The role of learned societies in national scholarly publishing – Late – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This study examines the role of learned societies as publishers in Finland based on bibliographic information from two Finnish databases. We studied the share of learned societies’ peer?reviewed publication channels (serials with ISSNs and book publishers with distinct ISBN roots) and outputs (journal articles, conference articles, book articles, and monographs) in Finland. We also studied the share of learned societies’ open access (OA) publications. In 2018, there were 402 peer?reviewed publication channels in Finland. In 2011–2017, the number of peer?reviewed publications from scholars working in Finnish universities and published in Finland was 17,724. Learned societies publish around 70% of these channels and publications, mostly in the fields of humanities and social sciences. Learned societies in Finland focus on journal publishing, whereas university presses and commercial publishers focus on book publishing. In 2016–2017, 38.4% of the learned societies’ outputs were OA. This study concludes that Finnish learned societies play an integral part in national scholarly publishing. They play an especially important role in journal publishing, as commercial publishers produce only 2.6% of Finnish journals and book series, and only 1.4% of the journal articles from scholars working in Finnish universities.

 

Blockchain / Web3 Open Science Ecosystem – HackMD

“This pad’s goal is to map the projects that are developing new systems for open science using blockchain, specially the projects that are helping to improve science at any point of its workflow.

We aim to put those projects in contact, so new collaborations can emerge. The projects consists of different legal, structural, etc. phases – listing here is not an endorsement….”

Blockchain / Web3 Open Science Ecosystem – HackMD

“This pad’s goal is to map the projects that are developing new systems for open science using blockchain, specially the projects that are helping to improve science at any point of its workflow.

We aim to put those projects in contact, so new collaborations can emerge. The projects consists of different legal, structural, etc. phases – listing here is not an endorsement….”

Atlas of open science and research in Finland 2019 : Evaluation of openness in the activities of higher education institutions, research institutes, research-funding organisations, Finnish academic and cultural institutes abroad and learned societies and academies. Final report

“This evaluation of the openness of Finnish research organisations, research-funding organisations, academic and cultural institutes abroad and learned societies and academies was completed by the Ministry of Education and Culture to assess the openness of operational cultures and to evaluate progress for the organisations evaluated in previous years. This evaluation covers the activities of Finnish higher education institutions, research institutes, research-funding organisations, the Academic and Cultural Institutes abroad and Learned Societies and Academies in 2019.

This evaluation examines the key indicators chosen to assess the performance on openness. Key indicators are used to provide some insights on the competences and capacity of the research system in supporting progress towards openness. Barriers and development needs are discussed, with suggestions for improvement….”

Atlas of open science and research in Finland 2019 : Evaluation of openness in the activities of higher education institutions, research institutes, research-funding organisations, Finnish academic and cultural institutes abroad and learned societies and academies. Final report

“This evaluation of the openness of Finnish research organisations, research-funding organisations, academic and cultural institutes abroad and learned societies and academies was completed by the Ministry of Education and Culture to assess the openness of operational cultures and to evaluate progress for the organisations evaluated in previous years. This evaluation covers the activities of Finnish higher education institutions, research institutes, research-funding organisations, the Academic and Cultural Institutes abroad and Learned Societies and Academies in 2019.

This evaluation examines the key indicators chosen to assess the performance on openness. Key indicators are used to provide some insights on the competences and capacity of the research system in supporting progress towards openness. Barriers and development needs are discussed, with suggestions for improvement….”

International observatory targets predatory publishers | Times Higher Education (THE)

“A coalition of scientists, funders, publishing societies and librarians believes that the formation of an international observatory to study predatory journals will lead to improved advice on how to tackle them.

The initiative aims to fill the void left by the closure three years ago of Jeffrey Beall’s blacklist of predatory publishers. Since then, many others have set up their own blacklists and checklists, but there is “a lack of unity across the community about what predatory journals are”, said Agnes Grudniewicz, assistant professor at the Telfer School of Management at the University of Ottawa.

The coalition’s biggest achievement so far is to create a consensus definition of predatory journals. It defines predatory journals and publishers as “entities that prioritise self-interest at the expense of scholarship” and “are characterised by false or misleading information, deviation from best editorial and publication practices, a lack of transparency, and/or the use of aggregate and indiscriminate solicitation practices”….

Creating an international observatory – potentially funded by research funders, charities, publishers and research institutions – was a less contentious solution than relying on blacklists or “whitelists” of approved providers, said Dr Grudniewicz. Research led by Michaela Strinzel, from the Swiss National Science Foundation, found that 34 journals listed as predatory by Professor Beall appeared on an approved list of titles run by the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), while 31 DOAJ titles were deemed predatory by subscription service Cabells….”

Enacting Open Scholarship in Transnational Contexts | Pop!

“This essay addresses the question of emerging open scholarly practices in Arab countries. It provides a context for the regional development of globalized higher education and offers some starting points for those interested in collaborating transnationally towards digital knowledge creation….”