Open Access Library | OALibrary

“The Open Access Library offers scientific publications for free. No log-in, no price tag. We give publicly funded research back to you. Connect science and society….

Fill out the form below, make your payment, then upload your work. We will ensure that you are in compliance with every open access requirement detailed by your funder. [1] Fill out the form below. [2] Pay the processing fee of €100. [3] Upload your work. [4] Receive your compliance note [to use with your funder] after verification….”

eInfraCentral Platform

“e-Infrastructures address the needs of European researchers for digital services in terms of networking, computing and data management by fostering the emergence of Open Science. In the context of the European open science agenda there is a need to capitalise on past e-infrastructure investments and develop an e-infrastructure commons. To be able to achieve this there are a number of obstacles that need to address the issue of:

  • service accessibility, interoperability and fragmentationcomprehensibility and clarity + inconsistent use of key performance indicators (KPIs) for assessing added value.

The actions taken by the eInfraCentral project to address these obstacles are by:

  • Structure an open and guided discussion between e-infrastructures to consensually define a common catalogue for their services.
  • Develop a single entry point (one-stop shop) – the eInfraCentral portal – for end users to browse the service catalogue, and enhance the monitoring of key performance indicators (KPIs) that focus on availability and quality of services and user satisfaction.
  • Draw policy and sustainability lessons for the future development of a European e-infrastructure ‘market place’ as an extension of the common service catalogue and portal so that it includes a much broader range of e-infrastructures and services. …”

e-Infrastructures | Digital Single Market

“e-Infrastructures foster the emergence of Open Science, i.e. new working methods based on the shared use of ICT tools and resources across different disciplines and technology domains as well as sharing of results and an open way of working together. Furthermore, e-Infrastructures enable and support the circulation of knowledge in Europe online and therefore constitute an essential building block for the European Research Area (ERA).

The European Commission launched the “European Cloud Initiative – Building a competitive data and knowledge economy in Europe” to capitalise on the data revolution. Under this initiative, a European Data infrastructure will combine world-class supercomputing capability with high-speed connectivity and leading-edge data and sofware services for science, industry and the public sector. This will stimulate Open science and innovation by enabling researchers to access and re-use the huge amounts of scientific data.

The European Cloud initiative will fully unlock the value of big data and foster scientific and technological innovation while helping achieve the objectives of the Digital Single Market Strategy.

More information is available on the European Open Science Cloud webpage….”

Call for tenders: Open Research Europe — The European Commission Open Research Publishing Platform

“Open Research Europe — The European Commission Open Research Publishing Platform

The present call for tender concerns the setting up of a publishing platform for scientific articles as a service for Horizon 2020 beneficiaries. The Platform will provide an open access publishing venue without cost to the beneficiaries of Horizon 2020. The platform will manage the entire publication process, from submission to publication, post-publication curation and preservation, of original articles stemming from Horizon 2020 funding and will implement an open peer-review system. It will also host pre-prints. Published articles and hosted pre-prints will be openly available to all researchers and citizens. Tenderers are called to customize an existing publishing infrastructure solution to the requirements of the European Commission, to develop processes and policies to run the platform as a service, to engage in communication activities for the Platform and to run the service and publish articles in the Platform. The tender is for a Framework Contract with a duration of 4 years….”

A few thoughts on OA Monitoring and CRISs (I) | euroCRIS | Pablo de Castro

“In the wake of the AT2OA workshop on Open Access monitoring to be imminently held in Vienna, the post looks into recent attempts to coordinate the various national-level initiatives that are taking place in the area and suggests some possible prerequisites for this international endeavour to be able to succeed. It also argues that a successful OA monitoring in the pioneering countries should pave the way for other ones to eventually follow for their own progress assessment needs.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           A European Council statement was issued in May 2016 aiming to achieve full Open Access to research outputs by 2020. This was hailed at the time as a major step forwards in the push to widen access to the results of publicly-funded research. Nearly two years later there’s a generalised awareness of the difficulty to reach this political goal across the EU by the proposed deadline. This should however not stop the efforts to achieve further progress and to improve the way Open Access is being implemented – this 100% Open Access objective is clearly achievable in specific countries that will then to some extent provide a best practice approach.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    One of the areas where more work needs to be done is the actual monitoring of the progress in Open Access implementation. This has been on the cards for some time now, since national roadmaps with specific milestones and deadlines for reaching this 100% Open Access started to be produced quite a long time before the European Council meeting itself was held. This national-level discussions have resulted in a number of initiatives to monitor Open Access that are being implemented in different countries. The Knowledge Exchange, that brings together stakeholders like the Jisc in the UK, the DFG in Germany, SURF in the Netherlands, DEFF in Denmark or CSC in Finland, have taken a particularly relevant role in the past couple of years in ensuring that the various national-level approaches to Open Access monitoring would have the opportunity to discuss the progress with each other at a number of workshops….”

WG4:Enabling technologies and infrastructures | FORCE11

“The culture we envision for the Scholarly Commons will not just happen. We need supportive technologies and infrastructures that will enable the culture of the commons to flourish. We need to have discussions about needed technologies in a community fashion so that we can have the unity in approach and the help and support that will be needed to implement the solutions that will actually allow this culture to happen….”

 

 

Principles for Open Scholarly Infrastructures

“Ultimately the question we are trying to resolve is how do we build organizations that communities trust and rely on to deliver critical infrastructures. Too often in the past we have used technical approaches, such as federation, to combat the fear that a system can be co-opted or controlled by unaccountable parties. Instead we need to consider how the community can create accountable and trustworthy organisations. Trust is built on three pillars: good governance (and therefore good intentions), capacity and resources (sustainability), and believable insurance mechanisms for when something goes wrong. These principles are an attempt to set out how these three pillars can be consistently addressed….”