Meet PubSweet – Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms

“PubSweet is Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms. PubSweet enables you to easily build a publishing platform tailored to your own needs. It is designed to be modular and flexible.

PubSweet can be used to rapidly create custom publishing systems. If the existing components do not completely meet your needs, you can focus development on building new components to provide just the new functionality required.

Join the PubSweet community and help us build a common resource of open components for publishing by contributing components back.

Documentation and further information about PubSweet can be found here. Below are Publishing platforms built with PubSweet….”

Meet PubSweet – Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms

“PubSweet is Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms. PubSweet enables you to easily build a publishing platform tailored to your own needs. It is designed to be modular and flexible.

PubSweet can be used to rapidly create custom publishing systems. If the existing components do not completely meet your needs, you can focus development on building new components to provide just the new functionality required.

Join the PubSweet community and help us build a common resource of open components for publishing by contributing components back.

Documentation and further information about PubSweet can be found here. Below are Publishing platforms built with PubSweet….”

Meet PubSweet – Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms

“PubSweet is Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms. PubSweet enables you to easily build a publishing platform tailored to your own needs. It is designed to be modular and flexible.

PubSweet can be used to rapidly create custom publishing systems. If the existing components do not completely meet your needs, you can focus development on building new components to provide just the new functionality required.

Join the PubSweet community and help us build a common resource of open components for publishing by contributing components back.

Documentation and further information about PubSweet can be found here. Below are Publishing platforms built with PubSweet….”

The Plan – Towards a Scholarly Commons

“To do so, the project will undertake the following activities:

Write a Literature Review that situates this work within the current research on scholarly publishing.
Conduct Focus Groups that will provide insight into how libraries currently make decisions about investing in infrastructure.
Develop a Census of Infrastructure that will make visible the current set of platforms, systems, and applications that comprise the system of scholarly publishing
Create a Map of the Scholarly Publishing System that visualizes the results of the census
Write a set of Case Studies of Infrastructure Providers that provide insight into what is required for long-term sustainability for this infrastructure
Conduct a Survey of Investment in Infrastructure by colleges and universities that will document the current state of investment

Develop a Report that synthesizes the materials from our activities and provides recommendations on promising directions to sustain and grow investment in this infrastructure, and if warranted, how to sustain the specific work of this project….

The project begins in September 2018 and concludes in February 2020….”

The Plan – Towards a Scholarly Commons

“To do so, the project will undertake the following activities:

Write a Literature Review that situates this work within the current research on scholarly publishing.
Conduct Focus Groups that will provide insight into how libraries currently make decisions about investing in infrastructure.
Develop a Census of Infrastructure that will make visible the current set of platforms, systems, and applications that comprise the system of scholarly publishing
Create a Map of the Scholarly Publishing System that visualizes the results of the census
Write a set of Case Studies of Infrastructure Providers that provide insight into what is required for long-term sustainability for this infrastructure
Conduct a Survey of Investment in Infrastructure by colleges and universities that will document the current state of investment

Develop a Report that synthesizes the materials from our activities and provides recommendations on promising directions to sustain and grow investment in this infrastructure, and if warranted, how to sustain the specific work of this project….

The project begins in September 2018 and concludes in February 2020….”

A Guest Post from Hindawi – Introducing Phenom Review: Open Source Scholarly Infrastructure by Hindawi – OASPA

“Peer review systems have developed over time to adjust to the changing requirements of different academic journals, pushing the legacy systems to the edge of their capabilities. Most importantly, an ongoing shift towards a more open culture in scholarly communications, including Open Access and Open Data, has created new challenges by bringing to light the inherent limitations of current proprietary infrastructure. 

Now, imagine a world where peer review systems were built in a way that serves the wider research community, reducing duplication of effort, increasing flexibility and editorial control without sacrificing transparency, and bringing the cost of publishing down. What would that world look like and how do we build it? 

This month, a second Hindawi journal will move onto the Phenom Review system, our new peer review platform built entirely open source. Phenom Review is part of Hindawi’s collaboration with Coko utilizing their open source PubSweet framework….”

Plan S, Core Open Access Publishing Standards & Scholastica

Scholastica has released a Product Roadmap detailing new features to help journals comply with Plan S and sustainably meet core publishing standards. The roadmap page also includes answers to Plan S FAQs and a resources section to help publishers stay caught up on Plan S developments and work through the implementation guidelines.

Project Euclid and SPIE announce publishing technology partnership

“Project Euclid and SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, announced today a publishing technology partnership to launch a new Project Euclid platform late in 2020. Project Euclid, jointly managed by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press, is an online host and aggregator of over 100 scholarly journals, book series, and conference proceedings in mathematics and statistics. SPIE will develop and power Project Euclid’s new platform in an innovative technology model that brings nonprofit organizations together for the shared development of major publishing infrastructure….”

The Genomics Research and Innovation Network: creating an interoperable, federated, genomics learning system | Genetics in Medicine

Abstract:  Purpose:

Clinicians and researchers must contextualize a patient’s genetic variants against population-based references with detailed phenotyping. We sought to establish globally scalable technology, policy, and procedures for sharing biosamples and associated genomic and phenotypic data on broadly consented cohorts, across sites of care.

Methods

Three of the nation’s leading children’s hospitals launched the Genomic Research and Innovation Network (GRIN), with federated information technology infrastructure, harmonized biobanking protocols, and material transfer agreements. Pilot studies in epilepsy and short stature were completed to design and test the collaboration model.

Results

Harmonized, broadly consented institutional review board (IRB) protocols were approved and used for biobank enrollment, creating ever-expanding, compatible biobanks. An open source federated query infrastructure was established over genotype–phenotype databases at the three hospitals. Investigators securely access the GRIN platform for prep to research queries, receiving aggregate counts of patients with particular phenotypes or genotypes in each biobank. With proper approvals, de-identified data is exported to a shared analytic workspace. Investigators at all sites enthusiastically collaborated on the pilot studies, resulting in multiple publications. Investigators have also begun to successfully utilize the infrastructure for grant applications.

Conclusions

The GRIN collaboration establishes the technology, policy, and procedures for a scalable genomic research network.