Latin America’s longstanding Open Access ecosystem could be undermined by proposals from the Global North | LSE Latin America and Caribbean

“Open access is often seen as a process of switching from the existing closed-subscription model of scholarly communication to an open one. But Latin America has had an open access ecosystem for scholarly publishing for over a decade, and the recent AmeliCA initiative seeks to develop cooperative scientific communication further still. These efforts, however, could yet be undermined by recent open access proposals from the cOAlition S consortium of research funders in the Global North, write Eduardo Aguado López and Arianna Becerril García (both Redalyc, AmeliCA, and Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México)….”

Open and Shut?: The OA interviews: Arianna Becerril-García, Chair of AmeliCA

“A professor in the School of Political and Social Sciences at the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico (UAEM), Arianna Becerril-García is also the Executive Director of Redalyc, the Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America and the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal. Redalyc is a regional open access portal for the social sciences and humanities that indexes 1,305 local journals and hosts the full texts of more than 650,000 articles. …

In addition, Becerril-García is the Chair of a new project called AmeliCA (Open Knowledge for Latin America and the Global South). AmeliCA’s goal is to propagate the Redalyc model to the more than 15,000 journals in the region and elsewhere in the Global South.

As Chair of AmeliCA, Becerril-García has become a vocal critic of Plan S – the European OA initiative announced last year by a group of funders that call themselves cOAlition S. While AmeliCA shares cOAlition S’s goal of achieving universal open access, says Becerril-García, it fears that, as currently conceived, Plan S would disenfranchise researchers in the Global South and exclude them further from the international scholarly publishing system….”

Plan S and Open Access in Latin America: Interview with Dominique Babini

“Open Access publishing is more widespread in Latin America than in any other region of the world, and continues to grow. We sat down with CLACSO’s Open Access Advisor Dominique Babini to find out why….”

AmeliCA – Conocimiento abierto para América Latina y el sur Global

From Google’s English: “Ameli, Open Knowledge for Latin America and the Global South (AmeliCA) is an initiative launched by various institutions with a common agenda. It is a new configuration of strategies, in response to the international, regional, national and institutional context, which seeks a collaborative, sustainable, protected and non-commercial Open Access solution for Latin America and the Global South….”

Open Access Indicators in Subject Digital Repositories. The Case of CLACSO´s Latin America and the Caribbean Social Sciences Digital Repository Indicators. – E-LIS repository

Abstract:  Since the beginning of the Repository, CLACSO defined that the monitoring and evaluation of the Repository would be made from three perspectives:

 – Community: The extent to which CLACSO manages to promote open access, including the publishers and libraries of in its network and virtual community, and regularly expose them to the trends of academic communications in open access, contributing to a cultural change in the Region and the adoption of open access for the dissemination of research results.

 – Collections: How the digital collections of the Member Centers and programs of CLACSO´s Digital Repository – including the collection of CLACSO journals in Redalyc – grow, taking care of geographical and institutional diversity, and performing specific actions to promote participation with contents in open access digital repositories from the Region. 

 – Use: How the Repository and its digital collections are used: number of downloads, countries of origin of requests, most requested digital objects, subjects most consulted. Starting in 2014, metrics at article level is experimented with some collections.

 CLACSO’s Digital Repository website offers, in open access, the statistical reports as they develop. These reports allow the tracking of the above-mentioned three variables of community, collection, and use of the Repository.