Hypothesis Awarded $2M of New Funding From The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation – Hypothesis

“Hypothesis is pleased to announce that it has recently been awarded $2 million in new funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This is our sixth grant from the Mellon Foundation, and we are grateful for their continued endorsement of our mission and work to scale the use of open, standards-based web annotation and the Hypothesis annotation tool suite in scholarship and research. Specifically, the focus of this multi-year grant, Scaling Annotation in Scholarship and the Humanities, will be to support feature enhancements and program development for Hypothesis’ annotation software and services, with an emphasis on the arts and humanities. With the support of the Mellon Foundation, Hypothesis has made substantial progress in adding important features such as group functions and moderation, realizing a W3C standard for web annotation, building the Annotating All Knowledge Coalition to bring together major publishers and scholarly platforms around open annotation, and growing our user base in the arts and humanities through outreach in publishing and education. This new round of funding will enable us to capitalize on our previous work and current trends in scholarship, publishing and education to accelerate growth in annotation and execute our business strategy for long term sustainability….”

The ‘Care-full’ Commons: Open Access and the Care of Commoning | scholarly skywritings

“Talk given to the Radical Open Access 2 Conference in Coventry, 27 June 2018 as part of a panel on the commons and care. The talk was published as part of a pamphlet alongside pieces by Joe Deville and Tahani Nadim: https://hcommons.org/deposits/item/hc:19817/

Introduction ‘

The commons’ is a term routinely employed by advocates of open access publishing to describe the ideal scholarly publishing ecosystem, one comprised entirely of freely available journal articles, books, data and code. Usually undefined, advocates invoke the commons as a good-in-itself, governed by the scholarly community and publicly accessible to all. The term itself is not associated with an identifiable politico-economic ideology, nor does it entail any particular form of organisation or practice. Without further justification, the term ‘commons’ has little meaning beyond referring to the various degrees of community control and/or accessibility associated with certain resources. This paper will illustrate some of the uses (and abuses) of the commons in scholarly publishing, aiming to highlight both the ambiguity of the term and some of the drawbacks of treating the commons as fixed and static entity focused on the production and management of shared resources, as many do. While it certainly relates to resources and their governance, I want to reposition the commons – or ‘commoning’ specifically – as a practice of cultivating and caring for the relationships that exist around the production of shared resources. In reorienting the commons in this way, I will show how an attitude of commoning extends beyond the commons site itself and into the relationships present in other forms of organisation also. This allows us to reposition the commons towards a shared, emancipatory horizon while maintaining the need for a plurality of commons-based practices in publishing and beyond. A progressive and emancipatory commons, I argue, is therefore a space of ‘care-full commoning’….”

Publications | Free Full-Text | Editorial-Transitioning Publications to Open Peer Review | HTML

“This is my first Editorial since the honour of becoming the new Editor-in-Chief for Publications. In this first note I’d like to take the opportunity to introduce the newly revised journal aims and scope, which now more clearly reflect the growing agenda for greater transparency and participation throughout scholarly communications, and to announce the introduction of optional open peer review as a new step in this direction for the journal.”

The SPAR Ontologies

“Over the past eight years, we have been involved in the development of a set of complementary and orthogonal ontologies that can be used for the description of the main areas of the scholarly publishing domain, known as the SPAR (Semantic Publishing and Referencing) Ontologies. In this paper, we introduce this suite of ontologies, discuss the basic principles we have followed for their development, and describe their uptake and usage within the academic, institutional and publishing communities….”

Linked Research

“Linked Research is an initiative, a movement, and a manifesto. We believe that scholarly communication is stunted by current academic publishing practices, and we aim to promote change for the greater good. This is not something hypothetical or a dream for the future, it is completely possible with today’s technologies. A cultural shift is needed, and Linked Research is here to bring together like-minded people who want to push this forwards.

Linked Research is not biased towards any particular tool or technology; we understand that different researchers and disciplines have different needs and desires around scholarly communication. We encourage the use of any technologies that comply with the Linked Research principles….”

Publish your research in a space you control, on your own terms. You do not need permission to make your work accessible to all….Create unique identifiers for everything you think is important, from data objects to sections of prose, so others can refer to and reuse them….Reuse and link to other research and data so nothing goes to waste or is reinvented. Keep a machine-readable trace of inspirations and derivations….Have an open comments policy so that anyone can review and generate discussion around your work….Reject information silos, paywalls, academic box-ticking, and archaic and artificial barriers. Be the change; publish your research using a free culture license, and openly review the work of others….”

Linked Research

“Linked Research is an initiative, a movement, and a manifesto. We believe that scholarly communication is stunted by current academic publishing practices, and we aim to promote change for the greater good. This is not something hypothetical or a dream for the future, it is completely possible with today’s technologies. A cultural shift is needed, and Linked Research is here to bring together like-minded people who want to push this forwards.

Linked Research is not biased towards any particular tool or technology; we understand that different researchers and disciplines have different needs and desires around scholarly communication. We encourage the use of any technologies that comply with the Linked Research principles….”

Publish your research in a space you control, on your own terms. You do not need permission to make your work accessible to all….Create unique identifiers for everything you think is important, from data objects to sections of prose, so others can refer to and reuse them….Reuse and link to other research and data so nothing goes to waste or is reinvented. Keep a machine-readable trace of inspirations and derivations….Have an open comments policy so that anyone can review and generate discussion around your work….Reject information silos, paywalls, academic box-ticking, and archaic and artificial barriers. Be the change; publish your research using a free culture license, and openly review the work of others….”

Linked Research: An Approach for Scholarly Communication

Abstract:  The future of scholarly communication involves research results, analysis and data all being produced, published, verified and reused interactively on the Web, with ‘papers’ linking to and from each other at a granular level. The academic process of peer review is increasingly becoming open, transparent and decentralised. More broadly, the mechanism for global knowledge sharing is becoming an ongoing conversation between experts, policy makers, implementers, and the general public. This vision is radical, and getting there requires understanding of, and change in, a number of interrelated areas. In this article we break down the problem space and define requirements for advancement towards a Web-based ecosystem for scholarly communication: Linked Research. We discuss our strategy for tackling each of these areas. This includes how we can build on and combine existing well-known technologies and practices for digital publishing, social interactions, decentralised data storage, and semantic data enrichment. We provide an initial assessment of our proposed strategy through an example implementation of tooling which sets out to meet the requirements.

Linked Research: An Approach for Scholarly Communication

Abstract:  The future of scholarly communication involves research results, analysis and data all being produced, published, verified and reused interactively on the Web, with ‘papers’ linking to and from each other at a granular level. The academic process of peer review is increasingly becoming open, transparent and decentralised. More broadly, the mechanism for global knowledge sharing is becoming an ongoing conversation between experts, policy makers, implementers, and the general public. This vision is radical, and getting there requires understanding of, and change in, a number of interrelated areas. In this article we break down the problem space and define requirements for advancement towards a Web-based ecosystem for scholarly communication: Linked Research. We discuss our strategy for tackling each of these areas. This includes how we can build on and combine existing well-known technologies and practices for digital publishing, social interactions, decentralised data storage, and semantic data enrichment. We provide an initial assessment of our proposed strategy through an example implementation of tooling which sets out to meet the requirements.