DARIAH | Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities

DARIAH is an ERIC, a pan-european infrastructure for arts and humanities scholars working with computational methods. It supports digital research as well as the teaching of digital research methods.

How does DARIAH work?
DARIAH is a network. It connects several hundreds of scholars and dozens of research facilities in currently 17 european countries, the DARIAH member countries. In addition DARIAH has several cooperating partner institutions in countries not being a member of DARIAH, and strong ties to many research projects across Europe. People in DARIAH provide digital tools and share data as well as know-how. They organize learning opportunities for digital research methods, like workshops and summer schools, and offer training materials for Digital Humanities.

Working groups
The DARIAH community also works together in working groups, with subjects ranging from the assessment of digital tools to the development of standards and the long term accessibility of research materials. Their activities may vary but they all share one common goal: Providing services to scholars in the arts and humanities and therefore helping to do research at its best.

Want to become part of the network?
DARIAH is open to everyone. Whether you would like to participate in one of DARIAH’s working groups, work towards your country becoming a DARIAH partner, like to see your institution cooperate with DARIAH, or you are just looking for someone to share know-how and to support your research project, get in touch with us: info@dariah.eu….”

News – Liverpool University Press journal, Francosphères, to flip to full open-access with funding from the Open Library of Humanities

“We are extremely pleased to announce that our international library partners have voted to accept Francosphères’ application to join the Open Library of Humanities. This is part of our partnership with Liverpool University Press, and is the second journal – following Quaker Studies last year– that has moved from a subscription model to our full open-access model. Francosphères is a highly respected journal devoted to transcultural and intercultural French Studies edited by an international team based in Paris, Oxford and London. Established in 2012 to support recent advances in postcolonial and gender theory, the journal has been publishing articles in English and French that seek to explore and interrogate the presence of French language and culture across frontiers and borders and how this is legitimated in ‘Francophone’ culture.”

Cultural Observatory – Culturomics

The Cultural Observatory at Harvard is working to enable the quantitative study of human culture across societies and across centuries. We do this in three ways:

  • Creating massive datasets relevant to human culture
  • Using these datasets to power wholly new types of analysis
  • Developing tools that enable researchers and the general public to query the data …”

Building Capacity for Digital Humanities: A Framework for Institutional Planning | EDUCAUSE

Abstract:  A growing number of researchers in the humanities are using computational tools and methods that are more typically associated with social and scientific research. These tools and techniques enable researchers to pursue new forms of inquiry and new questions and bring more attention to—and cultivate broader interest in—traditional humanities and humanities data. This paper from ECAR and the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) outlines a practical framework for capacity building to develop institutional digital humanities support for IT staff, librarians, administrators, and faculty with administrative responsibilities.

Open Data Grant Winners to Conduct Sentiment Analysis of Thousands of French Revolution Pamphlets | Newberry

“Today, you can see trends on Twitter at a glance and get immediate insights into the public discourse surrounding current events. But how can we learn about trending topics and public opinion in centuries past? The recipients of the Newberry’s Open Data Grant intend to find out. The Open Data Grant helps support innovative scholarship that applies technologies such as digital mapping, text mining, and data visualization to digitized primary sources. Joseph Harder, a chemist and data scientist, and Mimi Zhou, an expert in digital humanities studying early French literature, will use the award to complete a sentiment analysis of the Newberry’s recently digitized collection of more than 30,000 French Revolution pamphlets….”

European survey on scholarly practices and digital needs in the arts and humanities – Highlights Report | Zenodo

“Between 10-15% of respondents reported very frequent use of open access journals or publications, institutional portals and repositories, personal blogs or websites, and scholarly communities such as Academia and ResearchGate, to disseminate their work. A larger percentage, between 35-45%, use this ‘tetrad’ of dissemination channels regularly. On the other hand, eight out of ten state that they have used open content journals or publication, albeit seldom….”

Scholarly Equivalents of the Monograph? An Examination of some Digital Edge Cases | hc:14557 | Humanities CORE

Abstract:  This brief report was completed as part of the AHRC-funded Academic Book of the Future project. The purpose of this report is to query whether born digital “edge cases” can be considered to be the scholarly quivalent of the academic book. For a list of all reports and resources generated by the project, see: https://academicbookfuture.org/links-and-resources/