Scholarly Communications Librarian – The University of Chicago Library

“This position leads development of the University of Chicago’s growing scholarly communication services and policies; and contributes in meaningful ways to our recently launched (2018) Center for Digital Scholarship.

Open access, copyright, research data management and dissemination, institutional repository services, data preservation, and curation, are critical aspects of scholarly communication, from access to archiving. We encourage candidates with a strong, access-centered vision of scholarly communications-related services, such as scholarly publishing and guidance on research data management, to apply for our Scholarly Communication Librarian (SCL) position. This position leads development of the University of Chicago’s growing scholarly communication services and policies; and contributes in meaningful ways to our recently launched (2018) Center for Digital Scholarship, which includes the Dissertation Office. The SCL collaborates with others to develop training, workshops and other programming around data management, author rights, copyright, and open scholarship….”

Scholarly Communications Librarian – The University of Chicago Library

“This position leads development of the University of Chicago’s growing scholarly communication services and policies; and contributes in meaningful ways to our recently launched (2018) Center for Digital Scholarship.

Open access, copyright, research data management and dissemination, institutional repository services, data preservation, and curation, are critical aspects of scholarly communication, from access to archiving. We encourage candidates with a strong, access-centered vision of scholarly communications-related services, such as scholarly publishing and guidance on research data management, to apply for our Scholarly Communication Librarian (SCL) position. This position leads development of the University of Chicago’s growing scholarly communication services and policies; and contributes in meaningful ways to our recently launched (2018) Center for Digital Scholarship, which includes the Dissertation Office. The SCL collaborates with others to develop training, workshops and other programming around data management, author rights, copyright, and open scholarship….”

Scholarly Communication and Open Access in Psychology: Current Considerations for Researchers

Abstract:  Scholarly communication and open access practices in psychological science are rapidly evolving. However, most published works that focus on scholarly communication issues do not target the specific discipline, and instead take a more “one size fits all” approach. When it comes to scholarly communication, practices and traditions vary greatly across the disciplines. It is important to look at issues such as open access (of all types), reproducibility, research data management, citation metrics, the emergence of preprint options, the evolution of new peer review models, coauthorship conventions, and use of scholarly networking sites such as ResearchGate and Academia.edu from a disciplinary perspective. Important issues in scholarly publishing for psychology include uptake of authors’ use of open access megajournals, how open science is represented in psychology journals, challenges of interdisciplinarity, and how authors avail themselves of green and gold open access strategies. This overview presents a discipline-focused treatment of selected scholarly communication topics that will allow psychology researchers and others to get up to speed on this expansive topic. Further study into researcher behavior in terms of scholarly communication in psychology would create more understanding of existing culture as well as provide early career researchers with a more effective roadmap to the current landscape. As no other single work provides a study of scholarly communication and open access in psychology, this work aims to partially fill that niche.

 

F1000Research flies the nest – F1000 Blogs

“I am delighted to announce today that F1000 Research Ltd has been acquired by Taylor & Francis Group (part of Informa plc). This is a hugely exciting opportunity for us. For a start, it will expedite our growth through the greater financial support and resources of a very large established organisation with extensive geographical and disciplinary reach. But most exciting to me, it will give us the opportunity to directly influence one of the ‘Big 4’ publishers to support the transition towards more open and collaborative ways of working, enabled though new approaches to scholarly publishing.   

It will be no surprise to many that F1000 Research is now transferring to a new owner. Our founder, Vitek Tracz has an impressive track record of nurturing ideas through start-up companies, and taking them to a level where they are ready to fly the nest. We will be following in the footsteps of many of his companies that have gone on to exciting and successful onward lives in the hands of others including BioMed Central (where Vitek initiated the Open Access movement in collaboration with PubMed Central), Current Opinions series, Current Biology, Current Drugs, Current Patents, IDdb3, Telmap, The Scientist, and many more.

Since F1000 Research’s conception, Vitek has been adamant that he would only ever sell F1000 Research to an organisation that he is convinced is fully committed to not only maintaining our vision and supporting us to scale up but also to ultimately transform the whole industry over time. Both Vitek and I feel confident that we have found such an organisation in Taylor & Francis, its CEO Annie Callanan and her executive leadership team, and I am very excited to continue to lead F1000 Research in this next phase….”

2019 Scholarly Communications Research Grant Recipients Announced – ACRL Insider

“ACRL is pleased to announce the recipients of its Scholarly Communications Research Grants in 2019. These grants of up to $5,000 each support new research that will contribute to more inclusive systems of scholarly communications in areas suggested by the 2019 report Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications: Creating a More Inclusive Future (available for download or purchase).

