New EU open peer review system stirs debate | Science|Business

“The European Commission’s scientific publishing service has launched a new venue for EU research grantees to publish free-to-read results.

The Open Research Europe platform promises beneficiaries an “easy, high quality peer-reviewed” system at “no cost to them”.

The twist: authors, not editors, choose what they wish to publish – without the delay involved in traditional science publishing, the commission says.

The platform, set up to speed the flow of scientific information generated from its seven-year, €85 billion Horizon Europe programme, will post original publications in all fields of science in advance of peer review. Only after the articles are on the platform will the “transparent, invited and open peer review” begin. The names of the reviewers will be open, as well as their reviews.

The London-based open science publisher F1000 Research will run the system, with the commission picking up the tab for article processing charges.

With this model, the commission is playing catch up with some early-adopters. In 2016, Wellcome Trust, the largest charitable funder of biomedical research in Europe, contracted F1000Research to manage its open access publishing platform, Wellcome Open Research. Since then, many other major funders and institutions, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, have contracted F1000 to set up similar platforms.

In a letter last week to Horizon grantees, the commission’s research and innovation director-general Jean-Eric Paquet says, “Your involvement is key to making this initiative a success.” The formal launch of the platform will be early 2021, but submissions will start in a few weeks, the commission said.

Reaction to the new site is mixed, with some researchers highlighting the flaws of the open review method….”

Zenodo – Research. Shared.

“Zenodo code is itself open source, and is built on the foundation of the Invenio digital library which is also open source. The work-in-progress, open issues, and roadmap are shared openly in GitHub, and contributions to any aspect are welcomed from anyone.

All meta data is openly available under CC0 licence, and all open content is openly accessible through open APIs.

Open to all suggestions for new features, via GitHub, and especially open to all contributions of code via pull requests!…”

COAR, TCC Africa and AfricArXiv sign partnership agreement – AfricArXiv

“We are pleased to announce that the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) and TCC Africa in collaboration with AfricArXiv have signed a partnership agreement focused on strengthening capacity and infrastructure for Open Science in Africa. …

The aim of the partnership is to work together to foster the concept of bibliodiversity through information sharing, capacity building, and advocacy work, as well as enable AfricArXiv to engage with international peers in Africa and globally about best practices and next generation repository functionalities….”

Prepare your paper for submission to Open Research Europe (ORE)

“Over the last 6 months we have been busy building the platform which will welcome submissions from Horizon 2020 grantees in all disciplines, during and after the end of Horizon 2020 grants. The European Commission will be covering the APCs and so it will be completely cost-free for you to publish your research on the platform. 

ORE is on track for its official launch in March 2021 with peer-reviewed publications in all scientific fields. From now until then, there will be more frequent announcements from us about the platform, starting with:…

We are actively seeking submissions ahead of the formal launch in early 2021. These submissions will be published as preprints and will have been peer-reviewed by the time the platform launches. They will thus be part of the group of the first Horizon 2020 peer-reviewed publications to appear in Open Research Europe. If you are an Horizon 2020 grant recipient, please extend this message to all researchers who are contributing to your Horizon 2020 project. The submission system for the platform will open at the end of November 2020. …”

Connecting the Knowledge Commons — From Projects to Sustainable Infrastructure – The End of a Centralized Open Access Project and the Beginning of a Community-Based Sustainable Infrastructure for Latin America – OpenEdition Press

Abstract:  The Latin American region has an ecosystem where the nature of publication is conceived as the act of making public, of sharing, not as the publishing industry. International, national and institutional contexts have led to redefine a project—Redalyc.org—that began in 2003 and that has already fulfilled its original mission: give visibility to knowledge coming from Latin America and promote qualitative scientific journals. Nevertheless, it has to be transformed from a Latin American platform based in Mexico into a community-based regional infrastructure that continues assessing journals’ quality and providing access to full-text, thus allowing visibility for journals and free access to knowledge. It is a framework that generates technology in favor of the empowerment and professionalization of journal editors, making sustainable the editorial task in open access so that Redalyc may sustain itself collectively. This work describes Redalyc’s first model, presents the problematic in process and the new business model Redalyc is designing and adopting to operate.

 

Atlas Open Science, executive summary

“Atlas is a disintermediated open science publishing platform that will disrupt today’s antiquated publishing paradigm and reintegrate the non-professional scientific community within the scientific process. The Atlas platform is designed to: 

EQUITIZE scientists as modern day content creators by introducing impact-based revenue streams.

REDEFINE scientific impact through the lens of publication quality – not the publisher owned journals. 

INVITE the global community to actively participate in the scientific process through direct engagement, transparency, and accessibility….”

Atlas Open Science, executive summary

“Atlas is a disintermediated open science publishing platform that will disrupt today’s antiquated publishing paradigm and reintegrate the non-professional scientific community within the scientific process. The Atlas platform is designed to: 

EQUITIZE scientists as modern day content creators by introducing impact-based revenue streams.

REDEFINE scientific impact through the lens of publication quality – not the publisher owned journals. 

