Publishers ‘swift to release Covid-19 research’ – STM Association | Research Information

“The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM) has been swift to respond to the thirst for knowledge and as early as February this year, was co-ordinating the efforts of the academic publishing  community to make all research papers on Covid-19 freely available. Within weeks, publishers had responded emphatically, making more than 50,000 Covid-19 related papers freely available. To date, almost 150 million people have read or downloaded this research, making it one of the most sought-after topics of all time. …”

Publishers ‘swift to release Covid-19 research’ – STM Association | Research Information

“The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM) has been swift to respond to the thirst for knowledge and as early as February this year, was co-ordinating the efforts of the academic publishing  community to make all research papers on Covid-19 freely available. Within weeks, publishers had responded emphatically, making more than 50,000 Covid-19 related papers freely available. To date, almost 150 million people have read or downloaded this research, making it one of the most sought-after topics of all time. …”

Data Availability Statements Tips – STM Research Data

“6 Quick General Tips

Encourage the use of persistent identifiers or PIDs (for example, DOIs for datasets, ORCIDs for authors, RRIDs for reagents – more information can be found on the ORCID website here)
Engage with journal editors, learned societies and other domain leaders to work out what standards, identifiers and language are appropriate for the community. You could use the RDA policy framework as the outline for the conversation. 
It is preferable to upload data to a repository, and include a link within a research article, rather than hosting via a supplementary material facility.
Sometimes data do need to be kept closed, but this doesn’t need to be the default situation. Ask the researcher/author why should it be closed rather than why should it be open. 
Where possible, have some information (metadata) in front of any paywall to point to where underlying data can be found. See the following examples:…”

Coronavirus (Covid-2019) : Publisher support for combating COVID-19

“STM’s members have acted rapidly and decisively to support the continued global response to the rapid worldwide spread of COVID-19 with immediate access to accurate and validated articles and monographs that the public can trust.

In direct response to the health emergency, publishers provided free access to relevant peer reviewed publications to ensure that throughout the duration of the outbreak, research and data quickly reaches the widest possible audiences. On the 30th January STM reached out to members to coordinate and broaden the wider efforts to make relevant research quickly and freely available. Over the subsequent days and weeks, more than 32,000 articles, chapters and other resources have been made findable and useable in this manner. This resource page was deployed on the 10th February, whilst throughout the month, publishers worked to continue to identify and improve the use of resources in tandem with world governments and non-governmental organisations. Agreements have been made to ensure that resources are available under terms and in formats that enable machine analysis and reuse. The publishing community is committed to helping combat COVID-19. We continue to offer researchers the full range of publisher systems and solutions to enhance their abilities to address the global health crisis and hope that these provisions will aid the global response and make a difference. Below are links to publisher’s resource hubs and freely available articles. (Last updated 15th April 2020)…”

Coronavirus (Covid-2019) : Publisher support for combating COVID-19

“STM’s members have acted rapidly and decisively to support the continued global response to the rapid worldwide spread of COVID-19 with immediate access to accurate and validated articles and monographs that the public can trust.

In direct response to the health emergency, publishers provided free access to relevant peer reviewed publications to ensure that throughout the duration of the outbreak, research and data quickly reaches the widest possible audiences. On the 30th January STM reached out to members to coordinate and broaden the wider efforts to make relevant research quickly and freely available. Over the subsequent days and weeks, more than 32,000 articles, chapters and other resources have been made findable and useable in this manner. This resource page was deployed on the 10th February, whilst throughout the month, publishers worked to continue to identify and improve the use of resources in tandem with world governments and non-governmental organisations. Agreements have been made to ensure that resources are available under terms and in formats that enable machine analysis and reuse. The publishing community is committed to helping combat COVID-19. We continue to offer researchers the full range of publisher systems and solutions to enhance their abilities to address the global health crisis and hope that these provisions will aid the global response and make a difference. Below are links to publisher’s resource hubs and freely available articles. (Last updated 15th April 2020)…”

