Open sesame: An in?genie?ous step towards open access – Malhi – 2019 – Bipolar Disorders – Wiley Online Library

“In this context, a recent initiative in Germany now allows German institutions to publish open access with publishers such as Wiley. The agreement between Projekt DEAL institutions and Wiley is part of a nationally coordinated strategy to enable a large?scale transition of today’s scholarly journals to open access. As of 2019, researchers from Projekt DEAL institutions can now read all Wiley journals and publish their own primary research and review articles open access, retaining copyright of their works. Wiley will not charge fees to authors covered by the agreement. The Publish and Read (PAR) fees and Gold Open Access APC’s related to the agreement will be paid centrally via institutions but might be subject to local institutional arrangements regarding internal allocation.

For authors publishing articles in Bipolar Disorders several additional national Open Access agreements are relevant from countries such as Norway, Hungary, Austria and the Netherlands. The details of these can be found via Wiley Author Services at https://authorservices-wiley-com.ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/author-resources/Journal-Authors/open-access/affiliation-policies-payments/index.html

These models are moving towards making information available freely to everyone, and everyone is essentially paying for it, accepting it as a necessity and human right. Granting bodies are increasingly funding publication and including these costs in their awards. Clearly the journals also benefit as broader access to a larger population will mean greater citations – enhancement of impact….”

Kumsal Bayazit, Elsevier CEO, shares her vision for building a better future in research

“First and foremost, I want to be very clear: Elsevier fully supports open access….

In fact, my professional background is in applying technology to content to help professionals make better decisions. For example, working in the part of RELX that serves legal professionals, I’ve seen the powerful benefits of analytical services that are built on top of freely available content, such as case law. This is why I’m excited by the potential to create value for researchers by applying text-mining and artificial intelligence technologies to the entire corpus of peer-reviewed content. I understand and appreciate the role that open access can play in delivering that vision.

The question is not whether open access is desirable or beneficial — the question is how we get there. My takeaway from my discussions on the topic is that there are many points of view. Publishers are often blamed for not making enough progress, which I think is fair. But it would also be unfair not to recognize the lack of alignment within our communities about the best way forward, which is understandable as this is a multi-dimensional issue that requires substantial problem-solving and action to make progress.

I am a pragmatist, and I commit to working pragmatically with libraries and other stakeholders to achieve shared open access goals. Part of this means acknowledging obstacles where they exist and discussing them openly and objectively so that we can find solutions to overcome them. If we don’t, progress will continue to be slow. I feel optimistic given the extent of commitment to make progress. In that spirit, please allow me to share t some of the obstacles that I have learned about in the last nine months….”

bjoern.brembs.blog » Scholarship has bigger fish to fry than access

” For the last 6-7 years, paying for subscriptions has ceased to be necessary for access. One sign of the changing times is the support that initiatives such as DEAL, Bibsam etc. have: two years without subscriptions to Elsevier and what do you hear out of, e.g., Germany? Crickets! Nothing! Of course, it would be silly to conclude that in these two years nobody in Germany has read any Elsevier articles. The reason for the silence and the continued support for DEAL is that we now can access anything we want without subscriptions….

With the realization that EOSC; Plan S, DEAL, etc. are actually working on different aspects of the same issue, the problem to be solved is no longer that scholars publish in toll-access journals, but that institutions haven’t come up with a more attractive alternative. If individuals are not to blame, than there is no reason to mandate them to do anything differently. Instead, institutions should be mandated to stop funding journals via subscriptions or APCs and instead invest the money into a modern, more cost-effective infrastructure for text, data and code. Obviously, in this specificity, this is nearly impossible to mandate in most countries. However, there is a mandate that comes very close. It has been dubbed “Plan I” (for infrastructure). In brief, it entails a three step procedure:

Build on already available standards and guidelines to establish a certification process for a sustainable scholarly infrastructure
Funders require institutional certification before reviewing grant applications
Institutions use subscription funds to implement infrastructure for certification….”

So What’s the DEAL?: An Interview with Springer Nature’s Dagmar Laging – The Scholarly Kitchen

“In late August, Springer Nature and Germany’s Projekt DEAL announced that they had signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) laying out the fundamentals of a national-level transformative open access agreement, whereby “more than 13,000 articles by German scholars and scientists are expected to be published open access (OA) per year, making them freely and immediately available to the world and increasing visibility and usage of German research published by Springer Nature.” I contacted Dagmar Laging, Springer Nature’s VP for Institutional Sales-Europe, who graciously agreed to answer some questions about this emerging deal….”

Open Access: Will the Paywalls Come Tumbling Down? | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic

“The drive to make publicly-funded research freely available to all interested parties has been gathering momentum over recent years with support from academics and funders and backing from the European Commission. Although there is a broad agreement that open access is best for everyone, methods of dismantling paywalls and ending systems of subscription are an ongoing subject of debate….”

Open Access: Will the Paywalls Come Tumbling Down? | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic

“The drive to make publicly-funded research freely available to all interested parties has been gathering momentum over recent years with support from academics and funders and backing from the European Commission. Although there is a broad agreement that open access is best for everyone, methods of dismantling paywalls and ending systems of subscription are an ongoing subject of debate….”

Mixed reception for German open access deal with Springer Nature | News | Chemistry World

“The academic publishing powerhouse Springer Nature has reached what it is touting as ‘the world’s most comprehensive open access agreement’ with a consortium of nearly 700 research universities in Germany. But there is some pushback to the arrangement….”

More than 700 German research institutions strike open-access deal with Springer Nature | Science | AAAS

“A consortium of more than 700 German research institutions and libraries today announced an agreement with publisher Springer Nature to make it simpler for authors to publish their papers open access. The agreement is the largest national open-access deal to date, but it doesn’t allow authors to publish open access in Nature or its sister journals.

The consortium, called Project DEAL, has negotiated for more than 3 years with major publishers to reach “publish and read” agreements. Such agreements give member institutions full access to a publisher’s online content and make papers that their researchers publish freely available worldwide. Charges are based not on subscriptions, but on a fee per published paper.

Project DEAL reached a similar agreement with the publisher Wiley in February, but this agreement is bigger. It is expected to cover more than 13,000 articles per year published by researchers working at German institutions, compared with roughly 9500 in Wiley journals. That makes it “the largest ever transformative agreement” for open access, Springer Nature CEO Daniel Ropers told a press conference here this morning….”

PROJEKT DEAL and SPRINGER NATURE reach understanding on world´s largest transformative Open Access agreement – German Rectors’ Conference

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed today in Berlin; final contract to be concluded later this year.
The agreement will be open to all member institutions of Projekt DEAL (700+ publically and privately funded academic and research organisations in Germany) which means substantially enhanced access to Springer Nature content for almost all of the German research landscape.
Through the agreement, more than 13,000 articles by German scholars and scientists are expected to be published open access (OA) per year, making them freely and immediately available to the world and increasing visibility and usage of German research published by Springer Nature.
The organisation of costs and services under this Transformative Agreement means researchers and students across all disciplines affiliated with the member institutions will be able to publish OA in the vast majority of the Springer Nature journal portfolio – around 2,500 Springer Nature hybrid and fully OA journals, as well as read the full contents of those journals including backfiles from 1997.
Signing of the MoU signals a significant step in Springer Nature’s commitment to being a leading force in driving the transition to OA and a notable advance on Projekt DEAL’s objectives of granting German authors ever more opportunity to publish their research fully and immediately OA for scholars of the world to read and build upon while containing the overall cost of scholarly communication.