INVITE the global community to actively participate in the scientific process through direct engagement, transparency, and accessibility….”

MSU Careers Details – Technical Lead, The Commons / Information Technologist II

“The College of Arts & Letters (CAL) and the MSU Libraries seek an Information Technologist II to fill the Technical Lead role supporting the development of The Commons, a nonprofit academic professional network serving scholars across the disciplines and around the world.  This is a full-time, 24-month end-dated position, with the possibility of renewal. 

 

The successful candidate will be an up-and-coming leader in academic WordPress development, with a commitment to building and maintaining a large-scale scholar-focused network. The candidate will also have outstanding organizational and interpersonal skills, deep intellectual curiosity, and the ability to work both independently and collaboratively on a distributed team.

Specific areas of responsibility for this position include:

Prototyping and developing new platform integrations and features
Tracking and resolving bug reports and other user feedback
Designing and implementing a federated, scalable architecture for network growth
Ensuring full adherence with network accessibility standards and consistently improving platform user experience
Creating full documentation both for code developed and for network deployment processes
Working with the Commons team to shape the project’s roadmap, prioritize development goals, and deliver on those goals….”

Partner with PeerJ to build a new ecosystem for society publishing

Earlier this year we wrote about a renewed focus on community at PeerJ. This post is the first in a series on new programs and innovations we’re launching at PeerJ as part of our community development. 

In this post we:

  • Consider the pressures on scholarly societies and their members in the current landscape
  • Describe new publishing opportunities at PeerJ for societies and member associations
  • Call for partners to help us build a new and productive ecosystem for society publishing

A recurring theme in our research in the Communities Team has been the future of scholarly societies. Whether it’s authors choosing to publish with us to meet OA requirements their society cannot fulfill; concerns from society board members about slowly but steadily falling membership and financial reserves (exacerbated by conferences cancelled this year and next due to COVID-19); or societies wanting to launch and manage an OA journal, but put off by the complexity, cost and ongoing investment to maintain and sustain a fledgling title: the current dynamics in STM publishing can make life difficult for societies, especially smaller membership organizations. Meanwhile, the focus of many publishers has been on alternative business models and transformative deals at the institutional/funder level. 

Here at PeerJ we believe that scholarly societies and the communities they support and develop are vital to a thriving academic and research ecosystem, so we are hoping to offer an opportunity to societies and a solution to many of their concerns. 

Society Publishing with PeerJx

We are currently seeking partners to co-develop a new ecosystem for societies that we believe can answer many of the concerns we have heard. Our first step towards this new ecosystem is to develop PeerJx. 

Inspired by the relationship between TED and TEDx events, PeerJx focuses on local research communities and membership organizations. PeerJx partner sites are built on PeerJ’s journal portfolio, platform and infrastructure, but partners have their own editorial responsibilities and community development opportunities. Partners and their members benefit from the platform, service and reputation of PeerJ – and our highly-regarded portfolio of indexed, peer-reviewed journals – with the opportunity to build their own publication pathway, increase their member numbers, and develop their community and opportunities for them to interact.

PeerJx is designed around choice and flexibility for our partners. We know one size won’t fit everyone, so partners can integrate their own branding, and choose the editorial model, community tools, website configuration and even business model to create a bespoke publishing outlet best suited to their organization and members. 

Choose your journals

Choose to partner with PeerJ and you can choose which PeerJ journals to build into your PeerJx publishing pathway. 

PeerJx removes the administrative effort and cost of launching a new journal, and allows your members to submit to the highly regarded and indexed journals in PeerJ’s portfolio. Our journals’ excellent reputation, broad audience and high-quality peer review standards means your members can submit to your PeerJx knowing their research will be highly visible, widely disseminated, indexed in all the important databases and responsibly archived. Your members can choose to submit to any of our seven journals.

Choose your editorial model

Choose to take control of your publishing pathway. Partners can choose to form their own Senior Editorial Team and Editorial Board, and choose whether they want to curate content including blogs, news and announcements into their PeerJx site alongside their community’s research articles. There are three initial PeerJx editorial models:

Choose to reduce publishing costs for your members

Members of partner organizations submitting to their society’s PeerJx will enjoy a discount on our standard Article Processing Charges, or can purchase of one of our PeerJ Membership packages.

Partners can also choose to take collective action to reduce the cost of publishing for their members. Partner societies have the option to choose from a sliding scale of annual contributions – based on the size of their membership – to reduce article processing charges for their members. 

We anticipate developing business models in tandem with prospective partners to ensure the publishing with PeerJ is as accessible as possible. Our aim is to eliminate cost as a barrier to partners from participating.

As the PeerJ Partner Publishing Program develops and grows we intend to build models and revenue streams that will result in reductions to the publishing costs for Partners’ Members and profit shares with Partner organizations.

