Dear Colleague Letter: Open Science for Research Data (nsf20068) | NSF – National Science Foundation

“Open science fuels scientific discovery and economic gain by making the products of Federally funded research more easily accessible and usable. Open science can also improve scientific rigor by directly linking the products of research (data and software) to their associated publications, making it easier for others to confirm the validity of a scientific result reported in a journal or juried conference proceeding.

In alignment with the benefits of open science, NSF is under taking an expansion of its Public Access Repository (NSF PAR) to include metadata records about the research data1 that supports the journal and juried conference proceeding manuscripts resulting from NSF-funded research. The metadata records about the research data will contain sufficient information to allow for data discovery and an access determination to be made (but not all the metadata necessary for reuse of the research data). Research data will have a Digital Object Identifier (DOI)2 that was assigned to it prior to it being reported to NSF. The research data will not reside in the NSF PAR but will instead reside in a repository, data center, or data portal managed by an organization that is committed to ensuring the availability of the data over time. The anticipated location of research data associated with a publication, if known, can be identified in the Data Management Plan and budgeted in the proposal.

Research data in support of a publication are i) the data necessary to confirm the validity of the scientific result reported in the publication, ii) the data described by the publication, or iii) as specified by the journal or conference proceeding.

Complementing the publication, the metadata record about research data in support of a publication will, as does the publication, become part of the public record on the NSF web site of the scientific contributions of an award. This extension to NSF PAR does not change the timing of reporting. Reporting is still done on an annual and final report basis, and at this time researchers will report on the products of their research that include both publications and supporting data. Data reporting will initially be voluntary.

Through this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), the National Science Foundation (NSF) announces its intention to support conference proposals and EAGER proposals that explore and grow community readiness across all disciplinary areas served by the Foundation for this important advancement in open science as follows:…”

National Summit on Accelerating Public Access to Research Data | Association of American Universities (AAU)

“The Association of American Universities and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities will host an invitation-only National Summit on Accelerating Public Access to Research Data February 20-21, 2020 at the fhi360 Conference Center (1825 Connecticut Ave. NW) in Washington, D.C. The National Summit will bring together universities and stakeholders from the research data community to develop a set of guidelines to assist universities in developing and implementing policies, practices, and guidance to ensure public access to federally funded research data. The National Summit is funded by the National Science Foundation ( Award No. 1939279 ) with support from the National Institutes of Health….”

NSF releases JASON report on research security | NSF – National Science Foundation

“As part of its ongoing effort to keep international research collaboration both open and secure, the National Science Foundation (NSF) today released a report by the independent science advisory group JASON titled “Fundamental Research Security.”

NSF commissioned the report to enhance the agency’s understanding of the threats to basic research posed by foreign governments that have taken actions that violate the principles of scientific ethics and research integrity. With the official receipt of the report, NSF will now begin the process of analyzing its findings and recommendations….

“We expect that a reinvigorated commitment to U.S. standards of research integrity and the tradition of open science by all stakeholders will drive continued preeminence of the U.S. in science, engineering, and technology by attracting and retaining the world’s best talent,” the report says.”

NSF releases JASON report on research security | NSF – National Science Foundation

“As part of its ongoing effort to keep international research collaboration both open and secure, the National Science Foundation (NSF) today released a report by the independent science advisory group JASON titled “Fundamental Research Security.”

NSF commissioned the report to enhance the agency’s understanding of the threats to basic research posed by foreign governments that have taken actions that violate the principles of scientific ethics and research integrity. With the official receipt of the report, NSF will now begin the process of analyzing its findings and recommendations….

“We expect that a reinvigorated commitment to U.S. standards of research integrity and the tradition of open science by all stakeholders will drive continued preeminence of the U.S. in science, engineering, and technology by attracting and retaining the world’s best talent,” the report says.”

Dear Colleague Letter: Effective Practices for Data (nsf19069) | NSF – National Science Foundation

Open science principles are increasingly being adopted by industry, government, and academia. Open science gives rise to public benefits by offering broader access to publication, data, and other research materials; broader access enables broader circulation of scientific knowledge, greater return on investments in research data, and more opportunities for replicating and building upon scientific findings.

NSF’s open science policy is articulated in the Foundation’s Public Access Plan (NSF 15-052) and formally implemented in the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide and in the Award Terms and Conditions that accompany each award that NSF makes. Implications of this policy are further clarified in an actively-maintained set of Frequently Asked Questions (NSF 18-041).

The purpose of this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) is to describe — and encourage — effective practices for managing research data1, including the use of persistent identifiers (IDs) for data and machine-readable data management plans (DMPs)….”