Acta Physiologica announces: publishing for nothing, open access for free for all German authors! – Persson – – Acta Physiologica – Wiley Online Library

“Dear authors, readers and friends of Acta Physiologica. How much has been written about the pros and cons of open access, also with regard to Acta?  Like it or not, the future may be  open access in one form, or another. Projekt DEAL may go into history as one of the first steps in this direction.  Germany, represented by the Max-Plank-Gesellschaft and Wiley, represented by Verlag Chemie reached an agreement to provide all authors from German institutions with open access at no [cost] to the authors. A milestone agreement in the eyes of many. What does this mean for Acta Physiologica? If you are currently affiliated with a German institution, you will be offered open access at no cost to you. In addition, in Acta authors of every country can enjoy free publishing.”

As Elsevier Falters, Wiley Succeeds in Open-Access Deal Making | The Scientist Magazine®

“Over the last few years, Project DEAL, a consortium that represents around 700 academic institutions in Germany, has been in negotiations for nationwide licensing agreements with three of the largest scholarly publishers—Elsevier, Springer Nature, and Wiley. Most of the news surrounding the effort has focused on disputes with Elsevier, which have led to lapses in subscriptions and lost access to the publisher’s journals. But the tune changed in January when DEAL announced its first triumph: a deal with Wiley.

Under the new agreement, which lasts for three years and commences in July, researchers at DEAL-represented institutions will be able to both publish open-access articles and read any papers in the publisher’s journals for a single fee. The final sum will depend on the total number of articles published by German researchers, which, according to the contract, is expected to amount to 9,500 papers per year and cost €26,125,000 (around $29.5 million USD) annually….”

Mixed reactions to Wiley German deal | Research Information

Concerns have been raised over a new publishing deal between Wiley and a German consortium of 700 research institutes, libraries and universities. 

The deal, which is being described as the first country-wide agreement in a leading research nation, was announced at the APE conference in Berlin, Germany in January but the details have only recently been made public. The deal is described as ‘publish and read’, a system that is seen by some as a move towards open access….

Commentators have pointed out that the deal protects German researchers from ‘double-dipping’ – they will no longer have to subscribe to Wiley’s journals as well as paying to publish in them – but there have also been complaints that researchers in the Netherlands are paying a significantly lower fee (1,600 euros) to publish with Wiley.

Jon Tennant, founder of the Open Science MOOC, tweeted: ‘I find it impossible to see this as a success in any way. Public funds are being directly converted into private profits. This is absurd. The per-article cost is more than buying a brand new MacBook pro. For publishing a paper. Zero goes to authors, zero to reviewers.’ “

Enough is Enough: UC Leadership and the Transformation of Scholarly Publishing – Scholarly Communications @ Duke

With the University of California’s (UC) announcement that they have broken off talks with mega-profitable commercial publisher Elsevier, we have moved closer to a tipping point in the ongoing struggle to correct asymmetries in the scholarly information ecosystem. Elsevier, along with the rest of the Big Five (Wiley, SpringerNature, Taylor & Francis, and Sage), has been put on notice: things as they are cannot stand. UC’s leadership in advancing open access is longstanding, and we applaud their continued efforts to seek new models that would transform scholarly publishing….

Elsevier’s present impasse with California should be understood in the context of the broader worldwide movement to transform scholarly communication. This is a movement that has seen significant recent acceleration, and it is one that transcends country and institution type. If and when Elsevier shuts off access to UC campuses, its researchers will be in good company, joining researchers from Germany and Sweden who have also seen their access cut off after negotiations failed to produce a transformative agreements. One wonders how many of the world’s researchers must lose access to Elsevier content before they finally come around to a position where they will be our partners in solving the scholarly communication problem. Let’s also keep in mind that UC was able to take this stand partially because the libraries have worked hard to help their faculty see the value in openness and the resulting UC Academic Senate support for this difficult decision. …”

Deal reveals what scientists in Germany are paying for open access | Science | AAAS

Project Deal, a consortium of libraries, universities, and research institutes in Germany, has unveiled an unprecedented deal with a major journal publisher—Wiley—that is drawing close scrutiny from advocates of open access to scientific papers….

Now, the numbers are out. Germany will pay Wiley €2750 for each paper published in one of the publisher’s so-called hybrid journals, which contain both paywalled and free papers. The contract anticipates researchers will publish about 9500 such papers per year, at a cost of €26 million. In addition, researchers will get a 20% discount on the price of publishing in Wiley journals that are already open access.

 

The deal is an important step toward more open access in scientific publishing, but the per paper fee of €2750 seems high, says Leo Waaijers, an open-access advocate and retired librarian at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Dutch researchers are paying Wiley just €1600 per paper under a similar deal in the Netherlands, he notes. “It’s the same process, the same product, so why the price difference?” he says….

The fact that the details of the German contract have become public is also important, Borrell-Damian says. “Contracts should be public because this is about public money spent,” she says. And if other countries sign similar deals, and the details become public, then “the whole game of price comparison may start,” Waaijers says. And that, open-access advocates say, could produce pressure for even lower publishing fees.”

Wiley Contract – Projekt DEAL

“We are happy to publish here the full text of the “Publish&Read” agreement between Project DEAL and Wiley signed 15th January 2019.

The forward-looking “Publish&Read” model at the basis of the agreement delivers the benefits of open access to authors and advances the principles of open science by enabling institutions and researchers alike to make the most of the opportunities that open dissemination in our digital environment provides….”

Thousands of scientists run up against Elsevier’s paywall

“Researchers at German institutions that have let their Elsevier subscriptions lapse while negotiating a new deal are hitting the paywall for the publisher’s most recent articles around 10,000 times a day, according to Elsevier — which publishes more than 400,000 papers each year.

But at least some German libraries involved in negotiating access to Elsevier say they are making huge savings without a subscription, while still providing any articles their academics request.

A major stumbling block to getting deals signed is institutions’ desire to combine the price they pay for subscriptions to pay-walled journals with the cost that libraries and researchers pay to make articles open-access….”

Wiley strikes open access deal with German universities and libraries | News | Chemistry World

German academic institutions have reached a ‘ground breaking’ nationwide deal to allow their researchers to make their work freely available around the world in journals published by Wiley – at no extra cost. For an agreed annual fee they’ll also have access to all Wiley’s content back to 1997.

Nearly three years ago, Project Deal – which represents 700 universities, libraries and research institutions – decided to take on the major scientific publishers in an attempt to secure a new type of contract they called ‘publish and read’. Talks reached a stalemate with the largest publisher, Elsevier, last June, while negotiations with Springer Nature are still going on. Horst Hippler, chief negotiator for Project Deal, is now ‘convinced the others will follow’….”

Wiley in ‘transformative’ partnership with German academic institutions | The Bookseller

“Wiley has signed what it describes as a “transformative” partnership with Projekt DEAL, which represents nearly 700 academic institutions in Germany.

The three-year agreement means that, for an annual fee, all those 700 institutions will have access to read Wiley’s academic journals dating back to 1997, while researchers at the institutions can publish articles open access with Wiley journals. The publisher said the partnership would “better support institutions and researchers in advancing open science, driving discovery, and developing and disseminating knowledge.”  …”