Preprints in perioperative medicine: immediacy for the greater good – British Journal of Anaesthesia

Abstract:  Medical and scientific journals spread developing knowledge by facilitating communication between physicians and scientists. Authors, readers, and the public rightfully expect rapid publication of rigorously reviewed high-quality papers. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of rapid dissemination and has put unprecedented demands on journals. There is genuine urgency to complete medical research and place the findings expeditiously into the public domain after expert peer review so that new findings can be used to improve patient care as soon as possible. The process of peer review is often a slow process, but is essential to ensure that changes in patient care are informed by careful and definitive research. Thus, journal editors must balance the potentially competing goals of immediacy and quality control.

 

Access to biodiversity for food production: Reconciling open access digital sequence information with access and benefit sharing: Molecular Plant

“Over the last 40 years or so, a complex web of international legal agreements was developed that regulate the access, transfer, and use of plant genetic resources. These include the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Nagoya Protocol, and the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources (Figure 1). In developing these legal regimes, policy makers struggled to balance a number of conflicting demands. These included ensuring that access providers share in the benefits that arise from the use of their genetic resources; that users who value-add to genetic resources can protect their innovations via intellectual property; and, at the same time, that scientists and breeders have ongoing access to genetic resources. While there are problems with the existing regimes, they have reached an uneasy compromise of sorts….”

 

 

Scholarly Communication After COVID – Major Research Report Available Now

“The effect of the pandemic on research funding, university budgets, and researchers’ needs

The coronavirus pandemic has both disrupted research, and acted as a catalyst for change. Publishers, societies and providers of related services urgently need intelligence and analysis to inform short-term responses and longer-term planning.

“This study, carried out between November 2020 and February 2021, provides up-to-the-minute insight drawn from two global surveys (with responses from 10,000+ researchers and 600+ librarians) and a review of over 100 announcements, articles and other relevant documents from funders, institutions and researchers.

Expert analysis highlights the key implications, identifies the emerging opportunities, and sets out clear recommendations for putting the report’s findings into practice….”

Scholarly Communication After COVID – Major Research Report Available Now

“The effect of the pandemic on research funding, university budgets, and researchers’ needs

The coronavirus pandemic has both disrupted research, and acted as a catalyst for change. Publishers, societies and providers of related services urgently need intelligence and analysis to inform short-term responses and longer-term planning.

“This study, carried out between November 2020 and February 2021, provides up-to-the-minute insight drawn from two global surveys (with responses from 10,000+ researchers and 600+ librarians) and a review of over 100 announcements, articles and other relevant documents from funders, institutions and researchers.

Expert analysis highlights the key implications, identifies the emerging opportunities, and sets out clear recommendations for putting the report’s findings into practice….”

Factors associated with high Altmetric Attention Score in dermatology research – Iglesias?Puzas – – Australasian Journal of Dermatology – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Background

Alternative metrics are emerging scores to assess the impact of research beyond the academic environment.

Objective

To analyse whether a correlation exists between manuscript characteristics and alternative citation metrics.

Materials and methods

This bibliometric analysis included original articles published in the five journals with the highest impact factors during 2019.

We extracted the following characteristics from each record: journal, publication month, title, number of authors, type of institution, type of publication, research topic, number of references, financial support, free/open access status and literature citations. The main measure was the identification of variables of higher social attention (measured by the Altmetric Attention Score ?25) using binary logistic regression. Model performance was assessed by the change in the area under the curve (AUC).

Results

A total of 840 manuscripts were included. The Altmetric scores across all five journals ranged from 0 to 465 (mean 12.51 ± 33.7; median 3). The most prevalent topic was skin cancer, and the study design was clinical science. The scientific journal (P < 0.001), the presence of conflicts of interest (OR 2.2 [95%CI 1.3–3.7]; P = 0.002) and open access status OR 3.2 [95%CI 1.6–6.7]; P = 0.002) were found as independent predictors of high Altmetric scores.

Conclusions

Our study suggests an article´s social recognition may be dependent on some manuscript characteristics, thus providing useful information on the dissemination of dermatology research to the general public.

