflect the changing nature of scholarship; OLE liberates libraries from outdated models and proprietary technologies through creative collaboration and open source development; OLE collaborates on open source initiatives that strengthen libraries’ capacity to innovate and meet the needs of their users; OLE builds inclusive partnerships focused on financial support, collaborative functional and technical design, software development, and support for OLE partners.

MOAI-iplweb · PyPI | MOAI, an Open Access Server Platform for Institutional Repositories

“MOAI, an Open Access Server Platform for Institutional Repositories

 MOAI is a platform for aggregating content from different sources, and publishing it through the Open Archive Initiatives protocol for metadata harvesting. It’s been built for academic institutional repositories dealing with relational metadata and asset files. What does it do? —————- The MOAI software can aggregate content from different sources, transform it and store it in a database. The contents of this database can then be published in many separate OAI feeds, each with its own configuration. The MOAI software has a very flexible system for combining records into sets, and can use these sets in the feed configuration. It also comes with a simple yet flexible authentication scheme that can be easily customized. Besides providing authentication for the feeds, the authentication also controls the access to the assets. Why MOAI ——– MOAI has been specifically developed for universities, and contains a lot of hard-earned wisdom. The software has been in production use since 2007, and new features have been continually added. In late 2008, the software was completely refactored and packaged under the name “MOAI”. You can read more about this on the `MOAI History`_ page. MOAI is a standalone system, so it can be used in combination with any repository software that comes with an OAI feed such as `Fedora Commons`_, `EPrints`_ or `DSpace`_. It can also be used directly with an SQL database or just a folder of XML files. The MOAI project takes the philosophy that every repository is different and unique, and that an institutional repository is a living thing. It is therefore never finished. Metadata is always changes, improving, and evolves. We think this is healthy. Because of this viewpoint, the MOAI software makes it as easy as possible to add or modify parts of your repository (OAI) services stack. It tries to do this without sacrificing power, and encouraging the re-use of components….”

Wikibase — Home

Wikibase Repository is a MediaWiki extension that lets you store and manage structured, non-relational data in a central, collaboratively managed repository.

Wikibase Client is a MediaWiki extension that lets you retrieve and embed structured data from a central repository into your wiki.
 
Query Service that allows you to query the contents of a Wikibase installation using SPARQL
 
Wikibase is also a set of reusable components that provide a foundation for tasks in the same domain….
 
Wikibase provides an all-purpose data model that takes knowledge diversity, sources and multilingual usage seriously.
 
Wikibase was developed for and is used by Wikidata, the free knowledge base and Wikipedia, the encyclopedia that anyone can edit.
 
Wikibase uses a component based software design that allows reuse without dictating which framework you should use….”

Research Data Infrastructures in the UK: Landscape Report

“This report reviews:

a. the policies and the services that support and promote open research data in

the UK,

b. some of the evidence as to the impact of those policies,

c. the take-up of services,

d. and the adoption of open data and more generally open science practices….”

DARIAH | Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities

DARIAH is an ERIC, a pan-european infrastructure for arts and humanities scholars working with computational methods. It supports digital research as well as the teaching of digital research methods.

How does DARIAH work?
DARIAH is a network. It connects several hundreds of scholars and dozens of research facilities in currently 17 european countries, the DARIAH member countries. In addition DARIAH has several cooperating partner institutions in countries not being a member of DARIAH, and strong ties to many research projects across Europe. People in DARIAH provide digital tools and share data as well as know-how. They organize learning opportunities for digital research methods, like workshops and summer schools, and offer training materials for Digital Humanities.

Working groups
The DARIAH community also works together in working groups, with subjects ranging from the assessment of digital tools to the development of standards and the long term accessibility of research materials. Their activities may vary but they all share one common goal: Providing services to scholars in the arts and humanities and therefore helping to do research at its best.

Want to become part of the network?
DARIAH is open to everyone. Whether you would like to participate in one of DARIAH’s working groups, work towards your country becoming a DARIAH partner, like to see your institution cooperate with DARIAH, or you are just looking for someone to share know-how and to support your research project, get in touch with us: info@dariah.eu….”