Educopia partners with Curtin University-led alliance to increase the impact of university-based research | Educopia Institute

“A new alliance of researchers led by Curtin University in partnership with Educopia Institute will work together to improve the way research is shared, charting new pathways for the future of universities around the world.

Fresh strategies to reform the role of universities and build them into information-sharing Open Knowledge Institutions will be developed through the coalition of like-minded universities, in a $540,000 project led by Professor Cameron Neylon and Associate Professor Lucy Montgomery, both from Curtin’s Centre for Culture and Technology within the School of Media, Creative Arts and Social Inquiry. The project has been funded by UK-based Arcadia – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, recognizing the success of the Curtin research team in leading research and practice on Open Knowledge universities….

Educopia’s Executive Director Katherine Skinner said the new alliance would provide insights into best practice and a more powerful voice for change….”

 

Towards Coherence through Collective Action: Laying the Foundation for Sustainable, Open Infrastructure | Educopia Institute

“Three coordinated initiatives to talk about:

Invest In Open Infrastructure (IOI)
Open Platform Initiative
Mapping Scholarly Infrastructure Census

Outline for the conversation:

Framing: Mission and Vision
Overview of the Initiatives
The Niche For Action
Open Questions, and Conversation
Direction and Next Steps…”

Next Generation Library Publishing partnership awarded $2.2M from Arcadia to improve scholarly publishing infrastructures | Educopia Institute

“Educopia Institute is pleased to announce an award in the amount of $2,200,000 from Arcadia—a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin—in support of the “Next Generation Library Publishing” project. 

Through this project, Educopia and its partner institutions—California Digital Library (CDL), Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR), Longleaf Services, LYRASIS, and Strategies for Open Science (Stratos)—will provide new publishing pathways for authors, editors, and readers by advancing and integrating open source publishing infrastructure to provide robust support for library publishing. …”

Next Generation Library Publishing partnership awarded $2.2M from Arcadia to improve scholarly publishing infrastructures | Educopia Institute

“Educopia Institute is pleased to announce an award in the amount of $2,200,000 from Arcadia—a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin—in support of the “Next Generation Library Publishing” project. 

Through this project, Educopia and its partner institutions—California Digital Library (CDL), Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR), Longleaf Services, LYRASIS, and Strategies for Open Science (Stratos)—will provide new publishing pathways for authors, editors, and readers by advancing and integrating open source publishing infrastructure to provide robust support for library publishing. …”

Library Publishing Workflows | Educopia Institute

“Educopia Institute, the Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) and 12 partner libraries are embarking on a two-year project to investigate, synchronize, and model a range of workflows to increase the capacity of libraries to publish open access, peer-reviewed scholarly journals. Most library publishers have developed services in response to local needs, and initial workflows are generally home-grown, varied, and idiosyncratic. This represents a missed opportunity for comparative analysis and peer learning; it also yields frequent omissions of crucial workflow steps, such as contributing metadata to aggregators (essential for discovery and impact) and depositing content in preservation repositories (necessary for a stable scholarly record). The workflow model envisioned in this project will help libraries provide a strong alternative to commercial publishing for a wider range of journals, representing a significant advance in the development of open and academy-owned scholarship….”

Next Gen Library Publishing partnership awarded $2.2M Arcadia grant to improve scholarly publishing infrastructure – Office of Scholarly Communication

“Educopia Institute and California Digital Library are pleased to announce an award in the amount of $2,200,000 from Arcadia—a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin—in support of the “Next Generation Library Publishing” project. 

Through this project, Educopia and its partner institutions—California Digital Library (CDL), Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR), Longleaf Services, LYRASIS, and Strategies for Open Science (Stratos)—will provide new publishing pathways for authors, editors, and readers by advancing and integrating open source publishing infrastructure to provide robust support for library publishing. …”

Mapping the Scholarly Communication Infrastructure | Educopia Institute

“Mapping Scholarly Communication Infrastructure is an effort to study the current state of digital scholarship infrastructure in the U.S. and to help envision a more modernized and sustainable system that would enhance scholarly communication at colleges, universities, and research libraries across the country.

With a recent grant from The Andrew Mellon Foundation (see press release) over the next 18 months, this project will focus its efforts on mapping out the range of infrastructure that comprises the system of scholarly communication, and surveying colleges and universities to understand their current investment practices in this infrastructure.

Details of the project are posted on the project website for those who would like to know more….”

Why Are So Many Scholarly Communication Infrastructure Providers Running a Red Queen’s Race? | Educopia Institute

“A few weeks ago, we at Educopia published the first project deliverable for the “Mapping Scholarly Communication Infrastructure” project, which we’re working on with Middlebury College and TrueBearing Consulting. The deliverable is a report and a set of data visualizations based on our deep dive into the organizational and technical infrastructures of “Scholarly Communication Resources,” (SCRs) or the tools, platforms, and services that undergird and support today’s digital knowledge infrastructures.

The report details our project team’s findings from the Census of Scholarly Communication Infrastructure Providers—a survey we ran this spring (and have recently reopened with IOI) to which 45 programs and organizations willingly gave hours of their time and scads of information about their technical development and design, their fiscal models, their revenue streams and expenditures, their documentation, and their governance and community engagement work….

 

Community Cultivation: A Field Guide

“Innovators abound in the fields of libraries, archives, museums, publishing, and higher education. Many of these idea generators find ample support for the creation of tools and technologies that enable new forms of knowledge production, dissemination, or preservation as those tools are first imagined and piloted.

However, when these innovators attempt to sustain their creations, external funding and attention often wane. A well-documented “Valley of Death” stretches between softfunded projects and sustainable programs. Without deep knowledge of how to build a support community, and how to manage such elements as resources, communications, engagement, and governance, innovators find the bridge between grant funding and ongoing operations very difficult to cross….

Many potential tools and services wither, not due to shortfalls in demand or shortcomings in those products, but rather to a lack of attention to organization and community building….

We [at Educopia] are now openly sharing the model that we have developed and refined over the last twelve years. Community Cultivation – A Field Guide provides a powerful lens that can provide both emerging and established communities with ways to understand, evaluate, and plan their own growth, change, and maturation. We are offering this Field Guide freely in the hope that it will empower more community facilitators and leaders to invest in the health and sustainability of their own collaborative networks….”