Addgene’s AAV Data Hub | Open Neuroscience

“AAV are versatile tools used by neuroscientists for expression and manipulation of neurons. Many scientists have benefited from the high-quality, ready-to-use AAV prep service from Addgene, a nonprofit plasmid repository. However, it can be challenging to determine which AAV tool and techniques are best to use for an experiment. Scientists also may have questions about how much virus to inject or which serotype or promoter should be used to target the desired neuron or brain region. To help scientists answer these questions, Addgene launched an open platform called the AAV Data Hub (https://datahub.addgene.org/aav/) which allows researchers to easily share practical experimental details with the scientific community (AAV used, in vivo model used, injection site, injection volumes, etc.). The goal of this platform is to help scientists find the best AAV tool for their experiments by reviewing combined data from a broad range of research labs. The AAV Data Hub launched in late 2019 and over 100 experiments have since been contributed to this project. The dataset includes details and images from experiments conducted in six different species and several different expression sites….”

Biologer: an open platform for collecting biodiversity data

Abstract:  Background

We have developed a new platform named “Biologer” intended for recording species observations in the field (but also from literature resources and collections). The platform is created as user-friendly, open source, multilingual software that is compatible with Darwin Core standard and accompanied by a simple Android application. It is made from the user’s perspective, allowing everyone to choose how they share the data. Project team members are delegated by involved organisations. The team is responsible for development of the platform, while local Biologer communities are engaged in data collection and verification.

New information

Biologer has been online and available for use in Serbia since 2018 and was soon adopted in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. In total, we have assembled 536 users, who have collected 163,843 species observation records data from the field and digitalised 33,458 literature records. The number of active users and their records is growing daily. Out of the total number of gathered data, 89% has been made open access by the users, 10% is accessible on the scale of 10×10 km and only 1% is closed. In the future, we plan to provide a taxonomic data portal that could be used by local and national initiatives in Eastern Europe, aggregate all data into a single web location, create detailed data overview and enable fluent communication between users.

Biologer: an open platform for collecting biodiversity data

Abstract:  Background

We have developed a new platform named “Biologer” intended for recording species observations in the field (but also from literature resources and collections). The platform is created as user-friendly, open source, multilingual software that is compatible with Darwin Core standard and accompanied by a simple Android application. It is made from the user’s perspective, allowing everyone to choose how they share the data. Project team members are delegated by involved organisations. The team is responsible for development of the platform, while local Biologer communities are engaged in data collection and verification.

New information

Biologer has been online and available for use in Serbia since 2018 and was soon adopted in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. In total, we have assembled 536 users, who have collected 163,843 species observation records data from the field and digitalised 33,458 literature records. The number of active users and their records is growing daily. Out of the total number of gathered data, 89% has been made open access by the users, 10% is accessible on the scale of 10×10 km and only 1% is closed. In the future, we plan to provide a taxonomic data portal that could be used by local and national initiatives in Eastern Europe, aggregate all data into a single web location, create detailed data overview and enable fluent communication between users.

Project ReShare: Building a Community-Owned Resource Sharing Platform: The Serials Librarian: Vol 78, No 1-4

Abstract:  Project ReShare is a community-driven effort to build an open-source, highly scalable resource sharing platform that supports the research lifecycle from discovery through fulfillment. The project’s initial focus will be on designing tools to facilitate reciprocal borrowing agreements within library consortia, including a shared index, request management system, and workflows for unmediated borrowing. This paper introduces ReShare and describes how the project partners are working to improve the resource sharing experience for library users and staff. It provides background about the project, describes development goals and progress, and addresses future possibilities for ReShare beyond its initial release.

 

New Editoria Release – Oia : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“Oia is the name of the latest Editoria release out today. Oia is part of the municipality of Santorini, Greece. Alex Georgantas, Coko Dev and lead Editoria developer has been hard at work over the last months and we are proud to announce the release of Editoria Oia!

There have been many new features, and some fixes, added to Editoria in this release, however the main item is the new Asset manager. The Asset Manager takes Editoria along a lot of new paths which pushes the tool further into a league of its own wen it comes to professional book creation tools….”

