Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL): Open Educational Resources (OER) White Paper

In response to increasing membership interest in Open Educational Resources (OER) and the library’s role in this endeavour, from September 2016 until November 2017, OCUL undertook an environmental scan and analysis of current activities in the realm of open education publishing. This research resulted in the creation of the Open Educational Resources White Paper, which was approved for distribution in November 2017.

The scope of this report focused on the following topics:

  • Overview of the current teaching and learning environment
    • Faculty perspective
    • Student perspective
  • Environmental scan of national and international OER initiatives across libraries
  • Legal considerations and licensing for producing and repurposing existing works
  • Accessibility implications
  • Technology and tools in use
  • Current opportunities and the next frontier

Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL): Open Educational Resources (OER) White Paper

In response to increasing membership interest in Open Educational Resources (OER) and the library’s role in this endeavour, from September 2016 until November 2017, OCUL undertook an environmental scan and analysis of current activities in the realm of open education publishing. This research resulted in the creation of the Open Educational Resources White Paper, which was approved for distribution in November 2017.

The scope of this report focused on the following topics:

  • Overview of the current teaching and learning environment
    • Faculty perspective
    • Student perspective
  • Environmental scan of national and international OER initiatives across libraries
  • Legal considerations and licensing for producing and repurposing existing works
  • Accessibility implications
  • Technology and tools in use
  • Current opportunities and the next frontier

Harvard DART – Digital Assets for Reuse in Teaching

“Since 2012, HarvardX has developed over 35,000 learning assets for the edX platform, yet the use of these resources on-campus has been limited to small specialized experiments. A contributing factor to this limited use is that edX educational assets are only accessible behind the firewall of an edX registration page. MOOC learners, course staff, and faculty leads must all register for a course in order to even simply browse resources. Allen & Seaman (2016) indicate that two of the most cited obstacles to adoption of open educational resources by university faculty in the U.S. are the difficulty of finding high quality resources and the lack of comprehensive catalogue of resources….”

Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D)

“The Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project aims to provide evidence-based research from a number of countries in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. The primary objective of the programme is to improve educational policy, practice, and research in developing countries by better understanding the use and impact of OER….”

Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D)

“The Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project aims to provide evidence-based research from a number of countries in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. The primary objective of the programme is to improve educational policy, practice, and research in developing countries by better understanding the use and impact of OER….”

Open Textbook Library

“Open textbooks are textbooks that have been funded, published, and licensed to be freely used, adapted, and distributed. These books have been reviewed by faculty from a variety of colleges and universities to assess their quality. These books can be downloaded for no cost, or printed at low cost. All textbooks are either used at multiple higher education institutions; or affiliated with an institution, scholarly society, or professional organization.

The Open Textbook Library is supported by the Center for Open Education and the Open Textbook Network….”

‘Inclusive access’ takes off as model for college textbook sales

Major education publishers — including Pearson, Cengage and McGraw-Hill Education — report that the number of colleges offering “inclusive-access” programs has grown rapidly in recent years. Where previously students might have been assigned textbooks individually, now many institutions are signing up whole classes of students to automatically receive digital course materials at a discounted rate, rather than purchasing individually. The “inclusive” aspect of the model means that every student has the same materials on the first day of class, with the charge included as part of their tuition. For publishers with struggling print businesses, the inclusive-access model is a lifeline. Tim Peyton, vice president of strategic partnerships at Pearson, said it was no secret that publishers like Pearson had made textbooks too expensive and had seen sales drop as a result. “The print model is really a broken business model for us,” he said, adding, “we’re thinking about how to move away from print, and move towards digital.”

What is the Paris OER Declaration? | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

“The World OER Congress held at UNESCO, Paris on 20-22 June 2012,…Recommends that States, within their capacities and authority: …Promote and use OER to widen access to education at all levels, both formal and non-formal….Promote the development of specific policies for the production and use of OER within wider strategies for advancing education….Facilitate the re-use, revision, remixing and redistribution of educational materials across the world through open licensing….”

Foundations for OER Strategy Development

“The purpose of this document is to provide a concise analysis of where the global OER movement currently stands: what the common threads are, where the greatest opportunities and challenges lie, and how we can more effectively work together as a community. The first draft was born from a meeting of 26 OER leaders in February 2015. We then shared this document on global and regional OER lists and had in-person discussions with members of the international OER community at the 2015 Hewlett OER grantees meeting, OER15, Open Ed Global 2015, and the CC Global Summit 2015. Comments from all four meetings were integrated into this document.

Our hope is that this document will serve as a starting point for conversations about strategies for mainstreaming OER and extending its reach and impact globally. We also hope that this document, and the strategies within, will evolve as the conversation evolves to provide useful insight for both global coordination and local action….”