Both Questionable and Open Research Practices Are Prevalent in Education Research – Matthew C. Makel, Jaret Hodges, Bryan G. Cook, Jonathan A. Plucker, 2021

Abstract:  Concerns about the conduct of research are pervasive in many fields, including education. In this preregistered study, we replicated and extended previous studies from other fields by asking education researchers about 10 questionable research practices and five open research practices. We asked them to estimate the prevalence of the practices in the field, to self-report their own use of such practices, and to estimate the appropriateness of these behaviors in education research. We made predictions under four umbrella categories: comparison to psychology, geographic location, career stage, and quantitative orientation. Broadly, our results suggest that both questionable and open research practices are used by many education researchers. This baseline information will be useful as education researchers seek to understand existing social norms and grapple with whether and how to improve research practices.

 

The open access effect in social media exposure of scholarly articles: A matched-pair analysis – ScienceDirect

“Highlights

 

• The paper examines OA effect when a journal provides two types of link to the same subscription article: OA and paid content.

• OA links perform better than paid content links. When not indicating the OA status of a link, the performance drops greatly.

• OA benefits all countries, but its positive impact is slightly greater for developed countries.

• Combining social media dissemination with OA appears to enhance the reach of scientific information….”

 

Access to Supplemental Journal Article Materials: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  The use of supplemental journal article materials is increasing in all disciplines. These materials may be datasets, source code, tables/figures, multimedia, or other materials that previously went unpublished, were attached as appendices, or were included within the body of the work. Current emphasis on critical appraisal and reproducibility demands that researchers have access to the complete life cycle to fully evaluate research. As more libraries become dependent on secondary aggregators and interlibrary loan, we questioned if access to these materials is equitable and sustainable. While NISO RP-15-2013 Recommended Practices for Online Supplemental Journal Article Materials was published in 2013, it is unclear if these recommended practices fully meet the needs of users; if aggregators and publishers are following these standards; and if library processes and procedures are facilitating access to supplemental journal article materials. While studies have surveyed authors, reviewers, and readers, or examined journal supplemental materials practices, no studies have surveyed library staff and librarians about their experience with access to supplemental materials and requesting and receiving supplemental materials through interlibrary loan. This presentation reported on a study surveying library employees from academic, hospital, public and special library settings in the United States about their experiences identifying, finding, and retrieving supplemental journal article materials; and proposes ways that libraries, publishers and aggregators can enable access to the complete published life cycle.

 

Exploring Perpetual Access: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  When libraries transitioned their collection development from primarily print to greater reliance on e-resources, acquisition methods also shifted from a sales contract to a licensing business model. This shift effected the long-held perception that academic libraries support education and research through the preservation and provision of the scholarly record in perpetuity. Libraries can encourage copyright holders to participate in digital preservation initiatives, but to date few initiatives have seen a large uptake. Open Access publishing further amplifies this vulnerable situation. At risk is the assurance that digital scholarly content in all formats remains available to future users. This review of the digital preservation landscape examines a variety of case studies that shed light on the impact e-resource licensing strategies have on safeguarding perpetual access; the use of the unique rights libraries have under copyright law to preserve intellectual property; and the technological access complexities of digital preservation. Recognizing that practical, economic, and culturally responsive initiatives are limited by a library’s local capacity, the need to preserve e-resources has energized an increasing number of collaborative solutions. Using the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ concept that local efforts help build a National Digital Platform, this scan of diverse initiatives explores the evolving framework emerging in support of ensuring future access to digital scholarship.

 

Global citation inequality is on the rise | PNAS

Abstract:  Citations are important building blocks for status and success in science. We used a linked dataset of more than 4 million authors and 26 million scientific papers to quantify trends in cumulative citation inequality and concentration at the author level. Our analysis, which spans 15 y and 118 scientific disciplines, suggests that a small stratum of elite scientists accrues increasing citation shares and that citation inequality is on the rise across the natural sciences, medical sciences, and agricultural sciences. The rise in citation concentration has coincided with a general inclination toward more collaboration. While increasing collaboration and full-count publication rates go hand in hand for the top 1% most cited, ordinary scientists are engaging in more and larger collaborations over time, but publishing slightly less. Moreover, fractionalized publication rates are generally on the decline, but the top 1% most cited have seen larger increases in coauthored papers and smaller relative decreases in fractional-count publication rates than scientists in the lower percentiles of the citation distribution. Taken together, these trends have enabled the top 1% to extend its share of fractional- and full-count publications and citations. Further analysis shows that top-cited scientists increasingly reside in high-ranking universities in western Europe and Australasia, while the United States has seen a slight decline in elite concentration. Our findings align with recent evidence suggesting intensified international competition and widening author-level disparities in science.