Choose to partner with PeerJ

We want to build an accessible, equitable solution for societies and members organizations seeking their own publishing outlet – or an Open Access option to compliment their current publications – without the cost and administrative burden of launching and maintaining a new journal. The PeerJ Partner Publishing Program and the PeerJx concept are still in their nascency and we hope partners will choose to work with us to help develop the program and its core concepts to ensure they meet your requirements.

Want to find out more?

If you’d like to find out more, you can download the PeerJ Partner Publishing Program prospectus here. We’d love to have the opportunity to talk through in more detail what societies would want from such a partnership – we want to develop the core concepts with prospective partners so we build something they want and need. If you’d like to help us develop a new and flourishing ecosystem for open access society publishing please get in touch: nathaniel.gore@peerj.com 

Partner with PeerJ to build a new ecosystem for society publishing

Earlier this year we wrote about a renewed focus on community at PeerJ. This post is the first in a series on new programs and innovations we’re launching at PeerJ as part of our community development. 

In this post we:

  • Consider the pressures on scholarly societies and their members in the current landscape
  • Describe new publishing opportunities at PeerJ for societies and member associations
  • Call for partners to help us build a new and productive ecosystem for society publishing

A recurring theme in our research in the Communities Team has been the future of scholarly societies. Whether it’s authors choosing to publish with us to meet OA requirements their society cannot fulfill; concerns from society board members about slowly but steadily falling membership and financial reserves (exacerbated by conferences cancelled this year and next due to COVID-19); or societies wanting to launch and manage an OA journal, but put off by the complexity, cost and ongoing investment to maintain and sustain a fledgling title: the current dynamics in STM publishing can make life difficult for societies, especially smaller membership organizations. Meanwhile, the focus of many publishers has been on alternative business models and transformative deals at the institutional/funder level. 

Here at PeerJ we believe that scholarly societies and the communities they support and develop are vital to a thriving academic and research ecosystem, so we are hoping to offer an opportunity to societies and a solution to many of their concerns. 

Society Publishing with PeerJx

We are currently seeking partners to co-develop a new ecosystem for societies that we believe can answer many of the concerns we have heard. Our first step towards this new ecosystem is to develop PeerJx. 

Inspired by the relationship between TED and TEDx events, PeerJx focuses on local research communities and membership organizations. PeerJx partner sites are built on PeerJ’s journal portfolio, platform and infrastructure, but partners have their own editorial responsibilities and community development opportunities. Partners and their members benefit from the platform, service and reputation of PeerJ – and our highly-regarded portfolio of indexed, peer-reviewed journals – with the opportunity to build their own publication pathway, increase their member numbers, and develop their community and opportunities for them to interact.

PeerJx is designed around choice and flexibility for our partners. We know one size won’t fit everyone, so partners can integrate their own branding, and choose the editorial model, community tools, website configuration and even business model to create a bespoke publishing outlet best suited to their organization and members. 

Choose your journals

Choose to partner with PeerJ and you can choose which PeerJ journals to build into your PeerJx publishing pathway. 

PeerJx removes the administrative effort and cost of launching a new journal, and allows your members to submit to the highly regarded and indexed journals in PeerJ’s portfolio. Our journals’ excellent reputation, broad audience and high-quality peer review standards means your members can submit to your PeerJx knowing their research will be highly visible, widely disseminated, indexed in all the important databases and responsibly archived. Your members can choose to submit to any of our seven journals.

Choose your editorial model

Choose to take control of your publishing pathway. Partners can choose to form their own Senior Editorial Team and Editorial Board, and choose whether they want to curate content including blogs, news and announcements into their PeerJx site alongside their community’s research articles. There are three initial PeerJx editorial models:

Choose to reduce publishing costs for your members

Members of partner organizations submitting to their society’s PeerJx will enjoy a discount on our standard Article Processing Charges, or can purchase of one of our PeerJ Membership packages.

Partners can also choose to take collective action to reduce the cost of publishing for their members. Partner societies have the option to choose from a sliding scale of annual contributions – based on the size of their membership – to reduce article processing charges for their members. 

We anticipate developing business models in tandem with prospective partners to ensure the publishing with PeerJ is as accessible as possible. Our aim is to eliminate cost as a barrier to partners from participating.

As the PeerJ Partner Publishing Program develops and grows we intend to build models and revenue streams that will result in reductions to the publishing costs for Partners’ Members and profit shares with Partner organizations.

Choose to partner with PeerJ

We want to build an accessible, equitable solution for societies and members organizations seeking their own publishing outlet – or an Open Access option to compliment their current publications – without the cost and administrative burden of launching and maintaining a new journal. The PeerJ Partner Publishing Program and the PeerJx concept are still in their nascency and we hope partners will choose to work with us to help develop the program and its core concepts to ensure they meet your requirements.

Want to find out more?

If you’d like to find out more, you can download the PeerJ Partner Publishing Program prospectus here. We’d love to have the opportunity to talk through in more detail what societies would want from such a partnership – we want to develop the core concepts with prospective partners so we build something they want and need. If you’d like to help us develop a new and flourishing ecosystem for open access society publishing please get in touch: nathaniel.gore@peerj.com