Open Book Publishers are looking for an Editorial Assistant! | OBP

Open Book Publishers is looking for an Editorial Assistant. This is a rare and exciting opportunity to gain first-hand editorial experience working for an innovative and fast-growing academic publisher.

Based in Cambridge, we are a not-for-profit, Open Access publisher of high-quality monographs in the humanities and social sciences. The position is ideally suited to a Master’s or PhD student in the humanities or social sciences, either currently studying or recently graduated. S/he must have a passion for academic publishing, a good eye for detail and a willingness to lend a hand in all aspects of the organisation. Knowledge of the Microsoft Office package, InDesign and Photoshop would be an advantage, although not essential.

Duties will include:

Copy-editing/proofreading manuscripts
Communicating with authors
Formatting indices and footnotes
Contributions to social media channels

The position is full-time (40hrs/week). Initially the work will be remote, but the candidate should be prepared to work from our offices in central Cambridge (UK) in the future. Salary will be competitive and commensurate with experience, starting at a full-time equivalent rate of £22,000-£25,000 per annum. Interviews will be held during the Summer. Closing date for applications: 20th of July 2020.

Further information about Open Book Publishers can be found on our website: www.openbookpublishers.com.
To apply, please email a CV and covering letter to Alessandra Tosi: a.tosi@openbookpublishers.com.

Open Book Publishers are looking for an Editorial Assistant! | OBP

Open Book Publishers is looking for an Editorial Assistant. This is a rare and exciting opportunity to gain first-hand editorial experience working for an innovative and fast-growing academic publisher.

Based in Cambridge, we are a not-for-profit, Open Access publisher of high-quality monographs in the humanities and social sciences. The position is ideally suited to a Master’s or PhD student in the humanities or social sciences, either currently studying or recently graduated. S/he must have a passion for academic publishing, a good eye for detail and a willingness to lend a hand in all aspects of the organisation. Knowledge of the Microsoft Office package, InDesign and Photoshop would be an advantage, although not essential.

Duties will include:

Copy-editing/proofreading manuscripts
Communicating with authors
Formatting indices and footnotes
Contributions to social media channels

The position is full-time (40hrs/week). Initially the work will be remote, but the candidate should be prepared to work from our offices in central Cambridge (UK) in the future. Salary will be competitive and commensurate with experience, starting at a full-time equivalent rate of £22,000-£25,000 per annum. Interviews will be held during the Summer. Closing date for applications: 20th of July 2020.

Further information about Open Book Publishers can be found on our website: www.openbookpublishers.com.
To apply, please email a CV and covering letter to Alessandra Tosi: a.tosi@openbookpublishers.com.

Fair OA publishers, infrastructures and initiatives supported by KU Leuven | KU Leuven Open Science

KU Leuven promotes non-commercial and community-owned approaches of OA, especially through the KU Leuven Fund for Fair OA. On the one hand, the fund supports innovative publishing initiatives and infrastructures. On the other hand, the fund covers membership costs for consortia and advocacy organizations focusing on a non-commercial approach to scholarly communication. On this page you can find an overview of everything that KU Leuven endorses.

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COPIM Community Governance Workshop Recap: Part 1 · COPIM

“On May 1, 2020, the COPIM project hosted a half-day workshop focused on community governance. COPIM intends to set up an open, community-led governance system for its infrastructures and processes, a structure that we want to develop together with the community of stakeholders that will be involved in the project more broadly, such as academics, publishers, librarians, researchers, and knowledge managers. This community workshop brought together governance experts, key stakeholders in OA book publishing, and representatives from allied large community-led projects, to collaboratively explore what the governance procedures of COPIM’s open publication ecosystem for monographs should look like and to begin thinking about developing models to sustain the governance of the infrastructure as a community-based OA service organization….”

Community Governance Explored · COPIM

“As part of our research on governance for the COPIM project, we (Sam and Janneke) are currently undertaking a landscape analysis, initially based on desk research. For this analysis we are looking at the kinds of organisational structures different projects and institutions in the scholarly communication and publishing space (ones that focus on open access publishing and open infrastructure, or whose mission is close to COPIM’s), use to govern their efforts. By examining the disparate approaches to and best practices around governance that are being employed in scholarly communication, we hope to understand how best to devise our own horizontal governance systems for the infrastructures and workflows COPIM is currently developing to support open access for books. In the next stage of our research, we will continue our exploration by additionally looking at various grassroots and activist organisations outside the scholarly communication space that are engaged in experiments with community governance that might be of interest to COPIM. We hope this will help inform our project in creating the durable organisational structures that we need for the coordination, governance and administrative support of the project’s community-owned infrastructure….”