Introducing the STM 2020 Research Data Year

“STM has declared 2020 the ‘STM Research Data Year’ and is working with publishers and other partners to boost effective sharing of research data:

SHARE: Increase the number of journals with data policies and articles with Data Availability Statements (DAS)
LINK: Increase the number of journals that deposit the data links to the SCHOLIX framework
CITE: Increase the citations to datasets along the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles…”

Is it Finally the Year of Research Data? – The STM Association Thinks So – The Scholarly Kitchen

“At the recent Researcher to Reader conference in London, Mark Allin (@allinsnap) had the job of doing the conference round-up, which is the slot immediately before the closing keynote where the themes and take-homes of the conference are brought together. In his four summary themes, Allin inevitably drew out Open Access / Open Science. It’s almost impossible to have a publishing or library conference without it, however, in terms of significance, he put it at the bottom of the list, almost as an afterthought. His reasoning is that open science now feels like an inevitability. With a clear trend towards both open access and open data mandates among funders, institutions, and publishers, the question that each of us must ask ourselves isn’t whether it will or should happen, but how are we going to adapt as change continues….

Practices around open research data are gaining traction. In 2019’s The State of Open Data Report, 64% of respondents claimed that they made their data openly available in 2018. That’s a rise of 4% from the previous year. Comprehensive information on the prevalence of open data policies is hard to come by, but there is a general sense that publishers, funders, and institutions alike are all moving towards firstly having data policies and then steadily strengthening those policies over time. 

The JoRD project, based at Nottingham University in the UK was funded by Jisc and ran from December 2012 until its final blog post in 2014. In this article, Sturges et al., report that JoRD found the state of open data policies among journals to be patchy and inconsistent, with about half of all the journals they looked at having no policy at all, and with 75% of those that did exist being categorized as weak….

Unfortunately, the short timescale of the JoRD project limits its findings to a snapshot. However, there has since been piecemeal evidence of progress towards a more robust open research data landscape. The case studies presented in this article by Jones et al., — a different Jones, not me — describe how both Taylor and Francis, and Springer Nature have followed the path of steadily increasing the number of journals with data policies while strengthening those that exist….”

[STM Association open letter to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy]

“STM publishers support all models and approaches that have the potential to lead to a more open scholarly communication environment and a greater empowerment of researchers. We continue to work diligently with stakeholders across the research ecosystem to build towards a future where quality, rigor, replicability, reproducibility, and integrity of research can be sustained while meeting the access needs of researchers and the public in an open and collaborative manner. We were therefore alarmed to learn that the Administration may be considering a precipitous move to require immediate access to any article that reports on Federally funded research, without due consideration of the impact of such a policy on research and discovery and the costs to the taxpayer of a shift to open access….”

STM comment on cOAlition S Guidance on Implementation – Addendum

“STM agrees that targets and milestones are necessary to measure the transition to Open Access, but mandating them may run counter to our overall shared goal. With only 6% of all journal articles connected to funding by the current cOAlition S membership, the specified targets will be difficult to achieve and support without a significant number of new funders and institutions willing to financially support the transition to OA. Setting a blanket ‘tipping point’ does not recognise the differences in funding which exist across research communities. Some journals would be able to transition to full OA when they reach a 50% penetration rate, however others would not prove sustainable with the remaining 50% made up of many unfunded authors….”

STM comment on cOAlition S Guidance on Implementation – Addendum

“STM agrees that targets and milestones are necessary to measure the transition to Open Access, but mandating them may run counter to our overall shared goal. With only 6% of all journal articles connected to funding by the current cOAlition S membership, the specified targets will be difficult to achieve and support without a significant number of new funders and institutions willing to financially support the transition to OA. Setting a blanket ‘tipping point’ does not recognise the differences in funding which exist across research communities. Some journals would be able to transition to full OA when they reach a 50% penetration rate, however others would not prove sustainable with the remaining 50% made up of many unfunded authors….”