Green OA: publishers and journals allowing zero embargo and CC-BY | Innovations in Scholarly Communication

“On July 15 2020, cOAlition S announced their Rights Retention Strategy, providing authors with the right to share the accepted manuscript (AAM) of their research articles with an open license and without embargo, as one of the ways to comply with Plan S requirements. This raises the question to what extent immediate and open licensed self archiving of scholarly publications is currently already possible and practiced. Here we provide the results of some analyses carried out earlier this year, intended to at least partially answer that question. We limit this brief study to journal articles and only looked at CC-BY licenses (not CC0, CC-BY-SA and CC-BY-ND, which can also meet Plan S requirements)….

Our main conclusions are that:

Based on stated policies we found very few (18) journals that currently allow the combination of immediate and CC-BY-licensed self archiving.
Based on stated policies of 36 large publishers, there are currently ~2800 journals with those publishers that allow immediate green, but all disallow or do not explicitly allow CC-BY….”

Intellectual property rights retention in scholarly works at Australian universities

“Rights retention in scholarly works can include a spectrum of copyright arrangements, reuse rights, and machine readability4 . Copyright retention by authors or universities for scholarly works is becoming preferred by some funders and advocates. Ideally, these changes would take place on the national level. However, recommendations for legislative or national policy change are outside the scope of this report as they require extensive consultation with stakeholders and government. This briefing report has therefore focused on the potential to achieve reuse rights retention in institutional IP policies only….”

Open-access Plan S to allow publishing in any journal

“Funding agencies behind the radical open-access (OA) initiative Plan S have announced a policy that could make it possible for researchers to bypass journals’ restrictions on open publishing. The change could allow scientists affected by Plan S to publish in any journal they want — even in subscription titles, such as Science, that haven’t yet agreed to comply with the scheme.

Plan S, which kicks in from 2021, aims to make scientific and scholarly works free to read and reproduce as soon as they are published. Research funders that have signed up to it include the World Health Organization, Wellcome in London, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, Washington, and 17 national funders, mostly in Europe. The European Commission also says it will follow the plan.

Under the initiative, scientists funded by Plan S agencies must publish their work OA. If a journal doesn’t allow that, researchers can instead post an accepted version of their article — an author accepted manuscript, or AAM — in an online repository as soon as their paper appears. This kind of author-initiated sharing is sometimes called green open access. Under Plan S, it comes with a key condition that has so far been anathema to many subscription journals: the AAM must be shared under a liberal ‘CC-BY’ publishing licence that would allow others to republish and translate the work….”

 

Implementation Roadmap of cOAlition S Organisations | Plan S

“The following table shows for each cOAlition S Organisation:

The date their Plan S-aligned Open Access policy will apply from
What their Plan S-aligned Open Access policy will apply to

It also shows which funders are adopting the Rights Retention Strategy to support the implementation of their Plan S-aligned OA policy from 1/1/2021. These funders are designated as “early adopters”. Other funders, who plan to update their grant conditions at a later date, are categorised as “adoption to follow”. …”

ARL Welcomes cOAlitionS Rights Retention Strategy Calling for Open Access to Results of Funded Research – Association of Research Libraries

“The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) commends cOAlitionS on today’s announcement of its Rights Retention Strategy to advance the goal of immediate open access to the published results of funded research. With this announcement, cOAlitionS has provided a pathway to implementing the first principle of PlanS, that authors or their institutions retain copyright to their publications, and make them available under an open license. While author rights retention and open licensing have been a bedrock principle for open access advocates for nearly two decades, many authors are reluctant to challenge journal publishers who require the transfer of copyright as a condition of publication. Similarly, cOAlitionS (and many other funding agencies) have been reluctant to tell authors where to publish their work.

Under this new strategy, cOAlitionS resolves this conflict by assigning, as a condition of their grants, a default CC-BY license to all Author Accepted Manuscripts (AAM) reporting on original research supported in whole or in part by their funding. Grantees are asked to inform publishers of this requirement and open license upon submission, and then upon publication to make that manuscript (or, if possible, the Version of Record), immediately available in an open access repository. Research libraries either maintain such open repositories for their institutions or have the expertise and services to consult with researchers on where and how to deposit their work openly….”

cOAlition S develops “Rights Retention Strategy” to safeguard researchers’ intellectual ownership rights and suppress unreasonable embargo periods | Plan S

Publishers commonly require authors to sign exclusive publishing agreements which restrict what authors can do with their research findings, including making articles Open Access in line with their funders’ requirements. To address this problem, cOAlition S has developed a Rights Retention Strategy, which will empower their funded researchers to publish in their journal of choice, including subscription journals, and provide Open Access in compliance with Plan S.