Without stronger academic governance, Covid-19 will concentrate the corporate control of academic publishing | Impact of Social Sciences

Whilst the Covid-19 pandemic has led to a short term uptick in open research practices, both in response to the virus and the need for remote access to research and teaching materials. Samuel Moore argues that the long term impact of Covid-19 and its related economic impact will likely increase the corporate control of academic publishing. Citing the need for increased scholar led forms publishing operating outside of market interests, he suggests now is the time to rethink how scholars and research organisations can constructively engage with the governance of scholarly communication.

Co-creating Open Infrastructure to Support Diversity and Equity

“To reframe our priorities in this way requires collective will and coordination across regions and institutions to build new kinds of support for resource reallocation. It further requires institutional courage and political will to declare that open, autonomous, and equitable systems are preferred over “prestigious” Euro-centric research systems that continue to undermine other epistemic communities from around the world. It requires that disciplines and societies prioritize who they have been centering in their research, whose voices they’ve been amplifying, and whose they have been silencing. Supporting the status quo while leaving initiatives that reflect epistemic diversity and knowledge equity as second-tier priorities will result in continued entrenchment of status quo inequities and the marginalization of truly innovative, equitable systems….”

Transitioning punctum books to Open Source Infrastructure · punctum books

“Without open source digital infrastructure, open access publishing has no long-term chance of truly remaining open, that is, not only free to read but also free to write, free to edit, and free to publish. Without a commitment to make, as much as possible, the entire book production pipeline open, the decision of who gets to write and who gets to read will always remain beholden to actors that do not consider the public good their first priority.

An overarching profit motive of any of the vendors that punctum books uses as part of its pipeline posits a risk for our open access ideal: we are as weak as our most commercial link. Furthermore, the implementation of GDPR in the European Union obliges us to be much more careful with what happens with the personal data of our authors and readers – and rightfully so. Like knowledge, privacy is a public good that is at odds with the idea of profit maximalization. The open source community, on the contrary, embraces the public sharing of knowledge while safeguarding the human right to privacy.

Our first step was to find a replacement of the technically most complicated part of the book production process, the book design itself. This brought us to the good folks of Editoria, who are very close to cracking the nut of creating an open source online collaborative environment for the editing of scholarly texts combined with an output engine that creates well designed EPUB, HTML, PDF, and ICML output formats.

Through the COPIM project of Scholarled, punctum books was also already involved in the development of a metadata database and management system (under the codenames Thoth and Hapi) that will be the first free and open source system to generate ONIX, MARC, and KBART records….”

Transitioning punctum books to Open Source Infrastructure · punctum books

“Without open source digital infrastructure, open access publishing has no long-term chance of truly remaining open, that is, not only free to read but also free to write, free to edit, and free to publish. Without a commitment to make, as much as possible, the entire book production pipeline open, the decision of who gets to write and who gets to read will always remain beholden to actors that do not consider the public good their first priority.

An overarching profit motive of any of the vendors that punctum books uses as part of its pipeline posits a risk for our open access ideal: we are as weak as our most commercial link. Furthermore, the implementation of GDPR in the European Union obliges us to be much more careful with what happens with the personal data of our authors and readers – and rightfully so. Like knowledge, privacy is a public good that is at odds with the idea of profit maximalization. The open source community, on the contrary, embraces the public sharing of knowledge while safeguarding the human right to privacy.

Our first step was to find a replacement of the technically most complicated part of the book production process, the book design itself. This brought us to the good folks of Editoria, who are very close to cracking the nut of creating an open source online collaborative environment for the editing of scholarly texts combined with an output engine that creates well designed EPUB, HTML, PDF, and ICML output formats.

Through the COPIM project of Scholarled, punctum books was also already involved in the development of a metadata database and management system (under the codenames Thoth and Hapi) that will be the first free and open source system to generate ONIX, MARC, and KBART records….”