Long version: Call for Proposals – Google Docs

“We’re excited to invite chapter proposal submissions for a forthcoming openly published book, tentatively titled Open Pedagogy: Varied Definitions, Multiple Approaches. The book, which will examine library/faculty collaborative explorations into open pedagogical practices, will be published through the Rebus Community, a Montreal-based non-profit that is developing an open model for publishing….”

OE [Open Education] Day at UTA [U of Texas at Arlington]

Abstract:  We’ll define open educational resources (OER), examine the impact of OER use in higher education, discuss copyright and open licensing, and explore avenues for identifying existing OER that can be remixed and reused. The presentation will cover updates on federal and state OER initiatives and highlight support for open educational practices at UTA, including access to and technical support for Pressbooks, a web-based publishing platform.

Do open educational resources improve student learning? Implications of the access hypothesis

Abstract:  Open Educational Resources (OER) have been lauded for their ability to reduce student costs and improve equity in higher education. Research examining whether OER provides learning benefits have produced mixed results, with most studies showing null effects. We argue that the common methods used to examine OER efficacy are unlikely to detect positive effects based on predictions of the access hypothesis. The access hypothesis states that OER benefits learning by providing access to critical course materials, and therefore predicts that OER should only benefit students who would not otherwise have access to the materials. Through the use of simulation analysis, we demonstrate that even if there is a learning benefit of OER, standard research methods are unlikely to detect it.

Do open educational resources improve student learning? Implications of the access hypothesis

Abstract:  Open Educational Resources (OER) have been lauded for their ability to reduce student costs and improve equity in higher education. Research examining whether OER provides learning benefits have produced mixed results, with most studies showing null effects. We argue that the common methods used to examine OER efficacy are unlikely to detect positive effects based on predictions of the access hypothesis. The access hypothesis states that OER benefits learning by providing access to critical course materials, and therefore predicts that OER should only benefit students who would not otherwise have access to the materials. Through the use of simulation analysis, we demonstrate that even if there is a learning benefit of OER, standard research methods are unlikely to detect it.

Do open educational resources improve student learning?

Open educational resources (OER), such as free textbooks, have grown in popularity in recent years as institutions and faculty work to lower costs for students, but researchers have had difficulty determining if adopting OER impacts learning. A new study by Rice University researchers suggests previous OER research may have failed to turn up significant results because it has been looking at too wide a pool of students.

Because OER will likely provide tangible learning benefits only to students who otherwise would go without a textbook, research needs to hone in on those students, the Rice study determined….”

Do open educational resources improve student learning?

Open educational resources (OER), such as free textbooks, have grown in popularity in recent years as institutions and faculty work to lower costs for students, but researchers have had difficulty determining if adopting OER impacts learning. A new study by Rice University researchers suggests previous OER research may have failed to turn up significant results because it has been looking at too wide a pool of students.

Because OER will likely provide tangible learning benefits only to students who otherwise would go without a textbook, research needs to hone in on those students, the Rice study determined….”

Student Savings at Scale: LibreTexts – SPARC

LibreTexts offers materials in 12 widely used college-level disciplines from chemistry to humanities. It has 398 textbooks (68,500 pages) in its free online library and covers 154 courses. Since it was established 11 years ago, LibreTexts has been used by 223 million students saving them approximately $31 million….”

Much Ado About MOOCs: Where Are We in the Evolution of Online Courses? | EdSurge News

A lot has changed since 2012 or, the year the New York Times dubbed the “Year of the MOOC.” The premise back then was that classes would make high-quality online education accessible for all—and for free. Today, many MOOC providers now charge a fee. They’ve rolled out bundles of courses called ‘Specializations’ or ‘Nanodegrees.’ And popular providers like Coursera and edX are increasingly partnering with colleges and universities to offer MOOC-based degrees online.

So, seven years after the “Year of the MOOC,” we’re wondering: Where are these courses and companies today? And how are universities responding?…

Last year, the number of learners who had taken at least one MOOC crossed 100 million, but the number of learners added was just 20 million, which was less than 23 million for the last two years. So the rate at which new users are coming into the MOOC space is decreasing.

The number of courses has been growing steadily at the same rate now. We have more than 11,000 courses from 900 universities. As for the MOOC providers, Coursera is the biggest one—with the most revenue and the most number of users, and also the most number of employees. Udacity ended 2017 with 500 employees, but they had layoffs, and ended 2018 with 330 employees….”