National Weather Service faces internet bandwidth shortage, proposes access limits – The Washington Post

“Now, during a year that featured record California wildfires and the busiest Atlantic hurricane season on record, the Weather Service says it has an Internet bandwidth problem and is seeking to throttle back the amount of data its most demanding users can access. The Weather Service, which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), announced the proposed limits in a memo dated Nov. 18….

“It is not clear why the NWS is considering these harmful bandwidth restrictions given the massive scalability of content delivery network (CDN) technology, cloud infrastructure and other technology solutions that are currently available,” AccuWeather’s Porter said. “It’s truly unfortunate that the NWS apparently does not recognize that this proposal is 100 percent contrary to its mission and its obligation to the American people.” …

The House Science, Space and Technology Committee “is aware of the proposal” and monitoring its potential impacts, according to the committee’s staff. “We are looking into how these proposed restrictions could impact NOAA’s ability to ensure free and open public access to the Agency’s data and models,” a spokesperson said. …

 

National Weather Service faces internet bandwidth shortage, proposes access limits – The Washington Post

“Now, during a year that featured record California wildfires and the busiest Atlantic hurricane season on record, the Weather Service says it has an Internet bandwidth problem and is seeking to throttle back the amount of data its most demanding users can access. The Weather Service, which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), announced the proposed limits in a memo dated Nov. 18….

“It is not clear why the NWS is considering these harmful bandwidth restrictions given the massive scalability of content delivery network (CDN) technology, cloud infrastructure and other technology solutions that are currently available,” AccuWeather’s Porter said. “It’s truly unfortunate that the NWS apparently does not recognize that this proposal is 100 percent contrary to its mission and its obligation to the American people.” …

The House Science, Space and Technology Committee “is aware of the proposal” and monitoring its potential impacts, according to the committee’s staff. “We are looking into how these proposed restrictions could impact NOAA’s ability to ensure free and open public access to the Agency’s data and models,” a spokesperson said. …

 

Data Sharing RFP 17Dec2019 – Google Docs

“U.S. fisheries rely on data generated by fishing activities to manage fish populations and meet sustainability mandates. This includes selectively sharing data across many users and communities – scientists, managers, industry, and law enforcement – as well as among states, federal agencies, inter-state fishery commissions, and international management bodies.  As digital tools increase the volume, submission frequency, and complexity of fisheries data, data sharing agreements among NOAA Fisheries and its many partners need to consistently reflect best practices for data security and access, while still adapting to specific use cases. Intertidal Agency is seeking an expert individual, firm, or organization to: conduct a review of existing data sharing agreements, recommend approaches to continue and areas for improvement, provide guidance on when and why to have an agreement or not, and develop a library of language that is usable by both regulatory and technical staff. 

Applicants need not have prior experience with fisheries but should be knowledgeable about the structure and impacts of legal agreements concerning data sharing and management in other sectors. Specific experience with data sharing programs that satisfy state, federal, and international requirements is preferred. Intertidal Agency can provide content expertise as needed and NOAA Fisheries staff will serve as project advisors….”

Data Sharing RFP 17Dec2019 – Google Docs

“U.S. fisheries rely on data generated by fishing activities to manage fish populations and meet sustainability mandates. This includes selectively sharing data across many users and communities – scientists, managers, industry, and law enforcement – as well as among states, federal agencies, inter-state fishery commissions, and international management bodies.  As digital tools increase the volume, submission frequency, and complexity of fisheries data, data sharing agreements among NOAA Fisheries and its many partners need to consistently reflect best practices for data security and access, while still adapting to specific use cases. Intertidal Agency is seeking an expert individual, firm, or organization to: conduct a review of existing data sharing agreements, recommend approaches to continue and areas for improvement, provide guidance on when and why to have an agreement or not, and develop a library of language that is usable by both regulatory and technical staff. 

Applicants need not have prior experience with fisheries but should be knowledgeable about the structure and impacts of legal agreements concerning data sharing and management in other sectors. Specific experience with data sharing programs that satisfy state, federal, and international requirements is preferred. Intertidal Agency can provide content expertise as needed and NOAA Fisheries staff will serve as project advisors….”

Opinion | The Senate Should Reject Trump’s NOAA Nominee – The New York Times

The safety and economic well-being of Americans will be put at risk if the Senate confirms Barry Lee Myers as the next administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

As a nonscientist, Mr. Myers lacks the professional credentials to lead a science-centric agency responsible for daily weather forecasts, severe storm warnings, climate monitoring, fisheries management, coastal restoration and support for marine commerce.

As the former chief executive of the private weather-forecasting company AccuWeather, which relies on data from NOAA’s National Weather Service, he spent years trying to privatize NOAA’s public weather information so his company could profit from it. His family continues to run the family-owned company, raising concerns that they could benefit from decisions he might make as NOAA’s administrator….”