One of the three Plan S routes to achieve full and immediate Open Access is via repositories, where, as a minimum, the Author Accepted Manuscript (AAM) is made openly available under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence or equivalent, without any embargo.

The Rights Retention Strategy is designed to ensure that all cOAlition S funded scholarly publications are available as Open Access. In practical terms, it enables researchers to retain sufficient intellectual ownership rights in their work to make the AAM Open Access at the time of publication with a CC BY license….”

cOAlition S develops “Rights Retention Strategy” to safeguard researchers’ intellectual ownership rights and suppress unreasonable embargo periods | Plan S

Publishers commonly require authors to sign exclusive publishing agreements which restrict what authors can do with their research findings, including making articles Open Access in line with their funders’ requirements. To address this problem, cOAlition S has developed a Rights Retention Strategy, which will empower their funded researchers to publish in their journal of choice, including subscription journals, and provide Open Access in compliance with Plan S.

One of the three Plan S routes to achieve full and immediate Open Access is via repositories, where, as a minimum, the Author Accepted Manuscript (AAM) is made openly available under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence or equivalent, without any embargo.

The Rights Retention Strategy is designed to ensure that all cOAlition S funded scholarly publications are available as Open Access. In practical terms, it enables researchers to retain sufficient intellectual ownership rights in their work to make the AAM Open Access at the time of publication with a CC BY license….”

Marie Curie Alumni Association welcomes rights retention for researchers | Zenodo

“The Marie Curie Alumni Association is a strong supporter of open science and for the empowerment of researchers, for example as described in our February 2020 statement ‘Researchers call on EU institutions to ensure free circulation of scientific knowledge’, our December 2019 statement ‘Researchers support sharing of peer-reviewed research without embargoes and restrictions’, our September 2018 ‘Joint Statement on Open Access for Researchers via Plan S’ and our May 2019 input to the ‘Stakeholder consultation on the future of scholarly publishing and scholarly communication’.

Our previous efforts and positions align well with today’s announcement from cOAlition S on a new ‘Rights Retention Strategy’, which we therefore warmly welcome. 

Researchers should never be forced by a publisher to hand over the rights to their work, and we reiterate our previous call upon those publishers that still force barriers on the flow of knowledge, to modernize and join the numerous publishers that already today allow and encourage researchers to share their research findings without embargoes and restrictions.

As a contributor to the cOAlition S taskforce on ‘Monitoring the effects of Plan S on Research and Scholarly Communication’, the Marie Curie Alumni Association commits to remain a constructive partner and positive force in the important endeavour of advancing open science while empowering researchers….”

Marie Curie Alumni Association welcomes rights retention for researchers | Zenodo

“The Marie Curie Alumni Association is a strong supporter of open science and for the empowerment of researchers, for example as described in our February 2020 statement ‘Researchers call on EU institutions to ensure free circulation of scientific knowledge’, our December 2019 statement ‘Researchers support sharing of peer-reviewed research without embargoes and restrictions’, our September 2018 ‘Joint Statement on Open Access for Researchers via Plan S’ and our May 2019 input to the ‘Stakeholder consultation on the future of scholarly publishing and scholarly communication’.

Our previous efforts and positions align well with today’s announcement from cOAlition S on a new ‘Rights Retention Strategy’, which we therefore warmly welcome. 

Researchers should never be forced by a publisher to hand over the rights to their work, and we reiterate our previous call upon those publishers that still force barriers on the flow of knowledge, to modernize and join the numerous publishers that already today allow and encourage researchers to share their research findings without embargoes and restrictions.

As a contributor to the cOAlition S taskforce on ‘Monitoring the effects of Plan S on Research and Scholarly Communication’, the Marie Curie Alumni Association commits to remain a constructive partner and positive force in the important endeavour of advancing open science while empowering researchers….”