Wide Open School organizes free educational resources to help parents and teachers homeschool | TechCrunch

“Nearly 300 million kids are missing school worldwide because of the coronavirus outbreak, including some 54 million in the U.S. alone. That’s left parents scrambling for resources to help continue their children’s education, often while also working from home themselves — an almost insurmountable challenge. Today, the nonprofit media organization Common Sense is launching a site to help parents. Called Wide Open School (WideOpenSchool.org), it combines in one place the best educational resources for publishers, nonprofits and education companies.

At launch, this free resource includes content from the American Federation of Teachers, Amplify, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Head Start, Khan Academy, National Geographic, Noggin, PBS, Scholastic, Sesame Workshop, Time for Kids, XQ Institute and even YouTube….”

Wide Open School organizes free educational resources to help parents and teachers homeschool | TechCrunch

“Nearly 300 million kids are missing school worldwide because of the coronavirus outbreak, including some 54 million in the U.S. alone. That’s left parents scrambling for resources to help continue their children’s education, often while also working from home themselves — an almost insurmountable challenge. Today, the nonprofit media organization Common Sense is launching a site to help parents. Called Wide Open School (WideOpenSchool.org), it combines in one place the best educational resources for publishers, nonprofits and education companies.

At launch, this free resource includes content from the American Federation of Teachers, Amplify, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Head Start, Khan Academy, National Geographic, Noggin, PBS, Scholastic, Sesame Workshop, Time for Kids, XQ Institute and even YouTube….”

Proposed Priorities, Requirement, and Definitions-Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education-Open Textbooks Pilot Program

“The Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education proposes priorities, requirement, and definitions for the Open Textbooks Pilot program conducted under the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number 84.116T. The Assistant Secretary may use one or more of these priorities, requirement, and definitions for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2020 and later years. We intend this action to further develop and identify programs and practices that improve instruction and student learning outcomes, as well as increase access, affordability, and completion rates of students seeking postsecondary education degrees or other recognized credentials as a result of the development, enhancement, and use of open textbooks (as defined in this notice)….”

Proposed Priorities, Requirement, and Definitions-Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education-Open Textbooks Pilot Program

“The Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education proposes priorities, requirement, and definitions for the Open Textbooks Pilot program conducted under the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number 84.116T. The Assistant Secretary may use one or more of these priorities, requirement, and definitions for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2020 and later years. We intend this action to further develop and identify programs and practices that improve instruction and student learning outcomes, as well as increase access, affordability, and completion rates of students seeking postsecondary education degrees or other recognized credentials as a result of the development, enhancement, and use of open textbooks (as defined in this notice)….”

Corporate Resources for Higher Ed Going Online During COVID-19 – Google Sheets

“The following is a list of free, discounted, or expanded products and services being offered during the COVID-19 outbreak from external organizations. Inclusion on this list does not signify endorsement or verification by EDUCAUSE. EDUCAUSE does not profit in any way from these offerings. EDUCAUSE will endeavor to keep the list updated, however, due to the volume of requests and timeframes of offers, the list may become outdated. Institutions should contact organizations listed for current status….”

Reading Aloud: Fair Use Enables Translating Classroom Practices to Online Learning – Google Docs

“In recent days, as many teachers have faced an abrupt shift to online teaching, there have been questions about how copyright law applies to the translation of classroom-based practices of reading aloud to students to the digital environment.  While many well-intentioned commentators have warned teachers against this practice, the fact is that copyright law — specifically fair use — permits many read-aloud activities online. As instructors and learners adapt to new educational environments, copyright concerns about reading aloud need not be among the challenges they face.

 

Reading aloud engages communities in critical thinking and community-building activities that are key to learning and development.  It is exactly this special utility of reading aloud in education that is the key to understanding why fair use applies to it so broadly and robustly.

 
As we explain below, fair use is a limit on copyright law that allows you to use a copyrighted work for a new transformative purpose that doesn’t harm the core market for the original. …”

 

Copyright Considerations for the Harvard Community in Shifting Courses from In-Person to Online During the COVID-19 Crisis – Research Guides at Harvard Library

“Harvard Library staff are working hard to support instructors’ needs for resources and information as they rapidly shift to an online teaching environment. Information presented here is meant to proactively address questions concerning copyright and teaching online. 

Many pedagogical and technical issues make the shift from in-person to online teaching challenging, yet copyright is not an additional area of great concern. Many of the legal issues are the same in both contexts. 

If it was okay to do in class, it is often okay to do in a fully online classroom environment, especially when your online access is limited to the same enrolled students.
In particular, please always take accessibility needs into account. Copyright law does not preclude creating transcripts or captions for course videos and audio. In fact, it normally allows for it….”