CORE Ambassadors

“While the adoption of open access, open data, open science and text mining practices are growing, CORE is proud to follow these developments and grow as a service. We are looking for enthusiastic organizations and individuals to volunteer as ambassadors to spread the word about CORE’s mission and services.

 

Become a CORE ambassador to enhance CORE’s efforts in advancing open access and supporting text-mining in your area by:

 

Updating the CORE Team with the community’s feedback about our services

Identifying repositories in your country harvested by CORE

Offering advice with regards to key national initiatives and projects in the area of open access infrastructure in your country

Presenting CORE to research stakeholders at local venues

Posting CORE news on blogs and social media

Sharing information about CORE to local mailing lists, venues and contacts

Posting CORE news on blogs and social media…”

Invitation to participate in a new project: Help open journals’ deep backfiles | Everybody’s Libraries

“As I’ve noted here previously, there’s a wealth of serial content published in the 20th century that’s in the public domain, but not yet freely available online, often due to uncertainty about its copyright (and the resulting hesitation to digitize it).  Thanks to IMLS-supported work we did at Penn, we’ve produced a complete inventory of serials from the first half of the 20th century that still have active copyright renewals associated with them. And I’ve noted that there was far more serial material without active copyright, as late as the 1960s or even later.  We’ve also produced a guide to determining whether particular serial content you may be interested in is in the public domain.

Now that we’ve spent a lot of time surveying what is still in copyright though, it’s worth turning more focused attention to serial content that isn’t in copyright, but still of interest to researchers.  One way we can identify journals whose older issues (sometimes known as their “deep backfiles”) are still of interest to researchers and libraries is to see which ones are included in packages that are sold or licensed to libraries.   Major vendors of online journals publish spreadsheets of their backfile offerings, keyed by ISSN.  And now, thanks to an increasing amount of serial information in Wikidata (including links to our serials knowledge base) it’s possible to systematically construct inventories of serials in these packages that include, or might include, public domain and other openly accessible content….”

WikiJournal User Group – Wikiversity

“The WikiJournal User Group publishes a set of open-access, peer-reviewed academic journals with no publishing costs to authors. Its goal is to provide free, quality-assured knowledge. Secondly, it aims to bridge the Academia-Wikipedia gap by enabling expert contributions in the traditional academic publishing format to improve Wikipedia content….

Appropriate material is integrated into Wikipedia for added reach and exposure….

At least 2 reviewers per article. All peer reviews are published and publicly accessible….

All of our published articles are openly accessible under a free Creative Commons Cc.logo.circle.svg or similar license….

We are a fully non-profit journal with a volunteer board of editors, and we therefore have no publication charges of any kind….

The journal group is also currently applying to be a Wikimedia Foundation Sister Project. This would give greater control over the workings and formatting of the site, as well as a dedicated domain name….”

Copyright Review Program | www.hathitrust.org | HathiTrust Digital Library

“Each year we invite your continued participation and seek new team members for copyright review projects. 

Typically there will be a call for nominations in September and January each year.  The January 2019 open call has been completed and participants selected for this year.

There was an informational webinar about the Participating in the HathiTrust Copyright Review Program held on September 11, 1:00-2:00pm ET for anyone seeking to learn more about participation.  Slides and recording.

To nominate for a copyright team member position on the US Monographs project you must:

be employed at a HathiTrust member institution
have the support of your institution to contribute 6 hours of regular work time each week for a year
be present at online class training sessions or watch the recorded classes promptly (late Feb-Mar)…”

Copyright Review Program | www.hathitrust.org | HathiTrust Digital Library

“Each year we invite your continued participation and seek new team members for copyright review projects. 

Typically there will be a call for nominations in September and January each year.  The January 2019 open call has been completed and participants selected for this year.

There was an informational webinar about the Participating in the HathiTrust Copyright Review Program held on September 11, 1:00-2:00pm ET for anyone seeking to learn more about participation.  Slides and recording.

To nominate for a copyright team member position on the US Monographs project you must:

be employed at a HathiTrust member institution
have the support of your institution to contribute 6 hours of regular work time each week for a year
be present at online class training sessions or watch the recorded classes promptly (late Feb-Mar)…”

The In/Visible, In/Audible Labor of Digitizing the Public Domain

Abstract:  In this article I call for more recognition of and scholarly engagement with public, volunteer digital humanities projects, using the example of LibriVox.org to consider what public, sustainable, digital humanities work can look like beyond the contexts of institutional sponsorship. Thousands of volunteers are using LibriVox to collaboratively produce free audiobook versions of texts in the US public domain. The work of finding, selecting, and preparing texts to be digitized and published in audio form is complex and slow, and not all of this labor is ultimately visible, valued, or rewarded. Drawing on an ethnographic study of 12 years of archived discourse and documentation, I interrogate digital traces of the processes by which several LibriVox versions of Anne of Green Gables have come into being, watching for ways in which policies and infrastructure have been influenced by variously visible and invisible forms of work. Making visible the intricate, unique, archived experiences of the crowdsourcing community of LibriVox volunteers and their tools adds to still-emerging discussions about how to value extra-institutional, public, distributed digital humanities work.

The Wikipedia Library – Meta

The Wikipedia Library is an open research hub, a place for active Wikipedia editors to gain access to the vital reliable sources that they need to do their work and to be supported in using those resources to improve the encyclopedia. We aim to make access and use of sources free, easy, collaborative and efficient.

The Wikipedia Library is run by a team of Wikimedia Foundation staff and global volunteers. We operate on a community-organized satellite model: we administer the global project but work with local coordinators in local Wikipedia projects to help each community set up their own libraries….”

Cost models for running an online open journal | Journal of Open Source Software Blog

The Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS) is a free, open-access online journal, with no article processing charge (APC). We are committed to operating as a free service to our community, and we do so thanks to the volunteer labor of editors and reviewers, and by taking advantage of existing infrastructure. In this post, we examine the true costs of running a journal such as JOSS, and make the case that even when considering all services we don’t currently pay for, the true cost per paper would not exceed $100. Current APCs at many “gold” open-access journals exceed that by one or more orders of magnitude, (see, for example, PNASNatureIEEE, etc.)…”