Cultural Observatory – Culturomics

The Cultural Observatory at Harvard is working to enable the quantitative study of human culture across societies and across centuries. We do this in three ways:

  • Creating massive datasets relevant to human culture
  • Using these datasets to power wholly new types of analysis
  • Developing tools that enable researchers and the general public to query the data …”

Building Capacity for Digital Humanities: A Framework for Institutional Planning | EDUCAUSE

Abstract:  A growing number of researchers in the humanities are using computational tools and methods that are more typically associated with social and scientific research. These tools and techniques enable researchers to pursue new forms of inquiry and new questions and bring more attention to—and cultivate broader interest in—traditional humanities and humanities data. This paper from ECAR and the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) outlines a practical framework for capacity building to develop institutional digital humanities support for IT staff, librarians, administrators, and faculty with administrative responsibilities.

Open Data Grant Winners to Conduct Sentiment Analysis of Thousands of French Revolution Pamphlets | Newberry

“Today, you can see trends on Twitter at a glance and get immediate insights into the public discourse surrounding current events. But how can we learn about trending topics and public opinion in centuries past? The recipients of the Newberry’s Open Data Grant intend to find out. The Open Data Grant helps support innovative scholarship that applies technologies such as digital mapping, text mining, and data visualization to digitized primary sources. Joseph Harder, a chemist and data scientist, and Mimi Zhou, an expert in digital humanities studying early French literature, will use the award to complete a sentiment analysis of the Newberry’s recently digitized collection of more than 30,000 French Revolution pamphlets….”

European survey on scholarly practices and digital needs in the arts and humanities – Highlights Report | Zenodo

“Between 10-15% of respondents reported very frequent use of open access journals or publications, institutional portals and repositories, personal blogs or websites, and scholarly communities such as Academia and ResearchGate, to disseminate their work. A larger percentage, between 35-45%, use this ‘tetrad’ of dissemination channels regularly. On the other hand, eight out of ten state that they have used open content journals or publication, albeit seldom….”

Scholarly Equivalents of the Monograph? An Examination of some Digital Edge Cases | hc:14557 | Humanities CORE

Abstract:  This brief report was completed as part of the AHRC-funded Academic Book of the Future project. The purpose of this report is to query whether born digital “edge cases” can be considered to be the scholarly quivalent of the academic book. For a list of all reports and resources generated by the project, see: https://academicbookfuture.org/links-and-resources/