African Academy of Sciences | AAS Open Research | News

“The African Academy of Sciences, in partnership with F1000, is launching a publication platform, AAS Open Research, to enable AAS funded and affiliated researchers to publish immediately and without barriers. AAS Open Research will showcase African research on the global stage in an innovative and transparent way. It will launch in early 2018, AAS- affiliated include its Fellows, Affiliates and those funded through the funding and science agenda platform that the Academy created with the NEPAD Agency, the Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA) will be able to publish there.”

Peter Suber, Half a dozen reasons why I support the Jussieu Call for Open Science and Bibl…

“1. I support its call to move beyond PDFs. This is necessary to bypass publisher locks and facilitate reuse, text mining, access by the visually impaired, and access in bandwidth-poor parts of the world. 

2. I applaud its recognition of no-fee or no-APC open-access journals, their existence, their value, and the fact that a significant number of authors will always depend on them. 

3. I join its call for redirecting funds now spent on subscription journals to support OA alternatives. 

4. I endorse its call to reform methods of research evaluation. If we want to assess quality, we must stop assuming that impact and prestige are good proxies for quality. If we want to assess impact, we must stop using metrics that measure it badly and create perverse incentives to put prestige ahead of both quality and access.

5. I support its call for infrastructures that are proof against privatization. No matter how good proprietary and closed-source platforms may initially be, they are subject to acquisition and harmful mutation beyond the control of the non-profit academic world. Even without acquisition, their commitment to OA is contingent on the market, and they carry a permanent risk of trapping rather than liberating knowledge. The research community cannot afford to entrust its research to platforms carrying that risk. 

6. Finally I support what it terms bibliodiversity. While we must steer clear of closed-source infrastructure, subject to privatization and enclosure, we must also steer clear of platform monocultures, subject to rigidity, stagnation, and breakage. Again, no matter how good a monoculture platform may initially be, in the long run it cannot be better than an ecosystem of free and open-source, interoperable components, compliant with open standards, offering robustness, modularity, flexibility, freedom to create better modules without rewriting the whole system, freedom to pick modules that best meet local needs, and freedom to scale up to meet global needs without first overcoming centralized constraints or unresponsive decision-makers. …”

ScienceOpen launches new Open Access journal hosting services – ScienceOpen Blog

Recently, we announced a new Open Access hosting partnership with UCL Press. But just what does this mean, exactly?

Our customised hosting services are designed to help publishers showcase and distribute the Open Access journals that they publish to maximum effect. These are the natural extension of our marketing and indexing services, developed on the basis of our years of experience in content management architecture layered with advanced discovery technologies. By working with a range of publishers and content types, we have built a flexible platform to inter-connect scholarly articles at the level of their metadata, and establish a forum for user interaction around them. For Open Access journals, however, we are able to offer further advantages by embedding the full text articles within our discovery environment.

ScholarlyHub

“At ScholarlyHub we believe that a critical attitude does not stop with the platforms we use. Growing threats to open science have made it more crucial than before to develop a sustainable, not-for-profit environment. One that allows you to publish, share, and access quality work without financial constraints; find and work with colleagues in fields you’re interested in; develop research and teaching projects; store datasets securely, and mentor and be mentored in order to improve your work and help others. Above all, we want to foster an environment that meets our needs as individuals and scholarly communities and where we are in control, not myopic political agendas, greedy publishers, or data merchants. We believe that scholarship does little good behind pay walls, that metrified rankings rarely promote innovative research, and that transparent communication is vital to quality scholarship and healthy societies. Therefore we’re taking the best of the new and the best of the tried to create a truly open-access repository, publishing service, and scholarly social networking site, with large scope for members’ initiatives. And it will be run by scholars: not for profit, greater market share, or political kudos, but for their own growth and everyone’s benefit….”

Open Source Publishing and Distribution Platform for OA Books – Open Book Publishers

“An important part of OBP’s business model has been the ability to harness emerging digital technologies to bring down the publication costs associated with scholarly texts. In addition we have developed an extensive and cost effective distribution network for both digital and printed editions of our titles.

We now intend to reformat and update our software and processes for release as Open Source content, and make all the code freely available for others to adopt and adapt from our GitHub account. As we will be using and maintaining this code for our own operations, on completion we will be in a position to provide a complete, modular, managed, Open Source book publishing and distribution platform for others to freely adopt as they wish.”

Is the Center for Open Science a Viable Alternative for Elsevier? – Enago Academy

“Data management has become an increasingly discussed topic among the academic community. Managing data is an element of open science, which has proven to increase dissemination of research and citations for journal articles. Open science increases public access to academic articles, mostly through preprint repositories. Indeed, according to this study, open access (OA) articles are associated with a 36-172% increase in citations compared to non-OA articles. Publishers such as Elsevier have acquired preprint repositories to increase the dissemination of academic research.”

African Open Science Platform

“The Science International Accord on ‘Open Data in a Big Data World’ presents an inclusive vision of the need for and the benefits of Open Data for science internationally, and in particular for Lower and Middle Income Countries. A major outcome is the African Open Science Platform initiative, supported by the South African Department of Science and Technology, directed by CODATA and implemented by ASSAf.

The development of an open science and innovation platform depends not only on the physical infrastructure for acquiring, curating and disseminating data and information, but also on protocols, policies and procedures in the science system that provide the structure and support to ensure that science objectives are achieved….”

PLUTO Decentralized Communication Platform: White Paper

“PLUTO, just as all the academics around the world would do, craves to solve these absurdities, by creating a fair, transparent, reasonable, and efficient communication platform for scholars, decentralized from the present too much power of publishers. Using blockchain technology, PLUTO decentralizes the way academics share, evaluate, and reuse their research outputs. The scope of these outputs is extended beyond the present narrow definition confined to published papers to a broader sense of various information occurring midresearch. The values arising in the cycle of the system, both in financial and reputational terms, are credited rightfully to the ones who contribute to them. The reputational compensations, in the long-term, will work as an alternative metric for academics. By creating a decentralized, transparent, and reasonable system of records for academic activities, PLUTO makes the global scholarly communication efficient than ever. The whole cost savings will be greater than 80 billion USD throughout entire research industry. Besides being efficient, the paradigm of scholarly communication shifts with PLUTO. As all kinds of mid-research outputs are empowered and promoted to be shared, the lifetime value of researches will be fully utilized, making the number of digits for current global R&D industry at more than 2 trillion USD outdated. Along with the practice of validating researches, the alternative, objective performance indicator for researches, and a new system for allocating resources, there will be extraordinary advances in current challenges like incurable diseases or sustainable energy. Ultimately, the decentralized academia initiated by PLUTO will advance the way the knowledge of humanity itself advances. …”