MARKET WATCH – ESAC Initiative

“The scholarly journal publishing market is in transition. While a great portion of publishers still operate their journals under the subscription paywall business model, open access publishing is keenly on the rise, as fully OA publishers and platforms are launched and come into maturity, scholarly publishers experiment a variety of new open access business models, and, not least, the number of research institutions and library consortia negotiating transformative agreements proliferates.

The visualizations below aim to inform the broader community of a number of key trends in the demographics and distribution of scholarly journal publishing in transition:

the relevance of publishers for scholars and scientists, as expressed in their share of scholarly articles published,
the growth of open access via transformative agreements and the impact these agreements have in enabling universal open access to the research articles produced on a local (country) and global (publisher) level, and
the costs and price points of article processing charges….”

Open Scholarship Knowledge Base | OER Commons

“The Problem

It is difficult for people new to open scholarship ideas and practices to find and apply existing materials.

It is difficult for educators to bring open scholarship concepts and exercises into their courses.

The open scholarship landscape changes quickly, so materials can become outdated. 

Our Solution

Our Project Roadmap outlines our approach: Build a knowledge base platform and a community of contributors to organize information on the what, why, and how of open scholarship so it is easy to find and apply. Contributors keep the information up-to-date and curate modules for self-learning or teaching….”

Opening the Door to Registered Reports: Census of Journals Publishing Registered Reports (2013 – 2020)

Abstract:  Registered reports are a new publication workflow where the decision to publish is made prior to data collection and analysis, and thus cannot be dependent on the outcome of the study. An increasing number of journals have adopted this new mechanism; however, previous research suggests that submission rates are still relatively low. We conducted a census of journals publishing registered reports (N = 278) using independent coders to collect information from submission guidelines, with the goal of documenting journals’ early adoption of registered reports. Our results show that the majority of journals adopting registered reports are in psychology, and it typically takes about a year to publish the first registered report after adopting. However, many journals have still not published their first registered report. There is high variability in impact of journals adopting registered reports. Many journals do not include concrete information about policies that address concerns about registered reports (e.g., exploratory analysis); however, those that do typically allow these practices with some restrictions. Additionally, other open science practices are commonly recommended or required as part of the registered report process, especially open data and materials. Overall, many journals did not include many of the fields coded by the research team, which could be a barrier to submission for some authors. Though the majority of journals allow authors to be anonymous during the review process, a sizable portion do not, which could also be a barrier to submission. We conclude with future directions and implications for authors of registered reports, journals that have already adopted registered reports, and journals that may consider adopting registered reports in the future.

 

Baromètre français de la Science Ouverte 2020

From Google’s English: “According to the 2020 edition of the Open Science Barometer (BSO), 56% of the 156,000 French scientific publications published in 2019 are available opened in December 2020. The rate observed in December 2019, relating to publications produced in 2018, was only 49%. The rate therefore increased by 7 points in one year. From one discipline to another, the proportion of open access varies greatly, from 75% for publications in Mathematics to 40% in Engineering Sciences. In addition, scientific publications published in 2018 or in previous years have an open rate increasing over time. In particular, those published in 2018 are now 54% open (+5 points compared to December 2019), and the increase, which concerns all disciplines, is greater in those less open….”

Open Research Calendar | A community tool to gather all Open Research events in one place

” “Open Research Calendar (@openresearchcal)” was created as a community-powered tool by a few of the attendees of the ‘Advanced Methods in Reproducible Science’ workshop which was organised by the University of Bristol (also known on Twitter as #Repro2020). The idea was initially generated by attendees of #Repro2019. The tool was designed, created and beta-tested in January of 2020 and then officially launched in February 2020. The tool was created to serve the open research community in collating worldwide  open research events into one database. This translates onto a Google Calendar  (iCal Link) which can be synced into a person’s own personal calendar (updating as new events get added). You are advised to review information about calendared events carefully and use your best judgement before committing to attendance or entering into a transaction….”

Data preparation for artificial intelligence in medical imaging: A comprehensive guide to open-access platforms and tools – Physica Medica: European Journal of Medical Physics

“Highlights

Image pre-processing tools are critical to develop and assess AI solutions.
Open access tools and data are widely available for medical image preparation.
AI needs Big Data to develop and fine-tune a model properly.
Big Data needs AI to fully interpret the decision making process….”

 

Open Editors

“Open Editors collects publicly available information about the editors and editorial boards of scholarly journals through a technique called webscraping, whereby a script accesses the websites of the publishers to extract the relevant information. The codes (programmed in R) are available at GitHub….”

EU Trials Tracker — Who’s not sharing clinical trial results?

“The best currently available evidence shows that around half of all trials go unreported: this means that doctors and patients see only a partial, biased fraction of the true evidence. We cannot make informed decisions about treatments unless all the data is reported. Under EU rules, from December 2016, all trials on the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) should post results within 12 months of completion. There has never been a rule as simple and clear as this, anywhere in the world. Our EU Trials Tracker shows which organisations are compliant, and which aren’t. Our paper in the BMJ analysed the data as of January 2018, and found that only 49% of Europe’s clinical trials reported results in the register.

This website is one of a series of Trials Trackers produced by the EBM DataLab at the University of Oxford….”

EU Trials Tracker — Who’s not sharing clinical trial results?

“The best currently available evidence shows that around half of all trials go unreported: this means that doctors and patients see only a partial, biased fraction of the true evidence. We cannot make informed decisions about treatments unless all the data is reported. Under EU rules, from December 2016, all trials on the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) should post results within 12 months of completion. There has never been a rule as simple and clear as this, anywhere in the world. Our EU Trials Tracker shows which organisations are compliant, and which aren’t. Our paper in the BMJ analysed the data as of January 2018, and found that only 49% of Europe’s clinical trials reported results in the register.

This website is one of a series of Trials Trackers produced by the EBM DataLab at the University of Oxford….”