EU Open Science Policy Platform Final Report

The European Commission (EC)’s Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG R&I) published the final report of the second mandate of the European Open Science Policy Platform (OSPP), entitled “Progress on Open Science: Towards a Shared Research Knowledge System“. The European OSPP is a High-Level Advisory Group established by the EC DG R&I in May 2016 and made up of 25 expert representatives of the broad constituency of European science stakeholders. This OSPP final report provides a brief overview of its four-year mandate (from 2016 to 2020), followed by an update on progress over the past two years since the publication of the OSPP’s recommendations across the EC’s eight ambitions on Open Science. It proposes a vision for moving beyond Open Science to create a shared research knowledge system by 2030.

Scaling Up a Collaborative Consortial Institutional Repository

“Within our IMLS grant project, we have been working hard with our product management team and developer Notch8 to define and develop consortially-focused improvements to Hyku. For example, last month we shared some logistics for building collaborative workflows, working towards a master dashboard to control multi-tenant user permissions.

At the same time as these development activities are taking place, this project has also focused on the practical aspect of making the existing version of Hyku usable for our consortial partners to pilot as a working institutional repository.  Our work has thus branched into two separate areas: Development and Production.

The Production arm of our work focuses on readying the existing Hyku Commons product for real-world pilot use starting this summer.  As a result of user testing from both the PALNI and PALCI sides, we’ve been submitting tickets for small bug fixes and minor improvements which are now happening parallel to the development of features as outlined in the IMLS grant.  Notch8 has devoted a lot of resources to our project in both arenas, and we’ve established a great working relationship and clear communication of needs from both sides….”

COAR survey finds no large barriers for repository platforms in complying with Plan S – COAR

“In 2019, a group of funders known as cOAlition S adopted Plan S, a set of principles and requirements for full and immediate Open Access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from the research they fund, beginning in 2021. One of the routes for complying with Plan S is for authors to make the final published version (Version of Record, VoR) or the Author’s Accepted Manuscript (AAM) openly available with an open license in a Plan S compliant repository with immediate OA from the date of publication.

In order to support compliance with Plan S, repository software platforms, repository managers and researchers (who use the repositories) will need to be aware of the requirements and, in some cases, adopt new practices and functionalities. In April/May 2020 the COAR, in consultation with cOAlition S, conducted a survey of repository platforms in order to assess their current ability and intention to support Plan S requirements, and to identify any specific challenges related to their implementation.

The survey found that most repository platforms currently support compliance with Plan S mandatory criteria and, in the few cases where they do not, there are plans to adopt this functionality. In addition, many of the highly recommended criteria are also already supported by the platforms. As a next step, COAR and cOAlition S will continue to work together to ensure that repositories are well represented and to develop more detailed guidance that assist them in supporting the major functionalities envisioned in Plan S….”

COAR survey finds no large barriers for repository platforms in complying with Plan S – COAR

“In 2019, a group of funders known as cOAlition S adopted Plan S, a set of principles and requirements for full and immediate Open Access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from the research they fund, beginning in 2021. One of the routes for complying with Plan S is for authors to make the final published version (Version of Record, VoR) or the Author’s Accepted Manuscript (AAM) openly available with an open license in a Plan S compliant repository with immediate OA from the date of publication.

In order to support compliance with Plan S, repository software platforms, repository managers and researchers (who use the repositories) will need to be aware of the requirements and, in some cases, adopt new practices and functionalities. In April/May 2020 the COAR, in consultation with cOAlition S, conducted a survey of repository platforms in order to assess their current ability and intention to support Plan S requirements, and to identify any specific challenges related to their implementation.

The survey found that most repository platforms currently support compliance with Plan S mandatory criteria and, in the few cases where they do not, there are plans to adopt this functionality. In addition, many of the highly recommended criteria are also already supported by the platforms. As a next step, COAR and cOAlition S will continue to work together to ensure that repositories are well represented and to develop more detailed guidance that assist them in supporting the major functionalities envisioned in Plan S….”

Eurodoc Survey on Publishing in Open Science for Early Career Researchers

“Later this year, the European Commission will launch ‘Open Research Europe’ (ORE), an open access Publishing Platform for Horizon 2020 beneficiaries. ORE will offer rapid publication of a wide range of article types without editorial bias. All articles will benefit from transparent peer review and will be published under an open license. ORE is a significant step towards Open Science in Europe. Eurodoc, as an expert partner in the project, will ensure that the voice of early-career researchers is heard.

This survey aims to provide the ORE project team with insights related to awareness, perception and experience with open practices and tools, from the perspective of doctoral candidates and junior researchers. Let’s make an impact together!”