Open Scholarship Knowledge Base

“A project

The Open Scholarship Knowledge Base is a collaborative initiative to curate and share knowledge about the what, why, and how of open scholarship. This includes reviewing, consolidating, organizing, and improving the discoverability of content to support the education and application of open practices for all aspects of the research lifecycle.

A community

Spearheaded by volunteers, the Open Scholarship Knowledge Base is a community of diverse individuals aligned by a shared goal to make learning and applying open research practices easier. It is being built by and for the community it aims to serve. Researchers, teachers, funders, librarians, and anyone wanting to open scholarship are welcome to edit, curate, and contribute to this community resource.

Join the community by contributing your favorite content to the OSKB through this content submission form!

A platform

Educational content (tutorials, workshop materials, videos, papers, and more) generated by the many contributors to open scholarship across disciplines and regions will be curated and maintained as openly accessible modules and trainings. For example, a user can discover content about data sharing that relates to their discipline, role, and data characteristics, and follow self-guided learning pathways on why and how to share their data….”

Open Scholarship Knowledge Base

“A project

The Open Scholarship Knowledge Base is a collaborative initiative to curate and share knowledge about the what, why, and how of open scholarship. This includes reviewing, consolidating, organizing, and improving the discoverability of content to support the education and application of open practices for all aspects of the research lifecycle.

A community

Spearheaded by volunteers, the Open Scholarship Knowledge Base is a community of diverse individuals aligned by a shared goal to make learning and applying open research practices easier. It is being built by and for the community it aims to serve. Researchers, teachers, funders, librarians, and anyone wanting to open scholarship are welcome to edit, curate, and contribute to this community resource.

Join the community by contributing your favorite content to the OSKB through this content submission form!

A platform

Educational content (tutorials, workshop materials, videos, papers, and more) generated by the many contributors to open scholarship across disciplines and regions will be curated and maintained as openly accessible modules and trainings. For example, a user can discover content about data sharing that relates to their discipline, role, and data characteristics, and follow self-guided learning pathways on why and how to share their data….”

Supporting Resource Sharing during COVID-19 with IFLA

“If your library’s ability to do resource sharing (i.e. ILL or document delivery) has been impacted by COVID-19, help is at hand. Interlibrary loan professionals at non-profit institutions can head to rscvd.org and volunteer librarians around the world will help to supply materials.

If you’re not having trouble filling requests, fantastic! We would appreciate your help in joining other incredible librarians who’ve volunteered to assist in filling the more than 850 requests we’ve been sent in just the past week.

The service, called “Resource Sharing during COVID-19” (or RSCVD for short, pronounced “received”), was started by IFLA’s Document Delivery and Resource Sharing (DDRS) Standing Committee in response to COVID-19’s impact on resource sharing. With library buildings being closed and many services moved fully online, often resource sharing activities have become either impossible or very difficult for many libraries. This all comes at a time when users’ information needs have often increased….”

Supporting Resource Sharing during COVID-19 with IFLA

“If your library’s ability to do resource sharing (i.e. ILL or document delivery) has been impacted by COVID-19, help is at hand. Interlibrary loan professionals at non-profit institutions can head to rscvd.org and volunteer librarians around the world will help to supply materials.

If you’re not having trouble filling requests, fantastic! We would appreciate your help in joining other incredible librarians who’ve volunteered to assist in filling the more than 850 requests we’ve been sent in just the past week.

The service, called “Resource Sharing during COVID-19” (or RSCVD for short, pronounced “received”), was started by IFLA’s Document Delivery and Resource Sharing (DDRS) Standing Committee in response to COVID-19’s impact on resource sharing. With library buildings being closed and many services moved fully online, often resource sharing activities have become either impossible or very difficult for many libraries. This all comes at a time when users’ information needs have often increased….”

LPForum20: Make the Open Access Directory Better for All: A Library Publishers Edit-a-thon | Library Publishing Coalition

“One of JeSLIB’s goals is to contribute to the Open Access and Library Publishing communities. There are many open access resources maintained by organizations around the world that are community driven. This means they depend on community input and crowd-sourcing.

The editors planned an interactive workshop, or edit-a-thon, to teach forum participants how to contribute to one of these community-driven platforms, The Open Access Directory (OAD). The OAD was co-founded by Peter Suber, Director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication and Director of the Harvard Open Access Project. OAD is hosted by the School of Library and Information Science at Simmons University, maintained by the OA community at large, and supervised by an independent editorial board….”

Scholarly publishers are working together to maximize efficiency during COVID-19 pandemic – OASPA

“Scholarly publishers are working together to maximize the efficiency of peer review, ensuring that key work related to COVID-19 is reviewed and published as quickly and openly as possible.

The group of publishers and scholarly communications organizations — initially comprising eLife, Hindawi, PeerJ, PLOS, Royal Society, F1000 Research, FAIRsharing, Outbreak Science, and PREreview — is working on initiatives and standards to speed up the review process while ensuring rigor and reproducibility remain paramount. The group has issued an Open Letter of Intent and is launching an initiative to ensure a rapid, efficient, yet responsible review of COVID-19 content.

The initiative is asking for volunteer reviewers with suitable expertise relevant to COVID-19, from all career stages and disciplines, to add their names to a “rapid reviewer list“. By doing so, these reviewers will be committing to rapid reviewing times, and upfront agreement that their reviews and identity can be shared among participating publishers and journals if submissions get rerouted for any reason….”

COVID-19 Publishers Open Letter of Intent – Rapid Review – OASPA

“The COVID-19 pandemic has created a new urgency to openly and rapidly share and review COVID-19 research. 

We, a group of publishers and scholarly communications organizations, are committing to work together on a cross-publisher rapid review and review transfer initiative. With the endorsement of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA) we are making the following calls to reviewers, editors, authors, and publishers in the research community, in order to maximize the efficiency and speed of the triage and peer review process of COVID-19 research.

To reviewers and authors:

We call on volunteer reviewers with suitable expertise relevant to COVID-19 from all career stages and disciplines, including those from industry, to sign up to a “rapid reviewer pool” and commit to rapid reviewing times, along with an upfront agreement that their reviews and identity can be shared among publishers and journals if submissions get rerouted. Please sign up in this form. 
We call on volunteer reviewers (whether or not they have signed up for rapid review) to identify and highlight important and crucial COVID-19 preprints (e.g. by using https://outbreaksci.prereview.org/), as early as possible, to optimise the limited time of expert reviewers who are subsequently invited to review the most important and promising research by a journal/platform.
We call on authors to support reviewers and publishers in this endeavour by ensuring the deposition of their submission as a preprint, and by working with publishers to make the peer-reviewed article and associated dataset, software, and model available for reuse as rapidly as possible….”

Wikipedia Editors Are Fighting The Coronavirus Both Online And Offline

““It is actually rare for me to become as involved in a set of articles as I have been in the coronavirus articles,” Dekimasu says. “However, there is a clear need for people to edit them, and I feel an ethical obligation to make them as helpful as possible, since they are getting hundreds of thousands of views every day.”

Those pages include the Wikipedia article for the virus itself, known as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2, the disease it causes, COVID-19, and the ongoing global pandemic the coronavirus has caused.

 

With so many eyes on Wikipedia’s coronavirus articles, providing accurate information is more important than ever. But it’s not blatantly inaccurate information that Dekimasu worries about, but the “subtle misinformation” that can appear….”