Surveying the landscape of products and services for sharing preprints – ASAPbio

“We are currently surveying the landscape of preprint servers and platforms and are aware of 15 different products or services in use or in development for sharing preprints. 

With over 1000 new corresponding authors now posting a preprint in the life sciences each month, the adoption of preprinting has been increasing rapidly. While the majority of the growth is currently driven by submissions to bioRxiv, which accepts preprints across the life and biomedical sciences, several preprint servers and platforms have launched in recent years to serve individual research areas and communities. Following developments in the landscape over the past two years, preprint server operators now have a range of products and services to choose between. Today, we share a listing of the preprint server products and services known to ASAPbio. We welcome feedback and information from product owners, service operators and preprint server owners to grow and improve this independent listing….”

After Plan S, Here’s Plan U: Funders Should Require All Research To Be Posted First As A Preprint | Techdirt

Now people are starting to think about ways to put preprints at the heart of academic publishing and research. In the wake of the EU’s “Plan S” to make more research available as open access, there is now a proposal for “Plan U” …

What bioRxiv’s first 30,000 preprints reveal about biologists

“Researchers posted more preprints to the bioRxiv server in 2018 alone than in the four previous years, according to an analysis of the 37,648 preprints posted on the site in its first 5 years.

The analysis also shows that the number of downloads from the site has topped 1 million per month. BioRxiv, which allows researchers in the life sciences to post preliminary versions of studies, turned five last November….

Preprints that are downloaded more often on bioRxiv tend to be published in journals with higher impact factors than preprints that are not downloaded as much….”

Plan U: A proposal to achieve universal access to scientific and medical research via funder preprint mandates

“If all research funders required their grantees to post their manuscripts first on preprint servers — an approach we refer to as “Plan U” — the widespread desire to provide immediate free access to the world’s scientific output would be achieved with minimal effort and expense. As noted above, mathematicians, physicists and computer scientists have been relying on arXiv as their primary means of communication for decades. The biomedical sciences were slower to adopt preprinting, but bioRxiv is undergoing exponential growth and several million readers access articles on bioRxiv every month. Depositing preprints is thus increasingly common among scientists, and mandating it would simply accelerate adoption of a process many predict will become universal in the near future.

There is a precedent for mandating preprint deposition: since 2017, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) has mandated that all grantees deposit preprints prior to or at submission for formal publication. This requirement has been accepted by CZI-funded investigators, many of whom were already routinely depositing manuscripts on bioRxiv….”

PKP and SciELO announce development of open source Preprint Server system | SciELO in Perspective

“In recognition of SciELO’s twentieth anniversary, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and SciELO Program are entering into an agreement to develop a Preprint Server system on the principles that have guided these two organizations over the last two decades.

These governing principles include recognizing the value of: (a) independent manuscript evaluation systems and related services that are open to the academic community on a global basis, (b) comprehensive workflows for scholarly publishing that include options for preprint and post-publication commentary; and (c) affordable open source software systems for the underlying infrastructure for scholarly communication.

PKP and SciELO plan to collaborate on the building of a Preprint Server system fully interoperable with Open Journal System (OJS) and other publishing systems that will serve SciELO Network journals and that will be made publicly available to other organizations to operate….

Podcast 224: What’s a “preprint server,” and how might it change how we think about journals? | Clinical Conversations

“Rohan Khera wrote an editorial in The BMJ to accompany his own paper on guidelines for hypertension treatment. In it, he wrote, not about his research, but about the way biomedical articles are published now, and how preprint servers could change that.”