Finding Open Access Scholarly Research | HR Hub

“Are you part of a non-profit organization, but don’t have access to University research and resources? This workshop will focus on ways non-University affiliated community researchers can still access excellent scholarly articles & research, so you don’t have to beg, steal, or borrow to get the evidence you need. Beyond the paywall is freedom! All Are Welcome! We’ll cover: What is Open Access, and can you trust it? Places to find high quality, legal, scholarly research – beyond Google Simple search strategies to get better results Resources for grant writing…”

Making Your Research Freely-Available with MarXiv: The (free!) preprint service for ocean-conservation and marine-climate science | OpenChannels: Sustainable Ocean Management and Conservation

“Event Date:  Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 1pm EST / 10am PST / 6pm UTC This webinar will be presented by Nick Wehner, Project Director of MarXiv and Director of Open Initiatives at OCTO. Ocean managers, policymakers, and NGOs routinely face barriers to scientific knowledge: they simply can’t afford costly subscriptions to traditional peer-reviewed academic journals. Studies have found that these financial barriers result in less primary science being used in on-the-ground environmental management plans.”

More disasters predicted as analysis exposes “widening construction knowledge gap”

“An unprecedented study of 6 million pieces of data claims to shows that the knowledge framework underpinning UK construction is not fit for purpose.

As the industry reels from the deadly Grenfell Tower fire, the study’s authors warn that practitioners do not have ready access to critical knowledge and that more mistakes are “inevitable”.

Designing Buildings Wiki, an open knowledge base, says it has undertaken the first comprehensive mapping of construction industry knowledge.

It published what it calls the “startling results” in a report this week, which found that:

Too much essential knowledge is difficult to understand, buried in long documents or locked behind pay walls and will not be used.

Practitioners need accessible, practical, easy-to-use guidance to help them carry out everyday activities.

The industry lacks the strategic leadership needed to coordinate the creation and dissemination of knowledge.

The internet has fundamentally changed the way practitioners access knowledge, but the industry has not kept up….”

Preliminary Findings: Rent Seeking by Elsevier – The Knowledge G.A.P.

Over the last few decades, there has been ongoing debate and distress regarding the effects of the journal subscription paywall and the very real barriers to knowledge access that it creates. As major academic publishers invest and redirect their business strategies to open access and alternative paying structures, it may seem as if the access to knowledge battle is starting to be won. However, as big publishers move towards openness they have also been redirecting their business strategies towards the acquisition of scholarly infrastructure, the tools and services that underpin the scholarly research life cycle, many of which are geared towards data analytics. We argue that moves toward increased control over openness and data analytics by big publishers are simultaneous processes of profit maximization. Could it be that our attention on the paywall has ditracted us from paying attention to the strategic takeover of infrastructure by the publishers? These processes should be examined closely as they are actively entrenching the publisher’s’ power and control which could be posing great threats to the exclusion of already marginalized researchers and institutions.   

Libraries, Universities Unite to Push for Open Access – ECS

Over the summer, librarians and academic leaders in Germany came together to lead a push in taking down the paywalls that block access to so many scientific research articles. The initiative, named Projekt DEAL, represents a bold push toward open access that could change the landscape of academic publishing.

The latest developments in Projekt DEAL pick up on a battle now over two years in the making, where libraries and universities in Germany have united in pushing large publishers to adopt a new business model. The institutions are looking to forego the typical subscription-based academic publishing business model in lieu of paying an annual lump sum that covers publications costs of all papers whose first authors are associated with German institutions.”

Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research

Abstract:  The open access movement seeks to encourage all researchers to make their works openly available and free of paywalls so more people can access their knowledge. Yet some researchers who study open access (OA) continue to publish their work in paywalled journals and fail to make it open. This project set out to study just how many published research articles about OA fall into this category, how many are being made open (whether by being published in a gold OA or hybrid journal or through open deposit), and how library and information science authors compare to other disciplines researching this field. Because of the growth of tools available to help researchers find open versions of articles, this study also sought to compare how these new tools compare to Google Scholar in their ability to disseminating OA research. From a sample collected from Web of Science of articles published since 2010, the study found that although a majority of research articles about OA are open in some form, a little more than a quarter are not. A smaller rate of library science researchers made their work open compared to non-library science researchers. In looking at the copyright of these articles published in hybrid and open journals, authors were more likely to retain copyright ownership if they printed in an open journal compared to authors in hybrid journals. Articles were more likely to be published with a Creative Commons license if published in an open journal compared to those published in hybrid journals.

Help request paywalled articles about Open Access be made accessible

“We can request this research through the Open Access Button. Teresa and I both requested 20 each. We’d love for you to help us request the rest. It’s easy and you can help make more research accessible to all whether you have time to make 1 or 50 requests!

1: Create an Open Access Button account.  All that is needed is your email (to notify you when the request is fulfilled), but you can also provide your name, position, and/or affiliation (authors are more likely to help actual people).

2. Search  Grab the DOI or title from this spreadsheet and paste it into the search box on the Open Access Button site.

3. Share a story and submit Tell the Button how getting access to the research will help you?—?this will be shared with the author and can be critical in convincing them to archive their research. You can either use the story below that Teresa and I have used, or create your own.

I’m really excited about your research related to Open Access. Unfortunately, it is not accessible to all. Librarians, open access advocates, and researchers could benefit from your article if you make it openly available. Please archive it, so we can all learn from your research!

4. Update the spreadsheet After you submit your request, copy the url and paste it in the “OAB Request Link” field on the spreadsheet.

That’s it! You’re a star!

The Open Access Button’s request system will email the author and request they archive the article to make it accessible to everyone. Thanks for helping make more research open!”