New free eBook: How to publish low-cost, high-quality open access journals online

“Learn key strategies for developing an open access journal publishing program in Scholastica’s free guide, How to publish low-cost, high-quality open access journals online! Get your copy here!

Are you working to develop an open access (OA) journal publishing program at a scholarly association or academic institution?

Whether you’re cultivating an established OA publishing program or you’re starting your first OA journal, you’re sure to have a full plate. As a journal publisher, you have to oversee the entire lifecycle of your publications—from peer review to copyediting to article production to content hosting and dissemination. It’s a lot to manage!…”

Feminist-Centered Collaborative Scholarly Communication Living Toolkit / Caja Viva de Herramientas para la Comunicación Académica, Colaborativa, y Feminista | trianglesci.org

“The scholarly communication ecosystem reflects in large part the prevailing modes of thought, knowledge creation, and knowledge sharing of the time. Building a scholarly communication project that is truly inclusive of existing voices, thoughts, and perspectives takes time, critical reflection, and iterative thinking. Building a feminist-centered framework for collaborative scholarly communication projects requires enacting an ethic of care to ensure that marginalized voices and perspectives are given the space they deserve and that invisible emotional labor is recognized and valued. This team of six women, who stand at the forefront of the scholarly communication work in their respective regions, institutions, and fields, comes together to explore what it means to build a truly inclusive, feminist-centered scholarly communication agenda, rooted in a foundation of equity.

Given the focus of our individual work and our collective proposal for this project, we are delighted by this year’s theme of “Equity in Scholarly Communications.” Each of us has experienced the inequities inherent in the scholarly communication landscape on a number of fronts. We know what it means to operate in a scholarly communication system rooted in inequity and oppression, and we are committed to bringing an intersectional—taking account of multiple levels of oppression (Kimberle Crenshaw, 1991)—feminist approach to bear in our work.

We recognize the need for a framework of practical tools to help fellow colleagues build scholarly communication projects, at all stages of the process that focus on true equity, inclusiveness, and shared value of labor. We seek to begin building an iterative, living, multi-lingual, crowd-sourced toolkit that focuses on best practices for the conceptualization, creation, and completion of inclusive scholarly communication projects. Whether the project involves interacting with marginalized communities to curate and manage collections of materials, developing decolonized and anti-oppressive descriptions and methods for discovery, or creating culturally sensitive publication and dissemination strategies for these materials and resulting research output, our goal is to begin the process of creating a living document that will address best practices for any of these scenarios across cultural and disciplinary contexts….”

Feminist-Centered Collaborative Scholarly Communication Living Toolkit / Caja Viva de Herramientas para la Comunicación Académica, Colaborativa, y Feminista | trianglesci.org

“The scholarly communication ecosystem reflects in large part the prevailing modes of thought, knowledge creation, and knowledge sharing of the time. Building a scholarly communication project that is truly inclusive of existing voices, thoughts, and perspectives takes time, critical reflection, and iterative thinking. Building a feminist-centered framework for collaborative scholarly communication projects requires enacting an ethic of care to ensure that marginalized voices and perspectives are given the space they deserve and that invisible emotional labor is recognized and valued. This team of six women, who stand at the forefront of the scholarly communication work in their respective regions, institutions, and fields, comes together to explore what it means to build a truly inclusive, feminist-centered scholarly communication agenda, rooted in a foundation of equity.

Given the focus of our individual work and our collective proposal for this project, we are delighted by this year’s theme of “Equity in Scholarly Communications.” Each of us has experienced the inequities inherent in the scholarly communication landscape on a number of fronts. We know what it means to operate in a scholarly communication system rooted in inequity and oppression, and we are committed to bringing an intersectional—taking account of multiple levels of oppression (Kimberle Crenshaw, 1991)—feminist approach to bear in our work.

We recognize the need for a framework of practical tools to help fellow colleagues build scholarly communication projects, at all stages of the process that focus on true equity, inclusiveness, and shared value of labor. We seek to begin building an iterative, living, multi-lingual, crowd-sourced toolkit that focuses on best practices for the conceptualization, creation, and completion of inclusive scholarly communication projects. Whether the project involves interacting with marginalized communities to curate and manage collections of materials, developing decolonized and anti-oppressive descriptions and methods for discovery, or creating culturally sensitive publication and dissemination strategies for these materials and resulting research output, our goal is to begin the process of creating a living document that will address best practices for any of these scenarios across cultural and disciplinary contexts….”

Revisiting – Navigating the Big Deal: A Guide for Societies – The Scholarly Kitchen

“In the wake of Plan S, many research society and independent publishers are exploring potential partnerships with larger publishing houses. While Plan S is the catalyst for this activity, it’s part of a longer term trend in the market toward scale as the key advantage leading to success. The benefit for a smaller publisher in such an arrangement is that they gain access to that scale, along with the resources that come with it. The negatives include losing some levels of control over one’s publication program. In particular, as the Big Deal has evolved, it has changed the way these partnerships can work. Because so much effort is currently going into expanding the Big Deal into The Bigger Deal (adding in open access author fees on top of subscription access), I thought it was a good time to revisit Michael Clarke’s post from last year that talked about understanding the current state of the Big Deal and the careful planning one needs to do in order to put together a successful publishing partnership….”

Revisiting – Navigating the Big Deal: A Guide for Societies – The Scholarly Kitchen

“In the wake of Plan S, many research society and independent publishers are exploring potential partnerships with larger publishing houses. While Plan S is the catalyst for this activity, it’s part of a longer term trend in the market toward scale as the key advantage leading to success. The benefit for a smaller publisher in such an arrangement is that they gain access to that scale, along with the resources that come with it. The negatives include losing some levels of control over one’s publication program. In particular, as the Big Deal has evolved, it has changed the way these partnerships can work. Because so much effort is currently going into expanding the Big Deal into The Bigger Deal (adding in open access author fees on top of subscription access), I thought it was a good time to revisit Michael Clarke’s post from last year that talked about understanding the current state of the Big Deal and the careful planning one needs to do in order to put together a successful publishing partnership….”

Open access Academic publishing in transition

It’s the year 2024: a scientist in Sudan, the family member of a patient with a rare disease in the United States, a farmer in China – assuming they have access to the internet, they are all able to access the latest scientific findings at any time, without restriction and free of charge. On this basis, they can develop new energy supply options for their community, prepare for visits to the doctor or follow the latest research on seeds and breeds. A pipe dream? Or isn’t free access to academic literature something we should have had for a long time, three decades since the development of the world wide web?

A young researcher’s guide to open access publishing | Editage Insights

“In recent years, open access has steadily gained momentum. Most journals and publishers today have open access channels and authors have the choice to publish open access. However, many authors, particularly those who are relatively new to academia, are still in a haze about open access publishing. What is open access? What is the rationale behind publishing open access? What are the different venues for publishing open access? Such questions bother authors and they are often skeptical about publishing open access as there are several myths about open access. This article aims to clear all doubts and provide the fundamentals of open access publication….”