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Knowledge Exchange (KE) brings together six organizations from six countries. Their common objective is to examine the issues related to research support and infrastructure and service development.

Members:

CNRS (France),
CSC (Finland),
DEIC (Denmark),
DFG   (Germany),
JISC (United Kingdom),
SURF (Netherlands).

Recent results:

About monographs;

A landscape study on open access and monographs –  DOI: 10.5281 / zenodo.815932
Knowledge Exchange Survey on Open Access Monographs – DOI: 10.5281 / zenodo.1475446
Towards a Roadmap for Open Access Monographs – DOI: 10.5281 / zenodo.3238545

Preprints

Accelerating scholarly communication – The transformative role of preprints – DOI: 10.5281 / zenodo.3357727

Economy of Open Science

Insights into the Economy of Open Scholarship: A Collection of Interviews – DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.2840171
Open Scholarship and the need for collective action – DOI 10.5281/zenodo.3454688

 

Knowledge Exchange Openness Profile – Knowledge Exchange

“Part of KE’s work on Open Scholarship aims to enhance the evaluation of research and researchers. This currently does not cover recognition of non-academic contributions to make Open Scholarship work, such as activities to open up and curate data for re-use, or making research results findable and available. Our approach is to raise more awareness on the lack of recognition in current evaluation practice and work towards a possible solution, through the development of an ‘Openness Profile’.

The KE Open Scholarship Research Evaluation task & finish group works on the awareness issue, listing all academic and non-academic contributions that are essential to Open Scholarship and should be recognised when evaluating research. The group also works on the Openness Profile, a tool that is meant to allow evaluation of currently ignored contributions that are essential for Open Scholarship. For the development of the Openness Profile we seek involvement of various key stakeholders and alignment with current identifiers such as DOI and ORCID iD.

By demonstrating the immaturity of current research evaluation practice, and by developing the Openness Profile tool, KE supports researchers as well as non-researchers to get credit for all their contributions that make Open Scholarship possible. Our ambition is that recognition of these essential activities becomes part of standard research evaluation routine….”

Knowledge Exchange Openness Profile – Knowledge Exchange

“Part of KE’s work on Open Scholarship aims to enhance the evaluation of research and researchers. This currently does not cover recognition of non-academic contributions to make Open Scholarship work, such as activities to open up and curate data for re-use, or making research results findable and available. Our approach is to raise more awareness on the lack of recognition in current evaluation practice and work towards a possible solution, through the development of an ‘Openness Profile’.

The KE Open Scholarship Research Evaluation task & finish group works on the awareness issue, listing all academic and non-academic contributions that are essential to Open Scholarship and should be recognised when evaluating research. The group also works on the Openness Profile, a tool that is meant to allow evaluation of currently ignored contributions that are essential for Open Scholarship. For the development of the Openness Profile we seek involvement of various key stakeholders and alignment with current identifiers such as DOI and ORCID iD.

By demonstrating the immaturity of current research evaluation practice, and by developing the Openness Profile tool, KE supports researchers as well as non-researchers to get credit for all their contributions that make Open Scholarship possible. Our ambition is that recognition of these essential activities becomes part of standard research evaluation routine….”

Introducing the Open Scholarship Framework at FORCE2019 – Knowledge Exchange

“As part of Knowledge Exchange’s (KE) work on Open Scholarship, Knowledge Exchange has developed a framework that maps the considerations for Open Scholarship across a variety of scales, phases and arenas. The three dimensions of the framework allow us to articulate the changes occurring in scholarly communications in tangible ways. 

The first dimension addresses the level of granularity (Macro, Meso, Micro) of actors; the second dimension is the phase of the research (Discovery, Planning, Project Phase, Dissemination); and the third dimension is the arena (Political, Economic, Social, Technological).

Having developed these concepts and conversations with several expert groups and projects, we held a pre-conference workshop, as part of the FORCE2019 conference, to engage a wider group of experts to test and further refine the Framework….”

Introducing the Open Scholarship Framework at FORCE2019 – Knowledge Exchange

“As part of Knowledge Exchange’s (KE) work on Open Scholarship, Knowledge Exchange has developed a framework that maps the considerations for Open Scholarship across a variety of scales, phases and arenas. The three dimensions of the framework allow us to articulate the changes occurring in scholarly communications in tangible ways. 

The first dimension addresses the level of granularity (Macro, Meso, Micro) of actors; the second dimension is the phase of the research (Discovery, Planning, Project Phase, Dissemination); and the third dimension is the arena (Political, Economic, Social, Technological).

Having developed these concepts and conversations with several expert groups and projects, we held a pre-conference workshop, as part of the FORCE2019 conference, to engage a wider group of experts to test and further refine the Framework….”

The Knowledge Exchange and Transitional Open Access for Smaller Publishers | Jisc scholarly communications

“The KE partner countries share the vision of Open Scholarship and immediate access to all publicly-funded research and have launched initiatives to help small publishers with their efforts to make a transition to Open Access and/or comply with the recommendations in Plan S. Below are some of the activities undertaken in five of the six partnering countries….”