Connecting the Knowledge Commons — From Projects to Sustainable Infrastructure – The End of a Centralized Open Access Project and the Beginning of a Community-Based Sustainable Infrastructure for Latin America – OpenEdition Press

Abstract:  The Latin American region has an ecosystem where the nature of publication is conceived as the act of making public, of sharing, not as the publishing industry. International, national and institutional contexts have led to redefine a project—Redalyc.org—that began in 2003 and that has already fulfilled its original mission: give visibility to knowledge coming from Latin America and promote qualitative scientific journals. Nevertheless, it has to be transformed from a Latin American platform based in Mexico into a community-based regional infrastructure that continues assessing journals’ quality and providing access to full-text, thus allowing visibility for journals and free access to knowledge. It is a framework that generates technology in favor of the empowerment and professionalization of journal editors, making sustainable the editorial task in open access so that Redalyc may sustain itself collectively. This work describes Redalyc’s first model, presents the problematic in process and the new business model Redalyc is designing and adopting to operate.

 

Update from the CDL, CRL & HT Collaboration – First Small Project to Realize Open, Collaborative Infrastructure for Shared Print + Webinars! – California Digital Library

“Earlier this year in July, we shared news with the WEST membership that California Digital Library (CDL, administrative host for WEST), the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), and HathiTrust released a set of framing documents that would guide their collaborative work to realize open infrastructure to support shared print as an integral part of contemporary collection management and development. 

Now we are happy to share that the three organizations have embarked on their first collaborative project: a freely available, web-accessible tool that will enable any library to compare lists of serial holdings with serial retention commitments in PAPR in order to distinguish, in the local list, what has been retained and what has not.

This project embodies the intention of the CDL, CRL & HT collaboration not to rebuild, but to build upon and connect the resources and capabilities that already abound in our community. This project is possible because of the cumulative efforts of many: the original work undertaken by CRL and CDL, funded by the Mellon Foundation, to conceive and develop PAPR; subsequent contributions by WEST in developing the AGUA graphic interface and on-the-fly reporting capability; and, as an added bonus, the collaboration aims to open up a new dataset for comparison: HathiTrust’s digital serials….”

How to achieve short-term green open access and long-term radical reform of scholarly communication. The BitViews Project as a test case – Archive ouverte HAL

Abstract : The Open Access movement has reached adulthood, but not maturity: fewer than one-third of newly-published peer-reviewed articles are available open access (OA) and progress widening OA has stalled. Scores of uncoordinated initiatives try to achieve universal OA, but academic journal publishing is still dominated by a handful of powerful commercial publishers. Individual authors show little interest in OA and indeed have to be mandated (see the UK REF or Plan S) to release their research on OA. The BitViews Project is a low-cost, no-risk, high-return initiative to turn all academic journals «green» through a combination of blockchain technology, provision of appropriate incentives to authors, and a new crowdfunding mechanism. The project is predicated on the active participation of individual libraries taking direct action. The paper will provide an interim report on the progress of the project and an account of how libraries and their various associations (both in the global South and in the global North) have reacted to the project. The concluding section of the paper sketches a possible direction for academic journal publishing in the near future. Huge savings and increased efficiency can flow to the academy from finally dissolving its current one-sided contract with publishers and from reclaiming control of the peer-review process. Practical and incentive-based suggestions are proposed for the transition from publisher-owned to academy-owned peer review.

 

How to achieve short-term green open access and long-term radical reform of scholarly communication. The BitViews Project as a test case – Archive ouverte HAL

Abstract : The Open Access movement has reached adulthood, but not maturity: fewer than one-third of newly-published peer-reviewed articles are available open access (OA) and progress widening OA has stalled. Scores of uncoordinated initiatives try to achieve universal OA, but academic journal publishing is still dominated by a handful of powerful commercial publishers. Individual authors show little interest in OA and indeed have to be mandated (see the UK REF or Plan S) to release their research on OA. The BitViews Project is a low-cost, no-risk, high-return initiative to turn all academic journals «green» through a combination of blockchain technology, provision of appropriate incentives to authors, and a new crowdfunding mechanism. The project is predicated on the active participation of individual libraries taking direct action. The paper will provide an interim report on the progress of the project and an account of how libraries and their various associations (both in the global South and in the global North) have reacted to the project. The concluding section of the paper sketches a possible direction for academic journal publishing in the near future. Huge savings and increased efficiency can flow to the academy from finally dissolving its current one-sided contract with publishers and from reclaiming control of the peer-review process. Practical and incentive-based suggestions are proposed for the transition from publisher-owned to academy-owned peer review.

