Terms and conditions for research grants | Parkinson’s UK

“Once a grant has been awarded [by Parkinson’s UK] and accepted, the grantholder and host institution are bound by our research grant terms and conditions and revenue sharing policy….”

The policy was apparently new or updated in July 2018.

EU set to snub hybrid open-access journals

“The EU’s 2021-27 R&D programme will not pay for articles to be published in hybrid open-access journals under proposals published by the European Commission.

Horizon Europe will pay article processing charges only “for purely open-access publishing venues (i.e. not ‘hybrid’ journals)” under Commission proposals published on 7 June. The current programme Horizon 2020 does support hybrid journals. The change would be controversial as it could prevent researchers from publishing in their first-choice locations….

A Commission source told Research Europe that the Commission is dropping its support for hybrid journals in part because they “do not currently appear to support a transition towards full open-access publishing models”. The source added that national funders are better placed to negotiate with publishers on the offsetting of subscription fees in hybrid models….

The Commission’s move will force researchers funded by Horizon Europe to publish either in fully open-access journals or through the green model if they want the programme to foot the bill.

Steven Inchcoombe, chief publishing officer at Springer Nature, said the decision was “likely to decrease open-access publication overall and risk a significant regression in open-access uptake” because hybrid journals “play an important role in aiding the transition to open access”. Springer Nature reported last month that it published about 3,900 articles with UK-based corresponding authors in its hybrid journals in 2017, compared with about 4,450 articles in its fully open-access journals….”

 

Sign of an unexpected way in which #Brexit could help #openaccess?

“…This doesn’t have to be read as a sign that Brexit could help OA. But here’s how to read it that way. Non-EU nations who clear certain hurdles can already benefit from EU research funds, and those funds are subject to an #openaccess mandate. If the UK leaves the EU, then the EC may lower those hurdles. This wouldn’t increase the amount of money with an OA string on it. (Horizon 2020 is what it is.) But it would spread the European OA mandate to more countries, making OA closer to the default in more places.”

[Wellcome Trust consultation on revising its OA policy]

“Wellcome is conducting a review of its open access (OA) policy. The aim of this review is to ensure that knowledge and discoveries which arise from publications stemming from our funding are shared and used to maximise their benefit to health. This open consultation forms part of the review process and responses will be used by our internal working group to inform the outcome….”

Open Science Policy Statements for AHA Funded Research

” ‘Outbound’ Public Access

The American Heart Association (AHA) requires that all journal articles resulting from AHA funding (“outbound” research) be made freely available in PubMed Central (PMC) within 12 months of publication. It is the responsibility of the awardee to ensure journal articles are deposited into PMC….

‘Inbound’ Public Access

All original research articles in the 11 subscription-model AHA journals (“inbound” research) are made freely available on each respective journal website 6 months after publication. All non-original research articles are made freely available on each respective journal web site 12 months after publication. Scientific statements and clinical practice guidelines are made freely available immediately on publication.

The Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA) is the AHA open access journal. Because it utilizes an author pays model, the author pays for publication costs and retains copyright. The AHA is granted a nonexclusive license of all rights of copyright in and to the article. JAHA articles are deposited in PMC on publication….”

Doris Duke Medical Research Program Guidelines and Policies

See the OA policy at pp. 7-8.

“The foundation requires that any publication based on a DDCF-funded research project must be made freely available and downloadable online in a timely manner and with as few restrictions as possible, in order to ensure that DDCF-funded research can be accessed, read and built upon. Starting with grants made in 2013, DDCF grantees and their institutions must agree to fulfill this requirement by depositing all documents accepted for publication resulting from their DDCF-funded research project into the National Institutes of Health’s PubMed Central (“PMC”) in accordance with the following stipulations:

? Documents are defined to include all authors’ final manuscripts accepted for publication, including all modifications from the publishing and peer review process (the “postprints”);

? Documents are to be deposited in PMC upon the grantee’s receipt of notification of acceptance for publication;

? Grantees may impose an embargo on PMC’s public release of the documents that ends no later than 12 months after the official date of publication. 8 Access to PMC is made available to the grantee through DDCF’s membership in the Health Research Alliance (HRA) (a national consortium of non-governmental, nonprofit funders of biomedical research and training) and DDCF’s registration of data about its clinical research grants in the HRA reporter database. DDCF will provide detailed instructions for depositing documents in PMC to grantees upon DDCF’s receipt of a fully executed grant agreement.” 

NOT-OD-14-124: NIH Genomic Data Sharing Policy

“The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announces the final Genomic Data Sharing (GDS) Policy that promotes sharing, for research purposes, of large-scale human and non-human genomic1 data generated from NIH-funded research.  A summary of public comments on the draft GDS Policy and NIH’s responses are also provided….”