Announcing “Mind the Gap,” a major report on all available open-source publishing software | The MIT Press

“Mellon-funded report Mind the Gap: A Landscape Analysis of Open Source Publishing Tools and Platforms catalogs and analyzes all available open-source software for publishing and warns that open publishing must grapple with the dual challenges of siloed development and organization of the community-owned ecosystem…

The MIT Press is pleased to release Mind the Gap: A Landscape Analysis of Open Source Publishing Tools and Platforms (openly published at mindthegap.pubpub.org), a major report on the current state of all available open-source software for publishing. Funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the report “shed[s] light on the development and deployment of open-source publishing technologies in order to aid institutions’ and individuals’ decision-making and project planning.” It will be an unparalleled resource for the scholarly publishing community and complements the recently released Mapping the Scholarly Communication Landscape census….”

Mind the Gap

“The number of open source (OS) online publishing platforms, i.e. production and hosting systems for scholarly books and journals, launched or in development, has proliferated in the last decade. Many of these publishing infrastructure initiatives are well-developed, stable, and supported by a small but vigorous distributed community of developers, but promising new ventures have also recently launched.

The notable increase in the number of OS platforms suggest that an infrastructure ‘ecology’ is emerging around these systems. Distinguishing between systems that may evolve along competitive lines and those that will resolve into a service ‘stack’ of related, complementary service technologies will help potential adopters understand how these platforms can or should interoperate.

In 2018 the MIT Press secured a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon foundation to conduct a landscape analysis of open source publishing systems, suggest sustainability models that can be adopted to ensure that these systems fully support research communication and provide durable alternatives to complex and costly proprietary services. John Maxwell at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver conducted the environmental scan and compiled this report.

 

We are posting the final report on PubPub and invite readers to share their comments on the findings and recommendations….”

 

Mind the Gap

“The number of open source (OS) online publishing platforms, i.e. production and hosting systems for scholarly books and journals, launched or in development, has proliferated in the last decade. Many of these publishing infrastructure initiatives are well-developed, stable, and supported by a small but vigorous distributed community of developers, but promising new ventures have also recently launched.

The notable increase in the number of OS platforms suggest that an infrastructure ‘ecology’ is emerging around these systems. Distinguishing between systems that may evolve along competitive lines and those that will resolve into a service ‘stack’ of related, complementary service technologies will help potential adopters understand how these platforms can or should interoperate.

In 2018 the MIT Press secured a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon foundation to conduct a landscape analysis of open source publishing systems, suggest sustainability models that can be adopted to ensure that these systems fully support research communication and provide durable alternatives to complex and costly proprietary services. John Maxwell at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver conducted the environmental scan and compiled this report.

 

We are posting the final report on PubPub and invite readers to share their comments on the findings and recommendations….”

 

Senior Program Officer, Scholarly Communications, Mellon Foundation

“The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (“Foundation”) invites nominations and applications for the position of Senior Program Officer (“SPO”) for Scholarly Communications (“SC”) to succeed Donald J. Waters, who is retiring after 20 years of dedicated and exceptional service.

The Foundation is a not-for-profit, grantmaking organization that seeks to strengthen, promote, and defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies. Scholarly Communications, which was established under the Foundation’s umbrella in 1999, is one of the Foundation’s four core program areas. Through this program, the Foundation assists libraries, archives, museums, universities, presses, and arts organizations in realizing the potential of digital technologies to further the collective understanding of societies and cultures around the world. As it exists today the program promotes the common good by supporting the creation, dissemination, use, and preservation of original sources, interpretive scholarship in the humanities, and other scholarly and artistic materials. Scholarly Communications grants have given rise to scores of nonprofit enterprises, including: Artstor, Digital Public Library of America, Hypothes.is, Ithaka, LOCKSS, and Portico; dozens of new types of professions, such as scholarly communications librarians, digital repository managers, digitization specialists, and data curators; and a large variety of standards and digital tools for knowledge-making. Broadly, the program aims to develop the sustainable tools, organizations, and networks of scholars and other professionals needed for these purposes, thereby making these resources available for potentially broader audiences and users.