 

New SPARC Europe report out: Scoping the Open Science Infrastructure Landscape in Europe – SPARC Europe

“Service providers could benefit from:

 

Sharing lessons learnt. This might involve developing communities of practice and guidance; pooling resources and working with initiatives such as Invest in Open Infrastructure (IOI) and JROST. 
Following good governance practices. This allows the community to trust that the infrastructure or service will be steered by the needs of the community and stay true to the values of research.
Going open source and adopting open standards.  “Despite a strong uptake of open source and open standards by many, challenges remain for some in sharing good governance, open content and applying open standards,” wrote the authors.
Diversifying fund-raising efforts, upskilling to embrace a range of business revenue models. This allows the organisation to spread financial risk….”

Open Infrastructure Matters: Supporting Scholar-Led and Community-Driven Services to Advance Open Access | Septentrio Conference Series

“Twenty years ago, open access emerged out of a crisis within scholarly communications. Back then, it was about solving the issue of cost as a barrier to accessing scholarly content, due to the increasing concentration of commercial publishing. Today, another crisis is relying on open access to remove barriers to creating and consuming scholarship. This time, however, our sights are set on increasing public access as a means to solve a global pandemic.

While open scholarship requires information to be freely available, it costs money to create and sustain high quality books and articles, discovery services that provide access to them, and software that enables their creation. We have seen this in discussions and developments surrounding open access business models, including article processing changes (APCs), open access funds, and “subscribe-to-open.” Where such infrastructures do not generate commercial profits, they require financial support from the communities they serve, including authors, publishers, libraries, funders, scholarly institutions and other stakeholders, to make open access a reality. As we set up national networks, mandates, and other initiatives to support and promote open access, we must not forget another critical element: open infrastructure. In the open access context,  “infrastructure” — the “structures and facilities” — refers to the scholarly communication resources and services, including software, that we depend upon to enable the scientific and scholarly community to collect, store, organise, access, share, and assess research. Open infrastructure provides the foundation for keeping costs down and quality high, ensuring community-driven development. But who funds open infrastructure? And how do we create a sustainable future for the services that many of us have come to rely on?

This 20 minute session will examine three open infrastructure case studies: OpenCitations, OAPEN/DOAB, and the Public Knowledge Project. These three initiatives are currently being promoted by the Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS), a network of influential organisations committed to helping secure open access infrastructure well into the future. Our panel of services will explore how the current round of SCOSS-supported projects are ensuring a sustainable future for open access scholarly publishing, and will discuss the essential role that governments, libraries, publishers and others are playing – and need to play – in making this a reality. Following the growth of open access publishing, scholar-led and community-driven open infrastructure and innovations have supported and facilitated the vital (and now urgent) need for open knowledge. What does the next twenty years look like for these services? And how can we work together to ensure open access isn’t just a response to crises, but rather the “new normal”? 

Opscidia – Free and open access scholarly publishing

“Opscidia is a novel platform for free and Open Access scholarly communication. 

The principle of our platform is to host scientific journals led by an academic editorial committee. Hence, the journal is run by its editorial board while Opscidia provides the software infrastructure, host the journal and assist the communication of the journal free of charge….”

Stakeholder-governed OA platforms – OASPA poster work – Google Slides

“Presenting today: Sofie Wennström from the National Library of Sweden along with Jeroen Sondervan from Utrecht University Library. Co-authors are also Jepser Boserup Thestrup from the Royal Danish Library and Antti-Jussi Nygårds from the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies….”