2019 Big Deals Survey Report: An Updated Mapping of Major Scholarly Publishing Contracts in Europe

“The Second EUA Big Deals Survey Report is an updated mapping of major scholarly publishing contracts in Europe.

Conducted in 2017-2018, the report gathers data from 31 consortia covering an unprecedented 167 contracts with five major publishers: Elsevier, Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis, Wiley and American Chemical Society. Readers will discover that the total costs reported by the participating consortia exceed one billion euros for periodicals, databases, e-books and other resources – mainly to the benefit of large, commercial scholarly publishers.

The report provides an overview of Big Deal negotiations across Europe, focusing on topics such as the organisation of negotiations, provisions on Open Access and transparency of contracts and costs. It also offers information on the consortia and focuses specifically on periodical Big Deal contracts with the five large publishers selected for this survey. Finally, the report addresses the costs of Big Deal contracts, offering conclusions and policy recommendations on the negotiation of contracts….”

Reflections on trends in library big deals, consortiums and how it might apply to Singapore? | Musings about librarianship

The news that University of California system cancelled their deal with Elsevier seemed to have caused a bit of a stir all over the world, including here in Singapore and I was asked to do a talk to brief faculty on the latest trends in this area.

The more I researched the more interested I got. What were institutions and consortiums doing to better their bargaining position with the big publishers?  Was it all about reducing costs for the “big deals”? How successfully were they?  Lastly to really negotiate with any credibility, you had to be prepared to walk away from the bargaining table and cancel and indeed some consortiums and institutions have done so, how were their users coping?…”

Revisiting – Navigating the Big Deal: A Guide for Societies – The Scholarly Kitchen

“In the wake of Plan S, many research society and independent publishers are exploring potential partnerships with larger publishing houses. While Plan S is the catalyst for this activity, it’s part of a longer term trend in the market toward scale as the key advantage leading to success. The benefit for a smaller publisher in such an arrangement is that they gain access to that scale, along with the resources that come with it. The negatives include losing some levels of control over one’s publication program. In particular, as the Big Deal has evolved, it has changed the way these partnerships can work. Because so much effort is currently going into expanding the Big Deal into The Bigger Deal (adding in open access author fees on top of subscription access), I thought it was a good time to revisit Michael Clarke’s post from last year that talked about understanding the current state of the Big Deal and the careful planning one needs to do in order to put together a successful publishing partnership….”

Revisiting – Navigating the Big Deal: A Guide for Societies – The Scholarly Kitchen

“In the wake of Plan S, many research society and independent publishers are exploring potential partnerships with larger publishing houses. While Plan S is the catalyst for this activity, it’s part of a longer term trend in the market toward scale as the key advantage leading to success. The benefit for a smaller publisher in such an arrangement is that they gain access to that scale, along with the resources that come with it. The negatives include losing some levels of control over one’s publication program. In particular, as the Big Deal has evolved, it has changed the way these partnerships can work. Because so much effort is currently going into expanding the Big Deal into The Bigger Deal (adding in open access author fees on top of subscription access), I thought it was a good time to revisit Michael Clarke’s post from last year that talked about understanding the current state of the Big Deal and the careful planning one needs to do in order to put together a successful publishing partnership….”

Welcome to “No Big Deal?”: News and Links About the Cost, Value, and Sustainability of Big Journal Bundles

Today we are launching No Big Deal?, a new feature of UVA Library News that will track the latest events and scholarship about the biggest vendors serving research libraries like ours. Tracking, shaping, and responding to this landscape has always been part of what the Library does, and we would like to share some of what we are seeing, doing, and thinking with you, the faculty, students, and researchers who use our collections.

Big changes are shaking up the way research libraries around the world think about the biggest line items in our budgets, the journal bundles we call “Big Deals.” In particular, we’re following stories about libraries pushing back and even walking away completely from unsustainable deals. Increasingly bold initiatives abroad, from research funders and national-level university groups like those in GermanySwedenNorway, and France, also merit attention. Global efforts to expand open access and contain subscription costs are sure to affect the ecosystem in the US….”

Statement from Deans and Directors of Virginia Research Libraries on the University of California System’s Termination of Contract with Elsevier | UVA Library News and Announcements

As Deans and Directors of Virginia research libraries, our core mission and our highest priority is to ensure that our research communities have access to a rich, diverse, and sustainable collection of information resources. Recently, our colleagues in the University of California system took an important stand in defense of that mission by refusing to renew their $50 million “Big Deal” contract with Elsevier, the world’s most profitable vendor of information products. We write to express our gratitude and our support for them and the brave step they have taken, the latest in a global trend of libraries rethinking their biggest expenditures….”

Deal or No Deal | Periodicals Price Survey 2019

“Pressure increases on publishers to move more quickly to open access, but this leaves many questions unanswered

For the past decade, libraries have battled declining university budgets and increasing serials expenditures. With each Big Deal package renewal or cancellation, librarians and publishers have asked themselves: Did I make the best deal? Did I make the right deal? Recent developments in open access (OA) promise to bring major reform to academic publishing and, with that, new challenges and opportunities to the way that librarians and publishers choose to deal….”

Elsevier’s Presence on Campuses Spans More Than Journals. That Has Some Scholars Worried. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Lyon, a librarian of scholarly communications at the University of Texas at Austin, listed scholarly-publishing tools that had been acquired by the journal publishing giant Elsevier. In 2013, the company bought Mendeley, a free reference manager. It acquired the Social Science Research Network, an e-library with more than 850,000 papers, in 2016. And it acquired the online tools Pure and Bepress — which visualize research — in 2012 and 2017, respectively.

Lyon said she started considering institutions’ dependence on Elsevier when the company acquired Bepress two years ago. She was shocked, she recalled in a recent interview.

“It just got me thinking,” she said. Elsevier had it all: Institutional repositories, preprints of journal articles, and analytics. “Elsevier, Elsevier, Elsevier, Elsevier, Elsevier.”

Scholars are beginning to discuss the idea of Elsevier-as-monolith at conferences and in their research. Not only are librarians and researchers speaking openly about the hefty costs of bulk subscriptions to the company’s premier journals, but they’re also paying attention to the products that Elsevier has acquired, several of which allow its customers to store data and share their work….”

No Big Deal | Library Babel Fish

“While our system is dandy for finding things we’re not allowed to share, it’s not always great at discovering open access materials. Quite often, an open access publication listed in a database or a book in the catalog will fail to link to the item, and that confuses students. The behind-the-scenes work that has to go into making things connect from one database to another or from a catalog to an electronic source is complex, and it may seem silly to worry about cataloging something that can be found with a Google search – but if our shared catalogs lead to things we can’t borrow but fail to find open access books, we’re really dropping the ball….”

After the Elsevier ‘Tipping Point,’ Research Libraries Consider Their Options – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Research librarians are giving notice: The pressures that led the University of California system to cut the cord with Elsevier aren’t foreign to their campuses….

2016 survey by the Association of College and Research Libraries showed that 60 percent of libraries had reported flat budgets for the previous five years, and 19 percent had seen decreased funding….”