Persistent identifiers and Open Access in the UK: The way forward

“By providing information on the use of persistent identifiers (PIDs) in the research ecosystem, you agree that you have asked us to process it as described in our standard privacy notice at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice. You may instruct us to stop processing it at any time by emailing help@jisc.ac.uk. Until then, we’ll use it to inform work being carried out by Jisc to support the UK’s compliance with Plan S. …”

Introducing the PID Services Registry

“We are pleased to announce the launch of the new persistent identifier (PID) services registry available at https://pidservices.org, a new service to find services built upon different PIDs from core technology providers and those who integrate from across a variety of disciplinary areas. This is a combined effort across multiple organizations as part of the EC-funded FREYA project grant (777523) with the aim of furthering discoverability of PIDs and the services that are built upon them….”

Developing a persistent identifier roadmap for open access to UK research

“This report describes some of the ways that PIDs are already being implemented in the service of open research. It sets out the results of three years of extensive consultation and landscape analysis, exploring the state of the art in PID provision and adoption, requirements for new PID services, and the specific needs of the open research community. It describes the outcomes of a series of community discussions which resulted in a clear list of high priority PIDs for open research. It summarises the available evidence on current levels of PID adoption and usage in the UK, and highlights gaps between the ideal coverage of high priority PIDs and the current status quo. It analyses two workflows fundamental to the delivery of Plan S, namely Gold16 open access publishing, and Green17 open access repository deposit, and shows how the use of PIDs could be used to make them both more transparent and more efficient. We then explore the various identifier systems that are available now which could be considered candidates for each of the prioritised entities….”

What is up with ORCID and ROR? | ORCID

“Will ROR IDs be supported in the ORCID Registry?

Yes. Adding RORs to the ORCID Registry is on our roadmap. Open identifiers for organizations are a critical component of trusted assertions.  While we work out the complex interdependencies involved in implementing ROR, we continue to actively encourage their adoption and use in a wide variety of communication channels.

Will ORCID move to using only ROR organization IDs? 

ORCID is all-in with persistent identifiers. We support a diverse global community with a variety of use cases and requirements.  We are keenly aware that reaching consensus on “the one” is difficult, if not distracting, as we all work toward digital transformation and open research goals.  We expect messiness during this transitional period and strive to provide and support tools – technical and communications – to help manage it, such as FAIR, CARE, and Metadata 2020.  We currently support four organization ID types (GRID, LEI, Crossref funder ID, and Ringgold) in affiliation, funding, research resource, and peer review items. Similarly, we support multiple ID types for other items in the ORCID registry (e.g., DOI, PMID, ISBN and over 40 other identifier types for works; Scopus, ResearcherID, ISNI and others for people).  …”

What is up with ORCID and ROR? | ORCID

“Will ROR IDs be supported in the ORCID Registry?

Yes. Adding RORs to the ORCID Registry is on our roadmap. Open identifiers for organizations are a critical component of trusted assertions.  While we work out the complex interdependencies involved in implementing ROR, we continue to actively encourage their adoption and use in a wide variety of communication channels.

Will ORCID move to using only ROR organization IDs? 

ORCID is all-in with persistent identifiers. We support a diverse global community with a variety of use cases and requirements.  We are keenly aware that reaching consensus on “the one” is difficult, if not distracting, as we all work toward digital transformation and open research goals.  We expect messiness during this transitional period and strive to provide and support tools – technical and communications – to help manage it, such as FAIR, CARE, and Metadata 2020.  We currently support four organization ID types (GRID, LEI, Crossref funder ID, and Ringgold) in affiliation, funding, research resource, and peer review items. Similarly, we support multiple ID types for other items in the ORCID registry (e.g., DOI, PMID, ISBN and over 40 other identifier types for works; Scopus, ResearcherID, ISNI and others for people).  …”

Towards sustainable open access: A society publisher’s principles and pilots for transition – Legge – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Key points

 

New partnerships are needed to move away from paywalls and avoid article publishing charge?based publishing.
It remains difficult for small societies to negotiate with consortia, and partnerships with other societies may be a route forward.
Being open to different open access routes and using different pilots are key to learning which routes will be sustainable in the future.
While the starting position for most ‘read and publish’ offerings is based on historical spend, this will need to be re?evaluated in the longer term.
The lack of independent, universal reporting mechanisms and universally adopted persistent identifiers for institutions is a barrier to establishing agreements and one that needs a cost?effective solution….”