The selection committee from ACRL’s Research and Scholarly Environment Committee chose seven proposals from a highly competitive round of applications. The grant recipients are:

Tatiana Bryant (Adelphi University) and Camille Thomas (Florida State University) for a project titled “Attitudes Towards Open Access Publishing Amongst Faculty of Color”
Jennifer Chan (University of California, Los Angeles) and Juleah Swanson (University of Colorado Boulder) for a project titled “SCORE Analysis: Leveraging Institutional Data to Bring Balance Back into the Scholarly Landscape”
Amanda Makula and Laura Turner (University of San Diego) for a project titled “Collaborative Collection Development: Inviting Community-Owned Public Scholarship into the Academic Library”
Gemmicka Piper (Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis) for a project titled “Barriers to Minority Faculty Open Knowledge Production”
Mantra Roy (San Jose State University) for a project titled “Global South Speaks: A Librarianship Perspective”
Teresa Schultz and Elena Azadbakht (University of Nevada, Reno) for a project titled “Accessible Open Educational Resources Project”
Carolyn Sheffield, Michelle Flinchbaugh (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Carolyn Cox (University of Baltimore), Adam Zukowski (Towson University), Robin Sinn, Caitlin Carter (Johns Hopkins University), Katherine Pitcher (St. Mary’s College), Trevor Muñoz, and Terry Owens (University of Maryland, College Park) for a project titled “A Roadmap to the Future of Promotion & Tenure”…”

Southeastern Resource Sharing and Scholarly Communication Conference

“Meet colleagues from across the Southeast and discuss ways to strengthen regional resource sharing and scholarly communication in all its aspects and among all types of libraries. We’ll cover interlibrary loan, document delivery, copyright, open access and education, consortial borrowing, regional and institutional repositories, shared collections, digital publishing, and more. Sessions will include presentations, panel discussions, lightning talks, posters, and consortia meetings. Mix and mingle with your neighbors and frequent resource sharing and scholarly communication partners while enjoying our classic southern hospitality.”

Co-creating Open Infrastructure to Support Diversity and Equity

“To reframe our priorities in this way requires collective will and coordination across regions and institutions to build new kinds of support for resource reallocation. It further requires institutional courage and political will to declare that open, autonomous, and equitable systems are preferred over “prestigious” Euro-centric research systems that continue to undermine other epistemic communities from around the world. It requires that disciplines and societies prioritize who they have been centering in their research, whose voices they’ve been amplifying, and whose they have been silencing. Supporting the status quo while leaving initiatives that reflect epistemic diversity and knowledge equity as second-tier priorities will result in continued entrenchment of status quo inequities and the marginalization of truly innovative, equitable systems….”

Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement | Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)

“Academic and research librarians increasingly recognize scholarly communication as a core competency of the profession. Whether helping researchers meet their funder’s mandates for public access and data sharing, guiding responsible copyright practice, or supporting new types of scholarship and instruction, librarians are leading change across campus and around the world. With this workshop, ACRL empowers our community in accelerating the transformation of the scholarly communication system.

This workshop has been updated with a series of targeted modules that reflect the most exciting and pressing issues in the field today. The goal of the structured, interactive program is to equip participants with knowledge and skills to help accelerate the transformation of the scholarly communication system.

You can bring this workshop at full cost to your campus year round. Additionally, ACRL offers a partial subsidy on a competitive basis for up to five hosts each academic year. The deadline to apply to host the subsidized version in 2020 is Friday, November 15, 2019. View more information about the subsidized program….”

Duke ScholarWorks

“As technology continues to evolve, the possibilities and challenges of scholarly publishing evolve with it. You can share your work broadly, online, without necessarily working with a publisher. Or you may want to do additional things to make your work available that your publisher is not ready to help with. How can you best reach your intended audiences, build engagement, track use, be rewarded for your work, and sustain your publication or project over time?

Staff of the ScholarWorks center in Duke Libraries can help members of the Duke community with all of the above, and much more. See scholarworks.duke.edu and the menu items above, or contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas, and we’ll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help.

The mission of the ScholarWorks Center for Scholarly Publishing is to make scholarly publishing better: more sustainable, fair, and open. Our focus is particularly on how to help Duke researchers to benefit from changes in scholarly publishing and to help them in turn to create positive change in the broader publishing ecosystem….”

CFP: Scholarly Communication Librarianship and Open Culture: Law, Economics, and Publishing – OER + ScholComm

“We are pleased to announce a call for proposals for Unit 3 contributions (see more details below) in our upcoming edited open book, Scholarly Communication Librarianship and Open Culture: Law, Economics, and Publishing, to be openly published by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) in electronic and print formats. Authors retain copyright of their contributions, but commit to open publication in the CC-BY-NC book.

Proposals will be accepted in three areas:

Perspectives – situated and self-reflexive discussions of topics of importance in scholarly communication
Intersections – examples of and reflections on the intersection of scholarly communication with other areas of academic librarianship or other stakeholders
Case Studies – stories and lessons learned drawn from experience by librarians engaged in scholarly communication work…”