How Do We Find Ourselves Here? Context for Increased Institutional Investment and Ownership of Infrastructure · Commonplace

“How have institutions become so disconnected from the workflow and publication tools that their researchers depend upon to do research, communicate it, validate it? How can this tremendous outsourcing be corrected? How can universities better understand the need for investing in public infrastructure?

We hope that this reading list will provide background and food for thought….”

Project ReShare: Building a Community-Owned Resource Sharing Platform: The Serials Librarian: Vol 78, No 1-4

Abstract:  Project ReShare is a community-driven effort to build an open-source, highly scalable resource sharing platform that supports the research lifecycle from discovery through fulfillment. The project’s initial focus will be on designing tools to facilitate reciprocal borrowing agreements within library consortia, including a shared index, request management system, and workflows for unmediated borrowing. This paper introduces ReShare and describes how the project partners are working to improve the resource sharing experience for library users and staff. It provides background about the project, describes development goals and progress, and addresses future possibilities for ReShare beyond its initial release.

 

Community-Owned Infrastructure

“Data and data analytics are playing an increasingly central role at higher education institutions, and the academic community is at a critical juncture. The growing trend of publisher acquisition of critical infrastructure has underscored a pressing need to understand the changing landscape and develop actions that institutions can—individually and collectively—take to maintain and regain control of data infrastructure. These actions will determine who ultimately controls the research and education process and whether we meaningfully address inequities created by legacy players or simply recreate them in new ways….”

COPIM?

“COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs) is an international partnership of researchers, universities, librarians, open access book publishers and infrastructure providers. It is building community-owned, open systems and infrastructures to enable open access book publishing to flourish.

The landscape of open access book publishing stands at a crossroads: one avenue leads to the monopolisation of open access book publishing by commercial publishers and for-profit intermediaries while the other opens up a more diverse, scholar-led, community-owned, and not-for-profit publishing ecosystem.

COPIM is a project dedicated towards supporting these second sets of possibility. It does so by delivering major improvements in the infrastructures used by open access book publishers and those publishers making a transition to open access books. COPIM’s innovations will enable more productive collaborations between people (including librarians, publishers, and researchers) in the open access landscape and expand opportunities to develop the skills necessary to run open access publishing operations….”

The open scholarship ecosystem faces collapse; it’s also our best hope for a more resilient future | Impact of Social Sciences

“The COVID-19 pandemic is significantly impacting universities and higher education institutions, reducing budgets and presenting new design challenges that will fundamentally alter how research and scholarship operate. Economic volatility is also constraining support for key systems and services that the academy relies on, especially those that are community-led. Kaitlin Thaney argues that there’s a need to converge on community-controlled open scholarship projects, to both meet the demands of the moment, and build a more resilient system for scholarly communication for future crisis situations, and invites readers to participate in planning how such systems can be maintained….

Openness is going to be more radically accepted (even demanded) than ever before post-crisis.

Many key pieces of scholarly research landscape are at risk of going out of business or consolidating by the end of the year. Looking ahead 12-18 months, there is a real threat of infrastructure collapse, the severity and downstream effects of which are not yet fully known at this time.

The current state of funding and resourcing will force institutions to do more with less and to think beyond their walls about shared models of financing….”

The open scholarship ecosystem faces collapse; it’s also our best hope for a more resilient future | Impact of Social Sciences

“The COVID-19 pandemic is significantly impacting universities and higher education institutions, reducing budgets and presenting new design challenges that will fundamentally alter how research and scholarship operate. Economic volatility is also constraining support for key systems and services that the academy relies on, especially those that are community-led. Kaitlin Thaney argues that there’s a need to converge on community-controlled open scholarship projects, to both meet the demands of the moment, and build a more resilient system for scholarly communication for future crisis situations, and invites readers to participate in planning how such systems can be maintained….

Openness is going to be more radically accepted (even demanded) than ever before post-crisis.

Many key pieces of scholarly research landscape are at risk of going out of business or consolidating by the end of the year. Looking ahead 12-18 months, there is a real threat of infrastructure collapse, the severity and downstream effects of which are not yet fully known at this time.

The current state of funding and resourcing will force institutions to do more with less and to think beyond their walls about shared models of financing….”

Fair OA publishers, infrastructures and initiatives supported by KU Leuven | KU Leuven Open Science

KU Leuven promotes non-commercial and community-owned approaches of OA, especially through the KU Leuven Fund for Fair OA. On the one hand, the fund supports innovative publishing initiatives and infrastructures. On the other hand, the fund covers membership costs for consortia and advocacy organizations focusing on a non-commercial approach to scholarly communication. On this page you can find an overview of everything that KU Leuven endorses.

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COPIM Community Governance Workshop Recap: Part 1 · COPIM

“On May 1, 2020, the COPIM project hosted a half-day workshop focused on community governance. COPIM intends to set up an open, community-led governance system for its infrastructures and processes, a structure that we want to develop together with the community of stakeholders that will be involved in the project more broadly, such as academics, publishers, librarians, researchers, and knowledge managers. This community workshop brought together governance experts, key stakeholders in OA book publishing, and representatives from allied large community-led projects, to collaboratively explore what the governance procedures of COPIM’s open publication ecosystem for monographs should look like and to begin thinking about developing models to sustain the governance of the infrastructure as a community-based OA service organization….”

The commercial model of academic publishing underscoring Plan S weakens the existing open access ecosystem in Latin America | Impact of Social Sciences

Health emergencies such as those we face today reveal the importance of opening scientific knowledge; something that not-for-profit open access publishing has permanently and organically allowed for a long time. The expansion of Plan S, a research funder led initiative to promote a global transition to open access to scholarly research, to Latin America has led to significant debate about how the policy will impact the existing system of non-commercial open access publication in Latin America. Responding to earlier posts on this subject, Eduardo Aguado López and Arianna Becerril García argue that introducing Article Processing Charges, whereby academics or their funders pay to publish open access, will inherently degrade existing non-profit forms of open access publishing that have existed in Latin America for over three decade

A multi-institutional model for advancing open access journals and reclaiming the scholarly record

“Numerous factors contributed to the development of the journal Communications in Information Literacy (CIL), which began publication in 2007. Countering the monopolistic and exclusionary practices of commercial journal publishers was a leading concern. The co-founders were motivated by the possibilities of what was then an awakening open research environment to create a truly open access journal, filling a gap in the literature, and helping the library field to commence with reclaiming control of its scholarly record. There were many challenges to this undertaking; among them was the lack of institutional capacity to host or support a library publishing initiative. Accordingly, CIL was developed on the open source platform, Online Journal Systems (OJS), and it was maintained on a commercial web host. The journal grew and flourished under this model for ten years, but continued expansion of CIL and the increasing challenges of maintaining the journal on OJS prompted an exploration of alternative open access publishing options. This led to discussions, negotiations, and ultimately, a partnership with Portland State University. In 2017, CIL migrated from OJS and a commercial web host to Portland State’s Digital Commons (bepress) publishing platform, PDXScholar.

The presenters will provide brief overviews of CIL and PDXScholar, and they will detail the challenges and ultimate successes of this multi-institutional model for advancing open access journals and reclaiming control of the scholarly record. They will highlight the content migration process from OJS to PDXScholar, post-migration actions to correct metadata, the introduction of functioning DOIs, and coordinating with both free web and commercial indexers to assure proper access to the newly-moved journal. The presenters will also discuss the practicalities and the policy implications of this move, particularly in light of Elsevier’s acquisition of bepress. Finally, the presenters will advance their partnership as an exemplar of transformational publishing and as a viable, sustainable model for scholars in other fields to emulate….”