Universal Funders’ Policy on Open Deposition of Publication-Associated Records

“A condition of being awarded funding by [FUNDER] is that researchers commit to making all source evidence such as data and computer code supporting published research — hence referred to in this policy as the records — publicly available as Open Access outputs, to the maximum extent permitted by relevant legal and ethical requirements. Where the materials can be legally and ethically published and made available, they must be released in synchrony with peer-reviewed outputs rather than at the end of the project. “Data will be available upon (reasonable) request from the corresponding author(s)” will no longer be acceptable in publications featuring work funded by [FUNDER]. …”

Universal Funders’ Policy on Open Deposition of Publication-Associated Records

“A condition of being awarded funding by [FUNDER] is that researchers commit to making all source evidence such as data and computer code supporting published research — hence referred to in this policy as the records — publicly available as Open Access outputs, to the maximum extent permitted by relevant legal and ethical requirements. Where the materials can be legally and ethically published and made available, they must be released in synchrony with peer-reviewed outputs rather than at the end of the project. “Data will be available upon (reasonable) request from the corresponding author(s)” will no longer be acceptable in publications featuring work funded by [FUNDER]. …”

Virtual Event Awards

“We aim to improve access to open data science practices and tools and support communities in open data science to grow sustainably and inclusively. We will support these communities with grants for virtual events focused on improving or connecting research-driven data science tools, practices, and the communities themselves.  Proposals must demonstrate the educational and scientific purposes of the event (or series of events) and specifically how it advances Code for Science and Society’s goal to create inclusive knowledge-sharing spaces and support the development of diverse leaders. We aim to invest in both emerging or established events that demonstrate a commitment to making science inclusive and accessible. International applicants are welcome! Applicants are encouraged to make use of resources that provide information on and support for best practices in conference planning….”

From research creation to dissemination | Research Information

“With the above objectives in mind, EBSCO has now partnered with companies that support open research and enable institutions to gain better stewardship over the totality of their research output: Code Ocean, protocols.io and Arkivum. The first two of these companies provide solutions for the creation, sharing, publication and reuse of computational code, data and research methods. Arkivum, on its part, ensures the long-term data management and preservation of research. Through these partnerships, libraries may support and deliver open platforms to the research community and, at the same time, benefit from improved visibility into and stewardship over the research that is created within the institution….

Guide and Toolbox to Replicability and Open Science in Entomology | Journal of Insect Science | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  The ability to replicate scientific experiments is a cornerstone of the scientific method. Sharing ideas, workflows, data, and protocols facilitates testing the generalizability of results, increases the speed that science progresses, and enhances quality control of published work. Fields of science such as medicine, the social sciences, and the physical sciences have embraced practices designed to increase replicability. Granting agencies, for example, may require data management plans and journals may require data and code availability statements along with the deposition of data and code in publicly available repositories. While many tools commonly used in replicable workflows such as distributed version control systems (e.g., ‘git’) or script programming languages for data cleaning and analysis may have a steep learning curve, their adoption can increase individual efficiency and facilitate collaborations both within entomology and across disciplines. The open science movement is developing within the discipline of entomology, but practitioners of these concepts or those desiring to work more collaboratively across disciplines may be unsure where or how to embrace these initiatives. This article is meant to introduce some of the tools entomologists can incorporate into their workflows to increase the replicability and openness of their work. We describe these tools and others, recommend additional resources for learning more about these tools, and discuss the benefits to both individuals and the scientific community and potential drawbacks associated with implementing a replicable workflow.

 

PsyArXiv Preprints | Easing Into Open Science: A Tutorial for Graduate Students

Abstract:  This article provides a roadmap to assist graduate students to engage in open science practices. We suggest eight open science practices that novice graduate students could begin adopting today. The topics we cover include journal clubs, project workflow, preprints, reproducible code, data sharing, transparent writing, preregistration, and registered reports.

 

The Argument for Open Research in the Time of COVID-19

“Many funders and health organizations are demanding that research approaches and results be made open. Preprints have offered one solution, and their value during this challenging time has been evident in the huge volume of COVID-19 related content appearing online. For example, this collection of COVID-19 SARS-CoV-2 preprints on medRxiv and bioRxiv has more than 1900 manuscripts.

Now, protocols.io and Code Ocean are working to ensure that those research approaches remain open. These open access online tools are ideal repositories for all protocol and methodological approaches as well as computational pipelines and code. Online collaborative research tools are helpful to researchers who are restricted in how they can work and collaborate. For those at the frontline conducting scientific research, these tools serve as an ideal way to share their insights and approaches.

Here’s how protocols.io and Code Ocean are supporting the research community during this unprecedented time:…”

Call for transparency of COVID-19 models | Science

“A hallmark of science is the open exchange of knowledge. At this time of crisis, it is more important than ever for scientists around the world to openly share their knowledge, expertise, tools, and technology. Scientific models are critical tools for anticipating, predicting, and responding to complex biological, social, and environmental crises, including pandemics. They are essential for guiding regional and national governments in designing health, social, and economic policies to manage the spread of disease and lessen its impacts. However, presenting modeling results alone is not enough. Scientists must also openly share their model code so that the results can be replicated and evaluated.

Given the necessity for rapid response to the coronavirus pandemic, we need many eyes to review and collectively vet model assumptions, parameterizations, and algorithms to ensure the most accurate modeling possible. Transparency engenders public trust and is the best defense against misunderstanding, misuse, and deliberate misinformation about models and their results. We need to engage as many experts as possible for improving the ability of models to represent epidemiological, social, and economic dynamics so that we can best respond to the crisis and plan effectively to mitigate its wider impacts.

We strongly urge all scientists modeling the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its consequences for health and society to rapidly and openly publish their code (along with specifying the type of data required, model parameterizations, and any available documentation) so that it is accessible to all scientists around the world. We offer sincere thanks to the many teams that are already sharing their models openly. Proprietary black boxes and code withheld for competitive motivations have no place in the global crisis we face today. As soon as possible, please place your code in a trusted digital repository (1) so that it is findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (2).”

Supporting Open Research Workflows and Digital Collaboration

“When researchers do not have a platform to create and share code, data and methods, the institution loses ‘stewardship’ over the totality of research output as well as the ability for researchers to leverage current and past work. Hence, reproducibility and re-use are at the core of open science and a focus of research institutions and institutes. Join us for a conversation with researchers to discuss tools like Code Ocean and protocols.io and their key components that improve the research process for both the researcher and institution….”

Investigating the Scholarly Git Experience Survey

“You have been invited to take part in a research study to learn more about how people in academia interact with version control, specifically Git, and source code hosting platforms (e.g. GitLab, SourceForge, GitHub). This study will be conducted by Vicky Steeves and Sarah Nguyen of NYU Division of Libraries.

If you agree to be in this study, you will be asked to complete a 30 question survey about version control and source code hosting….”