Mapping the Scholarly Literature Found in Scopus on “Research Data Management”: A Bibliometric and Data Visualization Approach

Abstract:  INTRODUCTION Since the 2000s, interest in research data management (RDM) has grown considerably. As a result, a large body of literature has discussed a broad variety of aspects related to data management. But, few studies have examined and also interpreted from visual perception the intellectual structure and progressive development of the existing literature on RDM. METHODS Guided by five research questions, this study employed bibliometric techniques and a visualization tool (CiteSpace) to identify and analyze the patterns of the scholarly publications about RDM. RESULTS Through CiteSpace’s modeling and computing, the knowledge (or network) structures, significant studies, notable topics, and development trends in the literature of RDM were revealed. DISCUSSION The majority of the literature pertinent to RDM was published after 2002. Major research clusters within this interdisciplinary field include “scientific collaboration,” “research support service,” and “data literacy,” while the “scientific collaboration” research cluster was the most active. Topics such as “digital curation” and “information processing” appeared most frequently in the RDM literature. Additionally, there was a sharp increase in several specific topics, such as “digital library,” “big data,” and “data sharing.” CONCLUSION By looking into the “profile” of the literature on RDM, in terms of knowledge structure, evolving trends, and important topics in the domain, this work will add new information to current discussions about RDM, new service development, and future research focuses in this area.

Mapping the Scholarly Literature Found in Scopus on “Research Data Management”: A Bibliometric and Data Visualization Approach

Abstract:  INTRODUCTION Since the 2000s, interest in research data management (RDM) has grown considerably. As a result, a large body of literature has discussed a broad variety of aspects related to data management. But, few studies have examined and also interpreted from visual perception the intellectual structure and progressive development of the existing literature on RDM. METHODS Guided by five research questions, this study employed bibliometric techniques and a visualization tool (CiteSpace) to identify and analyze the patterns of the scholarly publications about RDM. RESULTS Through CiteSpace’s modeling and computing, the knowledge (or network) structures, significant studies, notable topics, and development trends in the literature of RDM were revealed. DISCUSSION The majority of the literature pertinent to RDM was published after 2002. Major research clusters within this interdisciplinary field include “scientific collaboration,” “research support service,” and “data literacy,” while the “scientific collaboration” research cluster was the most active. Topics such as “digital curation” and “information processing” appeared most frequently in the RDM literature. Additionally, there was a sharp increase in several specific topics, such as “digital library,” “big data,” and “data sharing.” CONCLUSION By looking into the “profile” of the literature on RDM, in terms of knowledge structure, evolving trends, and important topics in the domain, this work will add new information to current discussions about RDM, new service development, and future research focuses in this area.

Ivissem | Information Visualization & Social Scholarly Metric

“The mere identification of the most relevant Scientific Knowledge Objects (SKOs) in a particular topic is increasingly difficult due to the existing interfaces, returning massive lists of results. It is recognized that researchers are not merely producers of knowledge. Instead they are social actors who play a preponderant role in the discovery and filtering of scientific knowledge. The data that results from this social interaction provides an important basis for the design of various usage metrics, also known as aka altmetrics.

Access to the right and relevant information is paramount for scientific discoveries. IViSSEM aims to develop and test a new altmetric, called Social Scholarly Experience Metric. This metric will result from the application of Machine Learning techniques to different combinations of altmetrics and profiles of researchers. Its application will reflect the individual preferences in the process of finding a specific topic. The current massive lists of results will be replaced by an innovative interface based on advanced visualization techniques.

 

Objectives…

To design and develop a Linked Open Data based solution architecture that ensures data interoperability, data accessibility, data integration and data analytics with full aligned with international best practices.
To dynamicaly relate SKOs and researchers with knowledge organizations systems.
To clean, transform, store and give access to collected data in a triplestore….”

 

 

Incredible 19th-Century Botanical Catalog Put Online and Made Interactive

“Designer Nicholas Rougeux has spent the last year combining his love for data visualization with his tech skills to lovingly restore and place 19th-century texts online. After the success of Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours and the geometry tome Byrne’s Euclid, Rougeux is tackling a new topic—botanical illustration.

 

After scouring the internet for different 19th-century botanical catalogs, Rougeux set his sights on Illustrations of the Natural Orders of Plants by Elizabeth Twining. This 1868 two-volume catalog is the second edition of a work first published in 1849 (volume 1) and 1855 (volume 2). The rare first edition can go for upward of £40,000 (about $49,000), but luckily for Rougeux, the second edition is available for consultation online at the Internet Archive (volume 1, volume 2) and the Biodiversity Heritage Library….”

Understanding Open Access Data Using Visuals: Integrating Prospective Studies of Children’s Responses to Natural Disasters | SpringerLink

Abstract:  Background

As access to open data is increasing, researchers gain the opportunity to build integrated datasets and to conduct more powerful statistical analyses. However, using open access data presents challenges for researchers in understanding the data. Visuals allow researchers to address these challenges by facilitating a greater understanding of the information available.

Objectives

This paper illustrates how visuals can address the challenges that researchers face when using open access data, such as: (1) becoming familiar with the data, (2) identifying patterns and trends within the data, and (3) determining how to integrate data from multiple studies.

Method

This paper uses data from an integrative data analysis study that combined data from prospective studies of children’s responses to four natural disasters: Hurricane Andrew, Hurricane Charley, Hurricane Katrina, and Hurricane Ike. The integrated dataset assessed hurricane exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, social support, and life events among 1707 participants (53.61% female). The children’s ages ranged from 7 to 16 years (M?=?9.61, SD?=?1.60).

Results

Visuals serve as an effective method for understanding new and unfamiliar datasets.

Conclusions

In response to the growth of open access data, researchers must develop the skills necessary to create informative visuals. Most research-based graduate programs do not require programming-based courses for graduation. More opportunities for training in programming languages need to be offered so that future researchers are better prepared to understand new data. This paper discusses implications of current graduate course requirements and standard journal practices on how researchers visualize data.

Can Repositories be Attractive, Even Sexy, Features of Digital Libraries? Making Visualization Work for Institutional Repositories

A poster for the 11th International Digital Curation Conference.

Here’s a full-text article by the same authors, with the same title. (Beware, it link forces a download and the work will not display in your browser.)

http://jlsc-pub.org/journal_files/gl_uploads/manuscipt/1ff37e12-4b5f-4ab1-bb8e-6d7bb58ab227.docx

 

Webinar: Open Knowledge Maps | EIFL

Librarians, researchers and students are invited to join this EIFL webinar about Open Knowledge Maps, an interface that searches databases for research and presents search results visually, in the form of knowledge maps.

The knowledge maps provide an instant overview of a topic by showing the main areas researched at a glance, and papers related to each area. Papers found are clustered together into similar topics.

The Open Knowledge Maps interface searches more than 7,000 content sources in all disciplines, providing access to over 140 million documents. The knowledge maps include both closed and open access papers; however, they highlight open access papers, most of which can be accessed from within the interface….”