Digital Science and the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics join forces to provide ISSI members with free access to Dimensions and Altmetric data  – Digital Science

“Digital Science, a leader in scholarly technology, is pleased to announce a collaboration with the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI) that will give ISSI members enhanced access to Dimensions and Altmetric data for scientometric research.

ISSI is an international association of scholars and professionals active in the interdisciplinary study science of science, science communication, and science policy. The ISSI community advances the boundaries of quantitative science studies, from theoretical, empirical, and practical perspectives.

Starting on October 1 2019, ISSI members will formally be invited to apply for no-cost access to Altmetric and Dimensions web tools and APIs. A committee of ISSI members will provide expert assessment of researchers’ applications and guidance on using Altmetric and Dimensions in their research.

This partnership builds upon Altmetric and Dimensions’ existing no-cost data sharing programs, which are currently open to all researchers conducting non-commercial scientometric research, while providing ISSI members with additional expert advice on early-stage research….”

Two new kids on the block: How do Crossref and Dimensions compare with Google Scholar, Microsoft Academic, Scopus and the Web of Science?

Abstract:  In the last 3 years, several new (free) sources for academic publication and citation data have joined the now well-established Google Scholar, complementing the two traditional commercial data sources: Scopus and the Web of Science. The most important of these new data sources are Microsoft Academic (2016), Crossref (2017) and Dimensions (2018). Whereas Microsoft Academic has received some attention from the bibliometric commu-nity, there are as yet very few studies that have investigated the coverage of Crossref or Dimensions. To address this gap, this brief letter assesses Crossref and Dimensions cover-age in comparison to Google Scholar, Microsoft Academic, Scopus and the Web of Science through a detailed investigation of the full publication and citation record of a single academic, as well as six top journals in Business & Economics. Overall, this first small-scale study suggests that, when compared to Scopus and the Web of Science, Crossref and Dimensions have a similar or better coverage for both publications and citations, but a substantively lower coverage than Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic. If our find-ings can be confirmed by larger-scale studies, Crossref and Dimensions might serve as good alternatives to Scopus and the Web of Science for both literature reviews and citation analysis. However, Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic maintain their position as the most comprehensive free sources for publication and citation data

Analyze the impact of the rising Open Access movement on your organization – Dimensions

Open Access is an integral part of the journey to a more collaborative research environment and continues to grow in importance across a variety of communities, including publishers, funders, librarians and of course the academic research community. Open Access in combination with Open Data has quickly become a key issue impacting both the quantity and the quality of scholarly communications.

In this recently published Digital Science Research report, Dimensions data were used to explore the implications that restricted access may impose and analyze current Open Access trends. Some of the reports key findings include that the volume of Open Access articles has clearly been rising in recent years and that countries that have invested in Open Access have typically increased their level of international collaboration.

All this and more can be discovered through Dimensions’ rich data and analytical capabilities as we recently developed and released a number of updates and new features which will help you to gain richer and more precise insights about Open Access for your organization.

Dimensions provides multiple filters to easily display results which are Open Access. Our filters are built around the four most commonly used basic classifications:

  • Bronze – available on websites hosted by their publisher, either immediately or following an embargo, but are not formally licensed for reuse.
  • Green – freely available somewhere other than the publisher’s website, e.g. in a subject or university repository, or the author’s personal website. Applies to self-archiving generally of the pre or post-print or potentially after an embargo period
  • Gold – refers to articles in fully accessible open access journals that are available immediately upon publication without a license
  • Hybrid – refers to subscription journals with open access to individual articles usually when a fee is paid to the publisher or journal by the author, the author’s organization, or the research funder….

Say you wanted to know how many gold Open Access papers by the University of Oxford, funded by the Wellcome Trust, were published in Springer Nature journals between 2013 – 2018? We made discovering that easy as you can see in the screenshot below….”

Analyze the impact of the rising Open Access movement on your organization – Dimensions

Open Access is an integral part of the journey to a more collaborative research environment and continues to grow in importance across a variety of communities, including publishers, funders, librarians and of course the academic research community. Open Access in combination with Open Data has quickly become a key issue impacting both the quantity and the quality of scholarly communications.

In this recently published Digital Science Research report, Dimensions data were used to explore the implications that restricted access may impose and analyze current Open Access trends. Some of the reports key findings include that the volume of Open Access articles has clearly been rising in recent years and that countries that have invested in Open Access have typically increased their level of international collaboration.