The successful candidate will be an individual who is deeply immersed in innovative conversations around the challenges and opportunities that exist in the field of scholarly communications today and its future. Drawing upon her/his/their academic background and administrative experience in a related field, the next SPO will ensure that cultural and scholarly records are preserved for future work, teaching, and research; that records are accessible broadly; and that the economics surrounding this work are viable outside of forprofit industries. She/he/they will also embrace the possibility of reimagining and redefining this program area to best meet the challenges and opportunities of today through initiatives such as prioritizing the support of community-engaged research and knowledge or building previously underprioritized areas, in addition to the work traditionally supported by the Foundation….”

Digital Public Library of America receives $622,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to Expand Access to Nation’s Digital Collections | DPLA

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is pleased to announce a new $622,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to strengthen and expand its national cultural heritage network and platform. DPLA’s cultural heritage aggregation program has been its signature achievement since launching in 2013, making over 34 million items—photographs, maps, news footage, oral histories, manuscript documents, artwork, and more—from 4,000 libraries, museums, and archives across the country freely discoverable to all. 

The new two-year grant from the Mellon Foundation will enable DPLA to support the current and future activities and priorities of its national network and continue to make their materials available to everyone. DPLA will work with its partners to develop new services and tools to support the needs of the diverse institutions in our cultural heritage network; build new partnerships to ensure that every institution in the country has a pathway to contribute materials to DPLA; promote the use of DPLA’s rich collections by learners of all stripes; and continue to work with our members to advance our shared goals of increasing access to our nation’s digital collections. …”

Exploring Open Access Ebook Usage | hc:24147 | Humanities CORE

Abstract:  This white paper was prepared by the Book Industry Study Group (BISG) as part of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded project, Understanding OA Ebook Usage: Toward a Common Framework. Primary authors are: Brian O’Leary (BISG) and Kevin Hawkins (University of North Texas). The project team, who contributed editing and improvements, include Charles Watkinson (University of Michigan), Lucy Montgomery (Curtin University/KU Research), Cameron Neylon (Curtin University/KU Research), and Katherine Skinner (Educopia Institute). Copyright for this white paper is held by BISG and licensed to the general public under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

Welcome to the Archives Unleashed Project

“Archives Unleashed aims to make petabytes of historical internet content accessible to scholars and others interested in researching the recent past. Supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, we are developing web archive search and data analysis tools to enable scholars, librarians and archivists to access, share, and investigate recent history since the early days of the World Wide Web….”

Open Access Books Program

Project MUSE’s Open Access (OA) Books Program offers publishers the ability to have their open access content available on the MUSE platform. The OA books are fully integrated with all the features and functionality of subscriber-only books and journals on Project MUSE….

Project MUSE charges a modest, one-time fee to cover the costs of publishing and supporting open access books on the platform. For a limited time in 2019, publishers can take advantage of the MUSE Open Access Books Program free of charge….”

Images of Works of Art in Museum Collections: The Experience of Open Access: A Study of 11 Museums

“No museum that has made the transition to open access for the images in its collection would return to its previous approach. Although challenges are still being resolved, such as the additional workload and the potential uncertainty about where images of works from their collections have been published, museum staff cited the satisfaction that comes from fulfillment of the museum’s mission as a tremendous positive. Most institutions are experiencing greater internal (and in the case of the Yale museums, university-wide) collaboration than in the past between museum departments and attribute this in part to their move to open access….”

Rebus Launches an Open Reading Initiative | REBUS Foundation

“After conducting primary research into the viability of a web-based system for open reading, we are now moving forward with its development, thanks to generous funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The Mellon Foundation is a leader in support to the arts and humanities, directed at the long-term well-being of diverse and democratic societies.

The US$873,000, two-year grant funds our ongoing work in the conception, design, and development of a reading and research platform, based on open principles and optimizing the reader’s experience. Users will be able to read, take notes, cite, and organize their collection, helping them write or produce other outputs that best suit their needs. A big focus is on developing partnerships with libraries and university presses as we develop the software, so that our work reflects the needs of the whole ecosystem….

Established in April 2016, the Rebus Foundation is a Canadian non-profit organization. Our objective is to help create an alternative publishing ecosystem, based on open principles. This reading initiative adds an important complement to the open publishing and project management platform of Rebus Community and the Rebus Press….”