Better research through better infrastructure | Wonkhe | Policy Watch

“The inexorable rise of data driven methods, and the parallel rise of open research practice, mean that accessing and sharing huge amounts of data is inevitably going to be a major part of research in the future. In one sense this is a huge opportunity to lower the cost and raise the quality of research – more accessible data means that much more can be learned from a single experiment, and the ready availability of data from peers around the world means that findings can be cross-checked and replicated without having to generate new results.

More and more historical source materials are being digitised and shared through global and regional initiatives – more archives are emerging from library stacks and storage boxes to online databases and image galleries.

But resource storage and archival is a huge expense – both in terms of the raw cost of many terabytes of server and hard-disk space, and the expense of maintaining and updating records to aid discovery (there’ll be a continued marketing and awareness cost too). Current infrastructure provision is piecemeal and variable by discipline. …”

News – New KE Report published – Putting down roots: Securing the future of open access policies – News – Knowledge Exchange

“Following extensive consultation with research funders, institutions and service providers, as well as a workshop with 30 representatives from institutional libraries, research funders and policy makers, we analysed the extent to which OA policies are dependent on a number of non-commercial, compliance-enabling services used by researchers and institutions.

The outcomes of these discussions have been reflected in the final report, which will be used to help develop the case for coordinated international action to support crucial OA services. 

Read more about the workshop and access the full report here….”

How Can Blockchain Help Science? – Inside Bitcoins – News, Price, Events | Inside Bitcoins – News, Price, Events

“Gideon Greenspan, the founder of Coin Science, another London-based blockchain technology company, says Scienceroot and Pluto are both elements of the same “universe.”. The company is planning to provide an open-source, decentralized platform dubbed Multichain. Researchers could use the platform to upload data to the publicly shared digital ledger which won’t be controlled by any individual or group.

Greenspan opposes blockchain projects of Scienceroot and Pluto as it can get very costly to record and maintain all data in the long run. According to Greenspan, recording research data can be even more expensive than cryptocurrencies as it produces more data than virtual currencies….”

Editoria | Write, Edit, Compose, Collaborate

“Editoria™ is a web-based open source, end-to-end, authoring, editing and workflow tool that presses and library publishers can leverage to create modern, format-flexible, standards compliant, book-length works.  Funded by the Mellon Foundation, Editoria™ is a project of the University of California Press and the California Digital Library….”

Pluto interviewed with Research Stash – Pluto Network – Medium

“According to National Science Foundation, 4000 new papers are published within the scientific community every day and the number of annual publications has increased from 1 million in 2000 to more than 2 million in 2013. On the other hand, the publication fees are skyrocketing in the past few decades… wasting of research resources and leading to ineffective communications.

PLUTO a nonprofit based in Seoul, Korea wants to address this issue by creating a Decentralized scholarly communication platform which makes the scholarly communication reasonable and transparent for the scientific community.

Q. Can you tell us about your founding team members and what inspired you to build Pluto Network?

We’re attaching a separate document describing the founding members. We gathered to develop applications using blockchain technology as we were fascinated with the emerging technology and the consequences it would enable. As most of us are graduates from POSTECH, a research-focused science, and technology university in South Korea, it wasn’t long until our concerns on the implementation of the technology concluded that we must integrate it with Scholarly Communication….”

Harvard researchers to help develop cloud-based NIH Data Commons platform – Harvard Gazette

“The National Institute of Health has announced that Harvard co-Principal Investigators Dr. Mercè Crosas and Dr. Timothy Clark are NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase Awardees.

The awards are part of the National Institutes of Health’s new Data Commons program, which will be implemented in a 4-year pilot phase to explore the feasibility and best practices for making digital objects including very large-scale genomics resources, available and computable through collaborative platforms. This will be done on public clouds, virtual spaces where service providers make resources, such as applications and storage, available over the internet. The goal of the NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase is to accelerate biomedical discoveries by making biomedical research data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR) for more researchers….”

eROSA Project at a Glance | Aginfra Erosa

“The strategic goal of e-ROSA is to provide guidance to EU policies by designing and laying the groundwork for a long-term programme aiming at achieving an e-infrastructure for open science in agriculture that would position Europe as a major global player at the forefront of research and innovation in this area….”