All this and more can be discovered through Dimensions’ rich data and analytical capabilities as we recently developed and released a number of updates and new features which will help you to gain richer and more precise insights about Open Access for your organization.

Dimensions provides multiple filters to easily display results which are Open Access. Our filters are built around the four most commonly used basic classifications:

  • Bronze – available on websites hosted by their publisher, either immediately or following an embargo, but are not formally licensed for reuse.
  • Green – freely available somewhere other than the publisher’s website, e.g. in a subject or university repository, or the author’s personal website. Applies to self-archiving generally of the pre or post-print or potentially after an embargo period
  • Gold – refers to articles in fully accessible open access journals that are available immediately upon publication without a license
  • Hybrid – refers to subscription journals with open access to individual articles usually when a fee is paid to the publisher or journal by the author, the author’s organization, or the research funder….

Say you wanted to know how many gold Open Access papers by the University of Oxford, funded by the Wellcome Trust, were published in Springer Nature journals between 2013 – 2018? We made discovering that easy as you can see in the screenshot below….”

Open data: growing pains | Research Information

“In its latest State of Open Data survey, Figshare revealed that a hefty 64 per cent of respondents made their data openly available in 2018.

The percentage, up four per cent from last year and seven per cent from 2016, indicates a healthy awareness of open data and for Daniel Hook, chief executive of Figshare’s parent company, Digital Science, it spells good news….

For example, the majority of respondents – 63 per cent – support national mandates for open data, an eight  per cent rise from 2017. And, at the same time, nearly half of the respondents – 46 per cent – reckon data citations motivate them to make data openly available. This figure is up seven per cent from last year….

Yet, amid the data-sharing success stories, myriad worries remain. Top of the pile is the potential for data misuse….

Inappropriate sharing of data is another key concern….

Results indicated that a mighty 58 per cent of respondents felt they do not receive sufficient credit for sharing data, while only nine per cent felt they do….

Coko recently won funding from the Sloan Foundation to build DataSeer, an online service that will use Natural Language Processing to identify datasets that are associated with a particular article. …”

The New Dimensions in Scholcomm: How a Global Scholarly Community Collaboration Created the World’s Largest Linked Research Knowledge System: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  This presentation introduced the audience to and showed the applications of Digital Science’s linked database, Dimensions. Pulling together disparate sources of scholarly profiles, grant awards, publications and citations, and resulting clinical trials, patents, or policies, Dimensions enables a university or research institution to track their institutional research progress. Heidi Becker, from Digital Science, presented on the data aggregation behind Dimensions. Dr. Robert Scott provided a use case study from the University of Georgia. Ralph O’Flinn detailed the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s integration of Dimensions with their scholarly profiles system, Scholars@UAB, and gave a live demonstration of their system, including possible ways of collecting and representing the raw data from the backend of Dimensions.

Funders PlanS – Dimensions/Unpaywall – Sept 2018 – Google Sheets

A spreadsheet of data on the public funding agencies who belong to cOAlition S, which produced Plan S, showing how many journal articles arose from their funding in 2017, and what percentage of those articles were gold OA and green OA. The data are from Dimensions, analysis from Unpaywall. 

The Supercontinent of Scholarly Publishing? – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Three years ago, I felt called to the unhappy task of pointing out the many points of failure in what Lettie Conrad calls the “researcher experience.” I observed that “Instead of the rich and seamless digital library for scholarship that they need, researchers today encounter archipelagos of content bridged by infrastructure that is insufficient and often outdated.” Perhaps researchers need a supercontinent.

Since then, Sci-Hub has come on the scene, and publishers are in some combination of being outraged and/or scared. It may be that these businesses are too late. The formula for stabilizing a sector facing rampant piracy is the combination of legal action and seamless central access to content that allowed the music industry to find a future after Napster. Thus far, for scholarly publishers, legal action is not working, with cross-border enforcement challenging in this geopolitical moment. But what about the seamless centralized access to content? How is this sector going to accept the tectonic shift necessary to establish the supercontinent?…”

CTF Partners with Digital Science to Promote Open Data | Children’s Tumor Foundation

“The Children’s Tumor Foundation’s commitment to collaboration, open data and transparency is reinforced with a partnership with global technology company Digital Science on a new platform for next-generation research and discovery called Dimensions. This groundbreaking research information database aims to transform scholarly search by linking publications, grants, policy, data, and metrics for the first time.”